Search results for 'Richard Arthur Baer' (try it on Scholar)

993 found
Sort by:
  1. Richard Arthur Baer (1970). Philo's Use of the Categories Male and Female. Leiden,E. J. Brill.score: 870.0
    The themes of becoming male, becoming one, and becoming a virgin, although by no means dominant motifs in Philo's writings, were seen to be thoroughly consistent with his wider usage of the categories male and female. The earlier ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Richard Arthur, "Leibniz's Body Realism: Two Interpretations" Peter Loptson and R. T. W. Arthur.score: 540.0
    In this paper we argue for the robustness of Leibniz's commitment to the reality (but not substantiality) of body. We claim that a number of his most important metaphysical doctrines — among them, psychophysical parallelism, the harmony between efficient and final causes, the connection of all things, and the argument for the plurality of substances stemming from his solution to the continuum problem— make no sense if he is interpreted as giving an eliminative reduction of bodies to perceptions.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Richard T. W. Arthur (2011). Natural Deduction: An Introduction to Logic with Real Arguments, a Little History and Some Humour. Broadview Press.score: 520.0
    Richard Arthur's Natural Deduction provides a wide-ranging introduction to logic. In lively and readable prose, Arthur presents a new approach to the study of logic, one that seeks to integrate methods of argument analysis developed in modern "informal logic" with natural deduction techniques. The dry bones of logic are given flesh by unusual attention to the history of the subject, from Pythagoras, the Stoics, and Indian Buddhist logic, through Lewis Carroll, Venn, and Boole, to Russell, Frege, and (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. James Arthur, Ian Davies & Daniel Wright (2008). The Continuum Library of Educational Thought ‐ Edited by Richard Bailey. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (4):478-483.score: 360.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard B. Norgaard & Paul Baer (2005). Collectively Seeing Complex Systems: The Nature of the Problem. BioScience 55 (11):953.score: 280.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Richard B. Norgaard & Paul Baer (2005). Collectively Seeing Climate Change: The Limits of Formal Models. BioScience 55 (11):961.score: 280.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard Arthur (1999). On Thought Experiments as a Priori Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13 (3):215 – 229.score: 240.0
    Against Norton's claim that all thought experiments can be reduced to explicit arguments, I defend Brown's position that certain thought experiments yield a priori knowledge. They do this, I argue, not by allowing us to perceive “Platonic universals” (Brown), even though they may contain non-propositional components that are epistemically indispensable, but by helping to identify certain tacit presuppositions or “natural interpretations” (Feyerabend's term) that lead to a contradiction when the phenomenon is described in terms of them, and by suggesting a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Richard T. W. Arthur, Minkowski Spacetime and the Dimensions of the Present.score: 240.0
    In Minkowski spacetime, because of the relativity of simultaneity to the inertial frame chosen, there is no unique world-at-an-instant. Thus the classical view that there is a unique set of events existing now in a three dimensional space cannot be sustained. The two solutions most often advanced are (i) that the four-dimensional structure of events and processes is alone real, and that becoming present is not an objective part of reality; and (ii) that present existence is not an absolute notion, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Richard Arthur (1994). Space and Relativity in Newton and Leibniz. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):219-240.score: 240.0
    In this paper I challenge the usual interpretations of Newton's and Leibniz's views on the nature of space and the relativity of motion. Newton's ‘relative space’ is not a reference frame; and Leibniz did not regard space as defined with respect to actual enduring bodies. Newton did not subscribe to the relativity of intertial motions; whereas Leibniz believed no body to be at rest, and Newton's absolute motion to be a useful fiction. A more accurate rendering of the opposition between (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Richard T. W. Arthur, Time, Inertia and the Relativity Principle.score: 240.0
