Search results for 'Richard G. Swinburne' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  47
    Richard Swinburne & Alan G. Padgett (eds.) (1994). Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne is one of the most distinguished philosophers of religion of our day. In this volume, many notable British and American philosophers unite to honor him and to discuss various topics to which he has contributed significantly. These include general topics in the philosophy of religion such as revelation, and faith and reason, and the specifically Christian doctrines of the Trinity, the Incarnation, and atonement. In the spirit of the movement which Swinburne spearheaded, the essays use (...)
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  2.  18
    Richard Swinburne (2008). Richard Swinburne: Christian Philosophy in a Modern World. Ontos Verlag.
    Richard Swinburne is one of the most influential contemporaryproponents of the analytical philosophy of religion.
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  3.  2
    R. G. Swinburne (1969). The Christian Wager: R. G. SWINBURNE. Religious Studies 4 (2):217-228.
    On what grounds will the rational man become a Christian? It is often assumed by many, especially non-Christians, that he will become a Christian if and only if he judges that the evidence available to him shows that it is more likely than not that the Christian theological system is true, that, in mathematical terms, on the evidence available to him, the probability of its truth is greater than half. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate whether or (...)
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  4. R. G. Swinburne (1988). Faith and the Existence of God: R. G. Swinburne. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 24:121-143.
    Arguments move from premises to conclusions. The premises state things taken temporally for granted; if the argument works, the premises provide grounds for affirming the conclusion. A valid deductive argument is one in which the premises necessitate, that is, entail, the conclusion. What I shall call a ‘correct’ inductive argument is one in which the premises in some degree probabilify the conclusion, but do not necessitate it. More precisely, in what I shall call a correct P -inductive argument the premises (...)
     
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  5. R. G. Swinburne (1969). Physical Determinism: R. G. Swinburne. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 3:155-168.
    The object of this paper is to examine what evidence we can have for or against the truth of determinism, a doctrine often set forward by the proposition ‘every event has a cause’. I understand in this context by the cause of an event a set of prior conditions jointly sufficient for the occurrence of the event. Since the determinist is concerned with all physical states and not merely with changes of states, which are most naturally termed events, we may (...)
     
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  6.  3
    Richard Swinburne (2010). In Defence of Logical Nominalism: Reply to Leftow1: Richard Swinburne. Religious Studies 46 (3):311-330.
    This paper defends logical nominalism, the thesis that logically necessary truth belongs primarily to sentences and depends solely on the conventions of human language. A sentence is logically necessary iff its negation entails a contradiction. A sentence is a posteriori metaphysically necessary iff it reduces to a logical necessity when we substitute for rigid designators of objects or properties canonical descriptions of the essential properties of those objects or properties. The truth-conditions of necessary sentences are not to be found in (...)
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  7.  3
    Richard Swinburne (1993). Reply: A Further Defence of Christian Revelation: Richard Swinburne. Religious Studies 29 (3):395-400.
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  8. Richard Swinburne (2009). How the Divine Properties Fit Together: Reply to Gwiazda: Richard Swinburne. Religious Studies 45 (4):495-498.
    Jeremy Gwiazda has criticized my claim that God, understood as an omnipotent, omniscient, and perfectly free person is a person ‘of the simplest possible kind’ on the grounds that omnipotence etc. as spelled out by me are omnipotence etc. of restricted kinds, and so less simple forms of these properties than maximal forms would be. However the account which I gave of these properties in The Christian God shows that, when they are defined in certain ways, they all follow from (...)
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  9. From Richard Swinburne (1999). Richard Swinburne. In Nigel Warburton (ed.), Philosophy: The Basic Readings. Routledge
     
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  10. Richard Swinburne (1990). The Limits of Explanation: The Limits of Explanation1: Richard Swinburne. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:177-193.
    In purporting to explain the occurrence of some event or process we cite the causal factors which, we assert, brought it about or keeps it in being. The explanation is a true one if those factors did indeed bring it about or keep it in being. In discussing explanation I shall henceforward concern myself only with true explanations. I believe that there are two distinct kinds of way in which causal factors operate in the world, two distinct kinds of causality, (...)
     
