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Profile: Richard Booth (University of California, Berkeley)
  1. Richard Booth, Thomas Meyer & Chattrakul Sombattheera (2012). A General Family of Preferential Belief Removal Operators. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (4):711 - 733.
    Most belief change operators in the AGM tradition assume an underlying plausibility ordering over the possible worlds which is transitive and complete. A unifying structure for these operators, based on supplementing the plausibility ordering with a second, guiding, relation over the worlds was presented in Booth et al. (Artif Intell 174:1339-1368, 2010). However it is not always reasonable to assume completeness of the underlying ordering. In this paper we generalise the structure of Booth et al. (Artif Intell 174: 1339-1368, 2010) (...)
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  2. Richard Booth, Thomas Meyer & Ivan Varzinczak (2012). PTL: A Propositional Typicality Logic. In Luis Farinas del Cerro, Andreas Herzig & Jerome Mengin (eds.), Logics in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. 107--119.
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  3. Richard Booth & Thomas Meyer (2011). How to Revise a Total Preorder. Journal of Philosophical Logic 40 (2):193 - 238.
    Most approaches to iterated belief revision are accompanied by some motivation for the use of the proposed revision operator (or family of operators), and typically encode enough information in the epistemic state of an agent for uniquely determining one-step revision. But in those approaches describing a family of operators there is usually little indication of how to proceed uniquely after the first revision step. In this paper we contribute towards addressing that deficiency by providing a formal framework which goes beyond (...)
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  4. Richard Booth & Thomas Meyer (2010). Equilibria in Social Belief Removal. Synthese 177 (1):97 - 123.
    In studies of multi-agent interaction, especially in game theory, the notion of equilibrium often plays a prominent role. A typical scenario for the belief merging problem is one in which several agents pool their beliefs together to form a consistent "group" picture of the world. The aim of this paper is to define and study new notions of equilibria in belief merging. To do so, we assume the agents arrive at consistency via the use of a social belief removal function, (...)
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  5. Richard Booth, Samir Chopra, Aditya Ghose & Thomas Meyer (2005). Belief Liberation (and Retraction). Studia Logica 79 (1):47 - 72.
    We provide a formal study of belief retraction operators that do not necessarily satisfy the (Inclusion) postulate. Our intuition is that a rational description of belief change must do justice to cases in which dropping a belief can lead to the inclusion, or ‘liberation’, of others in an agent's corpus. We provide two models of liberation via retraction operators: ρ-liberation and linear liberation. We show that the class of ρ-liberation operators is included in the class of linear ones and provide (...)
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  6. Richard Booth & Eva Richter (2005). On Revising Fuzzy Belief Bases. Studia Logica 80 (1):29 - 61.
    We look at the problem of revising fuzzy belief bases, i.e., belief base revision in which both formulas in the base as well as revision-input formulas can come attached with varying degrees. Working within a very general framework for fuzzy logic which is able to capture certain types of uncertainty calculi as well as truth-functional fuzzy logics, we show how the idea of rational change from “crisp” base revision, as embodied by the idea of partial meet (base) revision, can be (...)
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  7. Richard Booth (2001). The Lexicographic Closure as a Revision Process. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 11 (1-2):35-58.
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