    In this paper I try to sort out a tangle of issues regarding time, inertia, proper time and the so-called “clock hypothesis” raised by Harvey Brown's discussion of them in his recent book, Physical Relativity. I attempt to clarify the connection between time and inertia, as well as the deficiencies in Newton's “derivation” of Corollary 5, by giving a group theoretic treatment original with J.-P. Provost. This shows how both the Galilei and Lorentz transformations may be derived from the relativity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Richard T. W. Arthur, Time Lapse and the Degeneracy of Time: Gödel, Proper Time and Becoming in Relativity Theory.score: 240.0
    In the transition to Einstein’s theory of Special Relativity (SR), certain concepts that had previously been thought to be univocal or absolute properties of systems turn out not to be. For instance, mass bifurcates into (i) the relativistically invariant proper mass m0, and (ii) the mass relative to an inertial frame in which it is moving at a speed v = βc, its relative mass m, whose quantity is a factor γ = (1 – β2) -1/2 times the proper mass, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Richard Arthur, On the Flow of Time.score: 240.0
    During the last hundred years the notion of time flow has been held in low esteem by philosophers of science. Since the metaphor depends heavily on the analogy with motion, criticisms of time flow have either attacked the analogy as poorly founded, or else argued by analogy from a “static” conception of motion. Thus (1) Bertrand Russell argued that just as motion can be conceived as existence at successive places at successive times without commitment to a state of motion at (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Richard T. W. Arthur (1981). Book Review:Quantum Mechanics, a Half Century Later J.L. Lopes, M. Paty. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 48 (1):156-.score: 240.0
  14. Richard Arthur, Leibniz and Cantor on the Actual Infinite.score: 240.0
    I am so in favor of the actual infinite that instead of admitting that Nature abhors it, as is commonly said, I hold that Nature makes frequent use of it everywhere, in order to show more effectively the perfections of its Author. Thus I believe that there is no part of matter which is not, I do not say divisible, but actually divided; and consequently the least particle ought to be considered as a world full of an infinity of different (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Richard Arthur, Leibniz's Syncategorematic Infinitesimals, Smooth Infinitesimal Analysis, and Newton's Proposition.score: 240.0
    In contrast with some recent theories of infinitesimals as non-Archimedean entities, Leibniz’s mature interpretation was fully in accord with the Archimedean Axiom: infinitesimals are fictions, whose treatment as entities incomparably smaller than finite quantities is justifiable wholly in terms of variable finite quantities that can be taken as small as desired, i.e. syncategorematically. In this paper I explain this syncategorematic interpretation, and how Leibniz used it to justify the calculus. I then compare it with the approach of Smooth Infinitesimal Analysis (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Richard Arthur (2004). The Enigma of Leibniz's Atomism. In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume 1. Oup Oxford.score: 240.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Richard Arthur (2007). Beeckman, Descartes and the Force of Motion. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):1--28.score: 240.0
    : In this reassessment of Descartes' debt to his mentor Isaac Beeckman, I argue that they share the same basic conception of motion: the force of a body's motion—understood as the force of persisting in that motion, shorn of any connotations of internal cause—is conserved through God's direct action, is proportional to the speed and magnitude of the body, and is gained or lost only through collisions. I contend that this constitutes a fully coherent ontology of motion, original with Beeckman (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Richard Arthur, From Actuals to Fictions: Four Phases in Leibniz's Early Thought on Infinitesimals.score: 240.0
    In this paper I attempt to trace the development of Gottfried Leibniz’s early thought on the status of the actually infinitely small in relation to the continuum. I argue that before he arrived at his mature interpretation of infinitesimals as fictions, he had advocated their existence as actually existing entities in the continuum. From among his early attempts on the continuum problem I distinguish four distinct phases in his interpretation of infinitesimals: (i) (1669) the continuum consists of assignable points separated (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Richard Arthur, Leery Bedfellows: Newton and Leibniz on the Status of Infinitesimals.score: 240.0