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  11.  3
    Richard Swinburne (2004). Bayes' Theorem. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 194 (2):250-251.
    Richard Swinburne: Introduction Elliott Sober: Bayesianism - its scopes and limits Colin Howson: Bayesianism in Statistics A P Dawid: Bayes's Theorem and Weighing Evidence by Juries John Earman: Bayes, Hume, Price, and Miracles David Miller: Propensities May Satisfy Bayes's Theorem 'An Essay Towards Solving a Problem in the Doctrine of Chances' by Thomas Bayes, presented to the Royal Society by Richard Price. Preceded by a historical introduction by G A Barnard.
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  12.  16
    Richard G. Swinburne (1971). Probability, Credibility and Acceptability. American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (3):275 - 283.
    THE PAPER EXAMINES WHAT IS MEANT BY ’EVIDENCE’ WHEN IT IS SAID THAT A THEORY IS PROBABLE ON CERTAIN EVIDENCE. IT CONSIDERS WHAT IS THE RELATION BETWEEN A THEORY BEING PROBABLE ON CERTAIN EVIDENCE, A THEORY BEING BELIEVED, AND A THEORY BEING CREDIBLE. IT DISTINGUISHES VARIOUS SENSES OF ’ACCEPT’ IN WHICH SCIENTISTS ARE SAID TO ACCEPT THEORIES, ONLY ONE OF WHICH IS THE SENSE OF ’ACCEPT’ IN WHICH IT IS EQUATED WITH ’BELIEVE’. IT ANALYSES THE LOGICAL RELATIONS BETWEEN A THEORY (...)
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  13.  18
    C. J. F. Williams, Anthony Savile, Richard Norman, Robert Black, R. G. Swinburne, David Holdcroft, Eva Schaper, Thomas McPheron & Karl Britton (1973). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 82 (328):617-638.
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  14.  2
    G. Swinburne (1977). From Belief to Understanding by Richard Campbell. Philosophical Books 18 (2):69-71.
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  15.  33
    Richard Swinburne (2001). Swinburne and Plantinga on Internal Rationality. Religious Studies 37 (3):357-358.
    Plantinga defines S's belief as ‘privately rational if and only if it is probable on S's evidence’, and ‘publicly rational if and only if it is probable with respect to public evidence’, and he claims that ‘it is an immediate consequence of these definitions that all my basic beliefs are privately rational’. I made it explicitly clear in my review that on my account of a person's evidence (quoted and used by Plantinga) as ‘the content of his basic beliefs (weighted (...)
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  16.  24
    Richard Swinburne (2000). Reply to Richard Gale. Religious Studies 36 (2):221-225.
    I am most grateful to Richard Gale for the detailed attention which he has paid to my detailed arguments, and for the kind remarks between which he sandwiches his hard-hitting criticisms. The first of the latter is that I (211) between different theses, Ss, Sw, and W. I hope not, but I agree that I may not have made the relation between these sufficiently clear. I am certainly committed to, and sought to argue for, the strong version of the (...)
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  17.  4
    Tensed Facts & Richard Swinburne (1990). Richard Garner. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (2).
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  18.  2
    Kelly James Clark, Alan Padgett & Richard Swinburne (1996). Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard SwinburneThe Christian God. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (184):407.
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  19. R. G. Swinburne (1967). HEMPEL, C. G. - "Aspects of Scientific Explanation and Other Essays in the Philosophy of Science". [REVIEW] Mind 76:297.
     
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  20. R. G. Swinburne (1978). NERLICH, G. "The Shape of Space". [REVIEW] Mind 87:450.
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  21. R. G. Swinburne (1976). VESEY, G. "Personal Identity". [REVIEW] Mind 85:143.
     
