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Profile: Richard Dean (California State University, Los Angeles)
  1. Richard Dean (2014). Respect for the Unworthy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 95 (2).
    The claim that everyone ought to be treated with respect is a familiar and widely accepted prescription in recent moral philosophy, often expressed as a principle of ‘respect for persons.’ I argue that this principle need not be justified by a claim that every person possesses some feature – dignity, autonomy, value, or the like – that makes her worthy of respect. There is abundant conceptual space within many approaches to moral philosophy, including a Kantian approach, to affirm a duty (...)
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  2. Richard Dean (2013). Humanity as an Idea, as an Ideal, and as an End in Itself. Kantian Review 18 (2):171-195.
    Kant emphasizes that moral philosophy must be divided into two parts, a metaphysics of morals, and an empirical application to individuals, which Kant calls 'moral anthropology'. But Kant gives humanity (die Menschheit) a prominent role even in the purely rational part of ethics – for example, one formulation of the categorical imperative is a demand to treat humanity as an end in itself. This paper argues that the only concepts of humanity suited to play such a role are the rational (...)
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  3. Richard Dean (2013). Stigmatization and Denormalization as Public Health Policies: Some Kantian Thoughts. Bioethics 28 (7).
    The stigmatization of some groups of people, whether for some characteristic they possess or some behavior they engage in, will initially strike most of us as wrong. For many years, academic work in public health, which focused mainly on the stigmatization of HIV-positive individuals, reinforced this natural reaction to stigmatization, by pointing out the negative health effects of stigmatization. But more recently, the apparent success of anti-smoking campaigns which employ stigmatization of smokers has raised questions about whether stigmatization may sometimes (...)
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  4. Richard Dean (2012). A Plausible Kantian Argument Against Moralism. Social Theory and Practice 38 (4):577-597.
    There seems to be something wrong with passing moralistic judgments on others’ moral character. Immanuel Kant’s ethics provides insight into an underexplored way in which moralistic judgments are problematic, namely, that they are both a sign of fundamentally poor character in the moralistic person herself and an obstacle to that person’s own moral self-improvement. Kant’s positions on these issues provide a basically compelling argument against moralistic judgment of others, an argument that can be detached from the most controversial elements of (...)
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  5. Richard Dean (2010). Does Neuroscience Undermine Deontological Theory? Neuroethics 3 (1):43-60.
    Joshua Greene has argued that several lines of empirical research, including his own fMRI studies of brain activity during moral decision-making, comprise strong evidence against the legitimacy of deontology as a moral theory. This is because, Greene maintains, the empirical studies establish that “characteristically deontological” moral thinking is driven by prepotent emotional reactions which are not a sound basis for morality in the contemporary world, while “characteristically consequentialist” thinking is a more reliable moral guide because it is characterized by greater (...)
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  6. Richard Dean (2009). The Formula of Humanity as an End in Itself. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
  7. Richard Dean (2008). Glasgow's Conception of Kantian Humanity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 307-314.
    In “Kant’s Conception of Humanity,” Joshua Glasgow defends a traditional reading of the humanity formulation of the Categorical Imperative. Specifically, he opposes taking good will to be the end in itself, and instead argues that the end in itself must be some more minimal “rational capacity.” Most of Glasgow’s article is directed against some arguments I have given in favor of taking the end in itself to be a good will, or the will of a rational being who is committed (...)
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  8. Richard Dean (2006). The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
    The humanity formulation of Kant's Categorical Imperative demands that we treat humanity as an end in itself. Because this principle resonates with currently influential ideals of human rights and dignity, contemporary readers often find it compelling, even if the rest of Kant's moral philosophy leaves them cold. Moreover, some prominent specialists in Kant's ethics have recently turned to the humanity formulation as the most theoretically central and promising principle of Kant's ethics. Nevertheless, it has received less attention than many other (...)
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  9. Richard Dean (2000). Cummiskey's Kantian Consequentialism. Utilitas 12 (01):25-.
    In Kantian Consequentialism, David Cummiskey argues that the central ideas of Kant's moral philosophy provide claims about value which, if applied consistently, lead to consequentialist normative principles. While Kant himself was not a consequentialist, Cummiskey thinks he should have been, given his fundamental positions in ethics. I argue that Cummiskey is mistaken. Cummiskey's argument relies on a non-Kantian idea about value, namely that value can be defined, and objects with value identified, conceptually prior to and independent of the choices that (...)
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  10. Richard Dean (1997). A Defence Of Constrained Maximization. Dialogue 36 (03):453-.
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  11. Richard Dean (1996). What Should We Treat as an End in Itself? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):268-288.
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  12. Richard Dean (1713). An Essay on the Future Life of Brutes, Introduced with Observation Upon Evil, its Nature and Origin. In Aaron Garrett, Richard Dean, Humphrey Primatt, John Oswald & Thomas Young (eds.), Animal Rights and Souls in the Eighteenth Century. Thoemmes Press.
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  13. Aaron Garrett, Richard Dean, Humphrey Primatt, John Oswald & Thomas Young (eds.) (1713/2000). Animal Rights and Souls in the Eighteenth Century. Thoemmes Press.
    The publication of 'Animal Rights and Souls in the 18th Century' will be welcomed by everyone interested in the development of the modern animal liberation movement, as well as by those who simply want to savour the work of enlightenment thinkers pushing back the boundaries of both science and ethics. At last these long out-of-print texts are again available to be read and enjoyed - and what texts they are! Gems like Bougeant's witty reductio of the Christian view of animals (...)
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