    Newton and Leibniz had profound disagreements concerning metaphysics and the relationship of mathematics to natural philosophy, as well as deeply opposed attitudes towards analysis. Nevertheless, or so I shall argue, despite these deeply held and distracting differences in their background assumptions and metaphysical views, there was a considerable consilience in their positions on the status of infinitesimals. In this paper I compare the foundation Newton provides in his Method Of First and Ultimate Ratios (sketched at some time between 1671 and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Richard T. W. Arthur (2010). Leibniz: Body, Substance, Monad. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (4):721-724.score: 240.0
  21. Richard T. W. Arthur (2013). Leibniz's Theory of Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):499-528.score: 240.0
    In this paper I offer a fresh interpretation of Leibniz’s theory of space, in which I explain the connection of his relational theory to both his mathematical theory of analysis situs and his theory of substance. I argue that the elements of his mature theory are not bare bodies (as on a standard relationalist view) nor bare points (as on an absolutist view), but situations. Regarded as an accident of an individual body, a situation is the complex of its angles (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Richard T. W. Arthur, Actual Infinitesimals in Leibniz's Early Thought.score: 240.0
    Before establishing his mature interpretation of infinitesimals as fictions, Gottfried Leibniz had advocated their existence as actually existing entities in the continuum. In this paper I trace the development of these early attempts, distinguishing three distinct phases in his interpretation of infinitesimals prior to his adopting a fictionalist interpretation: (i) (1669) the continuum consists of assignable points separated by unassignable gaps; (ii) (1670-71) the continuum is composed of an infinity of indivisible points, or parts smaller than any assignable, with no (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Richard Arthur (2007). Leibniz and the Natural World: Activity, Passivity and Corporeal Substances in Leibniz's Philosophy – Pauline Phemister. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):133–137.score: 240.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Richard Arthur (2006). The Remarkable Fecundity of Leibniz's Work on Infinite Series. Annals of Science 63 (2):221-225.score: 240.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Richard Arthur, On Newton's Fluxional Proof of the Vector Addition of Motive Forces.score: 240.0
    This paper consists in an exposition of a proof Newton gave in 1666 of the parallelogram law for compounding velocities, and an examination of its implications for understanding his treatment of motion resulting from a continuously acting force in the Principia. I argue that the “moments” invoked in the fluxional proof of the vector resolution and composition of velocities are “virtual times”, a device allowing Newton to represent motions by the linear displacements produced in such a time; the ratio of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Richard Arthur (1998). Cohesion, Division and Harmony: Physical Aspects of Leibniz's Continuum Problem (1671-1686). Perspectives on Science 6 (1):110-135.score: 240.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Richard Arthur (2001). Leibniz and Clarke: A Study of Their Correspondence. Ezio Vailati. Mind 110 (439):874-878.score: 240.0
  28. Richard T. W. Arthur (2006). Review of Andreas Blank, Leibniz: Metaphilosophy and Metaphysics 1666-1686,. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).score: 240.0
  29. Richard Arthur, Leibniz and the Zenonists: A Reply to Paolo Rossi.score: 240.0
    In a recent note in this review (Leibniz e gli Zenonisti, n. 3, 2001, pp. 15-22) Paolo Rossi stresses the importance of a philosophical sect that he claims has been unjustly ignored in accounts of the history of modern philosophy, the Jesuit philosophers of Louvain and Spain of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century known as the Zenonists. The occasion for his complaint is Massimo Mugnai’s admirable new introduction to Leibniz’s thought (Introduzione alla filosofia di Leibniz, Torino, Einaudi, 2001), (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Richard Arthur (2006). Animal Generation and Substance in Sennert and Leibniz. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    Gottfried Leibniz is well known for his claim to have “rehabilitated” the substantial forms of scholastic philosophy, forging a reconciliation of the New Philosophy of Descartes, Mersenne and Gassendi with Aristotelian metaphysics (in his so-called Discourse on Metaphysics, 1686). Much less celebrated is the fact that fifty years earlier (in his Hypomnemata Physica, 1636) the Bratislavan physician and natural philosopher Daniel Sennert had already argued for the indispensability to atomism of (suitably re-interpreted) Aristotelian forms, in explicit opposition to the rejection (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Richard T. W. Arthur (1986). Leibniz on Continuity. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:107 - 115.score: 240.0
