Search results for 'Richard G. Swinburne' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Swinburne & Alan G. Padgett (eds.) (1994). Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Oxford University Press.score: 2970.0
    Richard Swinburne is one of the most distinguished philosophers of religion of our day. In this volume, many notable British and American philosophers unite to honor him and to discuss various topics to which he has contributed significantly. These include general topics in the philosophy of religion such as revelation, and faith and reason, and the specifically Christian doctrines of the Trinity, the Incarnation, and atonement. In the spirit of the movement which Swinburne spearheaded, the essays use (...)
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  2. Richard Swinburne (2008). Richard Swinburne: Christian Philosophy in a Modern World. Ontos Verlag.score: 1680.0
    Richard Swinburne is one of the most influential contemporaryproponents of the analytical philosophy of religion.
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  3. From Richard Swinburne (1999). Richard Swinburne. In Nigel Warburton (ed.), Philosophy: The Basic Readings. Routledge.score: 1440.0
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  4. Richard G. Swinburne (1971). Probability, Credibility and Acceptability. American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (3):275 - 283.score: 870.0
    THE PAPER EXAMINES WHAT IS MEANT BY ’EVIDENCE’ WHEN IT IS SAID THAT A THEORY IS PROBABLE ON CERTAIN EVIDENCE. IT CONSIDERS WHAT IS THE RELATION BETWEEN A THEORY BEING PROBABLE ON CERTAIN EVIDENCE, A THEORY BEING BELIEVED, AND A THEORY BEING CREDIBLE. IT DISTINGUISHES VARIOUS SENSES OF ’ACCEPT’ IN WHICH SCIENTISTS ARE SAID TO ACCEPT THEORIES, ONLY ONE OF WHICH IS THE SENSE OF ’ACCEPT’ IN WHICH IT IS EQUATED WITH ’BELIEVE’. IT ANALYSES THE LOGICAL RELATIONS BETWEEN A THEORY (...)
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  5. C. J. F. Williams, Anthony Savile, Richard Norman, Robert Black, R. G. Swinburne, David Holdcroft, Eva Schaper, Thomas McPheron & Karl Britton (1973). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 82 (328):617-638.score: 810.0
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  6. G. Swinburne (1977). From Belief to Understanding by Richard Campbell. Philosophical Books 18 (2):69-71.score: 810.0
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  7. Richard Swinburne (2001). Swinburne and Plantinga on Internal Rationality. Religious Studies 37 (3):357-358.score: 780.0
    Plantinga defines S's belief as ‘privately rational if and only if it is probable on S's evidence’, and ‘publicly rational if and only if it is probable with respect to public evidence’, and he claims that ‘it is an immediate consequence of these definitions that all my basic beliefs are privately rational’. I made it explicitly clear in my review that on my account of a person's evidence (quoted and used by Plantinga) as ‘the content of his basic beliefs (weighted (...)
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  8. Richard Swinburne (2000). Reply to Richard Gale. Religious Studies 36 (2):221-225.score: 600.0
    I am most grateful to Richard Gale for the detailed attention which he has paid to my detailed arguments, and for the kind remarks between which he sandwiches his hard-hitting criticisms. The first of the latter is that I (211) between different theses, Ss, Sw, and W. I hope not, but I agree that I may not have made the relation between these sufficiently clear. I am certainly committed to, and sought to argue for, the strong version of the (...)
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  9. Tensed Facts & Richard Swinburne (1990). Richard Garner. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (2).score: 540.0
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  10. Kelly James Clark, Alan Padgett & Richard Swinburne (1996). Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard SwinburneThe Christian God. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (184):407.score: 540.0
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  11. Richard Swinburne (2004). The Existence of God. Oxford University Press.score: 480.0
    Richard Swinburne presents a substantially rewritten and updated edition of his most celebrated book. No other work has made a more powerful case for the probability of the existence of God. Swinburne gives a rigorous and penetrating analysis of the most important arguments for theism: the cosmological argument; arguments from the existence of laws of nature and the 'fine-tuning' of the universe; from the occurrence of consciousness and moral awareness; and from miracles and religious experience. He claims (...)
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  12. Richard Swinburne (2008). God and Morality. Think 7 (20):7-15.score: 480.0
    The first six articles in this issue of THINK have the theme . Here, Richard Swinburne argues that the existence of God is not a precondition of there being moral truths, but his existence does impact on what moral truths there are.