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  22. Richard Swinburne (2004). The Existence of God. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious experience. He claims (...)
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  23.  96
    Richard Swinburne (2001). Epistemic Justification. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Swinburne offers an original treatment of a question at the heart of epistemology: what makes a belief rational, or justified in holding? He maps the rival accounts of philosophers on epistemic justification ("internalist" and "externalist"), arguing that they are really accounts of different concepts. He distinguishes between synchronic justification (justification at a time) and diachronic justification (synchronic justification resulting from adequate investigation)--both internalist and externalist. He also argues that most kinds of justification are worth having because they (...)
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  24.  3
    Richard Swinburne (2009). Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy (Second Edition). Philosophia Christi 11 (1):249 - 252.
    The great religions often claim that their books or creeds contain truths revealed by God. How could we know that they do? In the second edition of Revelation, renowned philosopher of religion Richard Swinburne addresses this central question. But since the books of great religions often contain much poetry and parable, Swinburne begins by investigating how eternal truth can be conveyed in unfamiliar genres, by analogy and metaphor, within false presuppositions about science and history. In the final (...)
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  25.  61
    Richard Swinburne (1989). Responsibility and Atonement. Oxford University Press.
    According to how we treat others, we acquire merit or guilt, deserve praise or blame, and receive reward or punishment, looking in the end for atonement. In this study distinguished theological philosopher Richard Swinburne examines how these moral concepts apply to humans in their dealings with each other, and analyzes these findings, determining which versions of traditional Christian doctrines--sin and original sin, redemption, sanctification, and heaven and hell--are considered morally acceptable.
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  26.  66
    Richard Swinburne (1994). The Christian God. Oxford University Press.
    What is it for there to be a God, and what reason is there for supposing him to conform to the claims of Christian doctrine? In this pivotal volume of his tetralogy, Richard Swinburne builds a rigorous metaphysical system for describing the world, and applies this to assessing the worth of the Christian tenets of the Trinity and the Incarnation. Part I is dedicated to analyzing the categories needed to address accounts of the divine nature--substance, cause, time, and (...)
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  27.  31
    Richard Swinburne (2013). Mind, Brain, and Free Will. OUP.
    Richard Swinburne presents a powerful case for substance dualism and libertarian free will.
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  28. Richard Swinburne (2004). The Existence of God. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious experience. He claims (...)
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  29.  5
    Richard Swinburne (2010). Was Jesus God? Religious Studies 46 (2):265 - 269.
    The orderliness of the universe and the existence of human beings already provides some reason for believing that there is a God - as argued in Richard Swinburne's earlier book Is There a God ? Swinburne now claims that it is probable that the main Christian doctrines about the nature of God and his actions in the world are true. In virtue of his omnipotence and perfect goodness, God must be a Trinity, live a human life in (...)
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  30. Richard Swinburne (1998). Providence and the Problem of Evil. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Swinburne offers an answer to one of the most difficult problems of religious belief: why does a loving God allow humans to suffer so much? It is the final instalment of Swinburne's acclaimed four-volume philosophical examination of Christian doctrine.
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  31. Richard Swinburne (ed.) (2011). Free Will and Modern Science. OUP/British Academy.
    Do humans have a free choice of which actions to perform? Three recent developments of modern science can help us to answer this question. First, new investigative tools have enabled us to study the processes in our brains which accompanying our decisions. The pioneer work of Benjamin Libet has led many neuroscientists to hold the view that our conscious intentions do not cause our bodily movements but merely accompany them. Then, Quantum Theory suggests that not all physical events are fully (...)
     