    In this paper I attempt to throw new light on Leibniz's apparently conflicting remarks concerning the continuity of matter. He says that matter is "discrete" yet "actually divided to infinity" and (thus dense), and moreover that it fills (continuous) space. I defend Leibniz from the charge of inconsistency by examining the historical development of his views on continuity in their physical and mathematical context, and also by pointing up the striking similarities of his construal of continuity to the approach taken (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Richard T. W. Arthur (1995). Newton's Fluxions and Equably Flowing Time. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):323-351.score: 240.0
  33. Richard Arthur (1988). Continuous Creation, Continuous Time: A Refutation of the Alleged Discontinuity of Cartesian Time. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (3):349-375.score: 240.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Richard Arthur (1999). Infinite Number and the World Soul; in Defence of Carlin and Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 9:105-116.score: 240.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Richard T. W. Arthur (1987). Book Review:Temporal Relations and Temporal Becoming: A Defense of a Russellian Theory of Time L. Nathan Oaklander. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 54 (1):142-.score: 240.0
  36. Richard Arthur (2001). Leibniz on Infinite Number, Infinite Wholes, and the Whole World. The Leibniz Review 11:103-116.score: 240.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Richard Arthur (1993). De Summa Rerum. The Leibniz Review 3:14-17.score: 240.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Richard Arthur (1998). Infinite Aggregates and Phenomenal Wholes. The Leibniz Review 8:25-45.score: 240.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Rebecca Glover, Barbara Applebaum, William F. Arsenio, Joan Goodman, John Gibbs, James Arthur, Dan Hart, Hae-Jeong Baek, Roger Bergman & Richard Hayes (2004). JME Referees in 2003. Journal of Moral Education 33 (2).score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Galen Strawson, Ser-Min Shel, Johann van Benthem, John Arthur & Richard J. Bernstein (2000). Ita Mar Pitwosky. Review of Metaphysics 54:237-243.score: 240.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. James Arthur & Richard Pring (2012). Editorial: 2012 Special Edition. British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (1):1-2.score: 240.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Richard T. W. Arthur (2012). Presupposition, Aggregation, and Leibniz's Argument for a Plurality of Substances. The Leibniz Review 21:91-115.score: 240.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Richard Norgaard & Paul Baer (2003). Seeing the Whole Picture. World Futures 59 (3 & 4):225 – 239.score: 240.0
    Much of what we need to plan for our survival is already known, but what we know, how we know, and who knows is divided up between disciplines. Thus much of the problem of ensuring our survival is a matter of learning across the disciplines. We identify four modes through which we bring disciplinary knowledge together: the unity of science, integrated assessment, heuristic models, and distributed learning networks. Although none of them are perfect, we can learn how to put our (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Richard Arthur, Christia Mercer, Justin Smith & Catherine Wilson (1997). Kontinuitaet Und Mechanismus. The Leibniz Review 7:25-64.score: 240.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Richard T. W. Arthur (2014). Klaas van Berkel . Isaac Beeckman on Matter and Motion . Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013. Pp. Viii+265. $35.96 (Paper). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (1):192-196.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Richard T. W. Arthur (forthcoming). Lo zenonismo come fonte delle monadi di Leibniz: una risposta a Paolo Rossi. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Richard Tw Arthur (2004). Nicholas Rescher, On Leibniz Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (1):51-53.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Richard Arthur (1976). On Reference as a Component of Meaning. Philosophica 18.score: 240.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Richard Arthur (2009). Review of Andrew Janiak, Newton as Philosopher. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (1).score: 240.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Richard Tw Arthur (2007). “A Complete Denial of the Continuous”? Leibniz's Law of Continuity. Synthese 36.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 993