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  1. Tommy J. Curry & Richard A. Jones (forthcoming). The Black Radical Tradition as an Inspiration for Organizing the Themes of Radical Philosophy in Advance. Radical Philosophy Review.
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  2. Richard A. Jones (2013). The Black Book: Wittgenstein and Race. University Press of America.
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  3. Richard A. Jones (2010). Black Bodies, White Gazes. Radical Philosophy Review 13 (1):69-75.
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  4. Harry van der Linden & Richard A. Jones (2010). Editors' Introduction. Radical Philosophy Review 13 (1):5-8.
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  5. Richard A. Jones (2009). Illuminating the Shadows. Teaching Philosophy 32 (2):113-125.
    This paper discusses the uses of technology in teaching philosophy courses. Where technology is currently utilized, it can be intrinsicallyappropriate or instrumentally inappropriate as a methodology for producing greater student interest, engagement, and positive outcomes. The paper introduces an easily implemented assignment where students produce videos on DVDs in partial fulfillment of requirements for philosophy courses. I argue that, used in philosophy courses, this assignment allows students to be creative, fosters peer dialogue about philosophy, creates excitement in these courses, and (...)
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  6. Richard A. Jones (2009). The Politics of Black Fictive Space. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):391-418.
    Historically, for Black writers, literary fiction has been a site for transforming the discursive disciplinary spaces of political oppression. From 19th century “slave narratives” to the 20th century, Black novelists have created an impressive literary counter-canon in advancing liberatory struggles. W.E.B. Du Bois argued that “all art is political.” Many Black writers have used fiction to create spaces for political and social freedom—from the early work of Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black (1859)—to (...)
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  7. Anne F. Pomeroy & Richard A. Jones (2009). Editors' Introduction. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1-2):7-17.
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  8. Peter Gratton, Richard A. Jones & Harry van der Linden (2008). Editors' Introduction. Radical Philosophy Review 11 (1):3-6.
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  9. Richard A. Jones & Harry van der Linden (2008). Editors' Introduction. Radical Philosophy Review 11 (2):3-7.
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  10. Richard A. Jones (2007). Oppression and Responsibility, by Peg O'Connor. Radical Philosophy Review 10 (2):191-195.
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  11. Richard A. Jones (2006). Black Authenticity/Inauthenticity and American Empire. Radical Philosophy Today 2006:195-210.
    In this paper, I explore political identity for African Americans in an era where the stated aim of the U.S. is global dominance. In ordinary language, I am interested in how blacks can effectively engage in dissent, civil disobedience, protest, insurrection, and revolutionary actions while surviving in an atmosphere where the majority believe either Bush I’s “A friend of my enemy is my enemy,” or Bush II’s “If you harbor terrorists, you’re a terrorist; if you aid and abet terrorists, you’re (...)
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  12. Richard A. Jones (2005). Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights. Teaching Philosophy 28 (2):204-206.
  13. Richard A. Jones (2004). Affirmative Inaction? The Aftermath of Grutter and Gratz. Radical Philosophy Review 7 (2):179-193.
    Admissions to upper-tier universities have become increasingly competitive. The erosion of gains made during the Civil Rights Era is evidenced by recent legal actions at the University of Michigan. In this paper I argue that affirmative action programs remain a necessary means for achieving social justice. Further, I argue that more than mere affirmative action, what is also required is Nancy Fraser’s “Transformative Action.” To reach these conclusions, the paper is divided into three parts: (1) The continued assault on Affirmative (...)
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