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  32.  49
    Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists (...)
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  33. Richard Swinburne (2008). God and Morality. Think 7 (20):7-15.
    The first six articles in this issue of THINK have the theme . Here, Richard Swinburne argues that the existence of God is not a precondition of there being moral truths, but his existence does impact on what moral truths there are.
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  34. Richard Swinburne (2008). Was Jesus God? Oxford University Press Uk.
    The orderliness of the universe and the existence of human beings already provides some reason for believing that there is a God - as argued in Richard Swinburne's earlier book Is There a God? Swinburne now claims that it is probable that the main Christian doctrines about the nature of God and his actions in the world are true. In virtue of his omnipotence and perfect goodness, God must be a Trinity, live a human life in order (...)
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  35.  68
    Richard Swinburne (2008). Reply to Blackburn. Think 7 (20):23-23.
    Richard Swinburne responds to Simon Blackburn.
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  36.  1
    Richard Swinburne (2005). Faith and Reason. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Swinburne presents a new edition of the final volume of his acclaimed trilogy on philosophical theology. Faith and Reason is a self-standing examination of the implications for religious faith of Swinburne's famous arguments about the coherence of theism and the existence of God.By practising a particular religion, a person seeks to achieve some or all of three goals - that he worships and obeys God, gains salvation for himself, and helps others to attain their salvation. But (...)
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  37. Richard Swinburne (2004). The Existence of God. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious experience. He claims (...)
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  38. Richard Swinburne (2008). Reply to My Critics. In Ch Weidemann (ed.), Richard Swinburne: Christian Philosophy in a Modern World. Ontos Verlag
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  39. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press Uk.
    Is There a God? offers a powerful response to modern doubts about the existence of God. It may seem today that the answers to all fundamental questions lie in the province of science, and that the scientific advances of the twentieth century leave little room for God. Cosmologists have rolled back their theories to the moment of the Big Bang, the discovery of DNA reveals the key to life, the theory of evolution explains the development of life... and with each (...)
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  40. Richard Swinburne (ed.) (2005). Bayes's Theorem. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Bayes's theorem is a tool for assessing how probable evidence makes some hypothesis. The papers in this volume consider the worth and applicability of the theorem. Richard Swinburne sets out the philosophical issues. Elliott Sober argues that there are other criteria for assessing hypotheses. Colin Howson, Philip Dawid and John Earman consider how the theorem can be used in statistical science, in weighing evidence in criminal trials, and in assessing evidence for the occurrence of miracles. David Miller argues (...)
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  41. Richard Swinburne (1994). Intellectual Autobiography. In Richard Swinburne & Alan G. Padgett (eds.), Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Oxford University Press 1--18.
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  42. Richard Swinburne (2010). Is There a God? Oxford University Press Uk.
    Is There a God? offers a powerful response to modern doubts about the existence of God. It may seem today that the answers to all fundamental questions lie in the province of science, and that the scientific advances of the twentieth century leave little room for God. Cosmologists have rolled back their theories to the moment of the Big Bang, the discovery of DNA reveals the key to life, the theory of evolution explains the development of life... and with each (...)
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  43. Richard Swinburne (2013). Mind, Brain, and Free Will. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Swinburne presents a powerful new case for substance dualism and for libertarian free will. He argues that pure mental events are distinct from physical events and interact with them, and claims that no result from neuroscience or any other science could show that interaction does not take place. Swinburne goes on to argue for agent causation, and claims that it is we, and not our intentions, that cause our brain events. It is metaphysically possible that each (...)
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  44.  16
    Richard Swinburne (1983). Space, Time and Causality. Reidel.
    THE VOLUME CONTAINS PAPERS BY J L MACKIE, JON DORLING, ELIE ZAHAR, LAWRENCE SKLAR, RICHARD Swinburne, Richard A HEALEY, W H NEWTON-SMITH, NANCY CARTWRIGHT, JEREMY BUTTERFIELD, MICHAEL REDHEAD AND PETER GIBBONS. THEY CONCERN THE IMPLICATIONS FOR OUR UNDERSTANDING OF SPACE, TIME AND CAUSATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTS OF MODERN PHYSICS AND ESPECIALLY OF RELATIVITY THEORY AND QUANTUM THEORY.
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  45. Richard Swinburne (2016). The Coherence of Theism. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Coherence of Theism investigates what it means, and whether it is coherent, to say that there is a God. Richard Swinburne concludes that despite philosophical objections, most traditional claims about God are coherent, and although some of the most important claims are coherent only if the words by which they are expressed are being used in analogical senses, this is the way in which theologians have usually claimed that they are being used. When the first edition of (...)
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  46. Richard Swinburne (1997). The Evolution of the Soul. Clarendon Press.
    This is a revised and updated version of Richard Swinburne's controversial treatment of the eternal philosophical problem of the relation between mind and body. He argues that we can only make sense of the interaction between the mental and the physical in terms of the soul, and that there is no scientific explanation of the evolution of the soul.
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  47. Richard Swinburne (1995). Theodicy, Our Well-Being, and God's Rights. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 38 (1-3):75 - 91.
    Theodicy needs to show, for all actual evils e, that 1) in allowing e, a God would bring about a necessary condition of a good g not achievable in any other morally permissible way, 2) if e occurs, g occurs, 3) it is morally permissible for God to allow e, and 4) g is at least as good as e is bad. This article contributes to a full-scale theodicy by showing that A being of use (e.g., by suffering) to B (...)
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  48.  46
    Richard Swinburne (1997). The Irreducibility of Causation. Dialectica 51 (1):79–92.
    Empiricists have sought to follow Hume in claiming that causality is a relation between events reducible to something more basic, e.g., regularities or counterfactuals. But all such attempts fail through their inability to distinguish cause from effect. The alternative is that causation is irreducible. Regularities are evidence of causation but do not constitute it. We understand what causation is through performing intentional actions which necessarily involve trying, which in turn just is exercising causal power.
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  49.  29
    Richard Swinburne (1990). Tensed Facts. American Philosophical Quarterly 27 (2):117 - 130.
    I defend the A Theory of Time that there are tensed (and other indexical) facts, e.g., about what has happened, as well as tenseless facts, e.g., about what happened in the nineteenth century. I reject arguments of McTaggart and Grunbaum, but concentrate on Mellor’s argument that tenseless truth-conditions can be given for the truth of every tensed sentence. My rebuttal of this argument depends on a distinction between the ’proposition’ and the ’statement’ expressed by a sentence. Statements have changeless truth-value, (...)
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  50.  5
    Brian R. Clack (1995). Alan G. Padgett, Ed. Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Pp. 362. £40.00.James George Frazer. The Golden Bough . Pp. Xlix + 858. £10.99 Pb.H.-E. Mertens & L. Boeve, Eds. Naming God Today. Pp. 104. 380.-BEF.Christopher Nugent. Mysticism, Death and Dying. Pp. Xiv + 127. $12.95.Marian F. Sia & Santiago Sia. From Suffering to God: Exploring Our Images of God in the Light of Suffering. Pp. Xii + 207. £40.00.John E. Thiel. Nonfoundationalism. Pp. Xii + 123. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 31 (2):281.
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