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  13. Richard Swinburne (2001). Epistemic Justification. Oxford University Press.score: 480.0
    Richard Swinburne offers an original treatment of a question at the heart of epistemology: what makes a belief rational, or justified in holding? He maps the rival accounts of philosophers on epistemic justification ("internalist" and "externalist"), arguing that they are really accounts of different concepts. He distinguishes between synchronic justification (justification at a time) and diachronic justification (synchronic justification resulting from adequate investigation)--both internalist and externalist. He also argues that most kinds of justification are worth having because they (...)
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  14. Richard Swinburne (2008). Reply to Blackburn. Think 7 (20):23-23.score: 480.0
    Richard Swinburne responds to Simon Blackburn.
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  15. Richard Swinburne (1996). Is There a God? Oxford University Press.score: 480.0
    At least since Darwin's Origin of Species was published in 1859, it has increasingly become accepted that the existence of God is, intellectually, a lost cause, and that religious faith is an entirely non-rational matter--the province of those who willingly refuse to accept the dramatic advances of modern cosmology. Are belief in God and belief in science really mutually exclusive? Or, as noted philosopher of science and religion Richard Swinburne puts forth, can the very same criteria which scientists (...)
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  16. Richard Swinburne (1994). The Christian God. Oxford University Press.score: 480.0
    What is it for there to be a God, and what reason is there for supposing him to conform to the claims of Christian doctrine? In this pivotal volume of his tetralogy, Richard Swinburne builds a rigorous metaphysical system for describing the world, and applies this to assessing the worth of the Christian tenets of the Trinity and the Incarnation. Part I is dedicated to analyzing the categories needed to address accounts of the divine nature--substance, cause, time, and (...)
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  17. Richard Swinburne (2013). Mind, Brain, and Free Will. Oup.score: 480.0
    Richard Swinburne presents a powerful case for substance dualism and libertarian free will.
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  18. Richard Swinburne (1989). Responsibility and Atonement. Oxford University Press.score: 480.0
    According to how we treat others, we acquire merit or guilt, deserve praise or blame, and receive reward or punishment, looking in the end for atonement. In this study distinguished theological philosopher Richard Swinburne examines how these moral concepts apply to humans in their dealings with each other, and analyzes these findings, determining which versions of traditional Christian doctrines--sin and original sin, redemption, sanctification, and heaven and hell--are considered morally acceptable.
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  19. Richard Swinburne (1983). Space, Time and Causality. Reidel.score: 480.0
    THE VOLUME CONTAINS PAPERS BY J L MACKIE, JON DORLING, ELIE ZAHAR, LAWRENCE SKLAR, RICHARD Swinburne, Richard A HEALEY, W H NEWTON-SMITH, NANCY CARTWRIGHT, JEREMY BUTTERFIELD, MICHAEL REDHEAD AND PETER GIBBONS. THEY CONCERN THE IMPLICATIONS FOR OUR UNDERSTANDING OF SPACE, TIME AND CAUSATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTS OF MODERN PHYSICS AND ESPECIALLY OF RELATIVITY THEORY AND QUANTUM THEORY.
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  20. Richard Swinburne (ed.) (2011). Free Will and Modern Science. OUP/British Academy.score: 480.0
    Do humans have a free choice of which actions to perform? Three recent developments of modern science can help us to answer this question. First, new investigative tools have enabled us to study the processes in our brains which accompanying our decisions. The pioneer work of Benjamin Libet has led many neuroscientists to hold the view that our conscious intentions do not cause our bodily movements but merely accompany them. Then, Quantum Theory suggests that not all physical events are fully (...)
     
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  21. Richard Swinburne (1994). Intellectual Autobiography. In Richard Swinburne & Alan G. Padgett (eds.), Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Oxford University Press. 1--18.score: 480.0
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  22. Richard Swinburne (2009). Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy (Second Edition). Philosophia Christi 11 (1):249 - 252.score: 480.0
    The great religions often claim that their books or creeds contain truths revealed by God. How could we know that they do? In the second edition of Revelation, renowned philosopher of religion Richard Swinburne addresses this central question. But since the books of great religions often contain much poetry and parable, Swinburne begins by investigating how eternal truth can be conveyed in unfamiliar genres, by analogy and metaphor, within false presuppositions about science and history. In the final (...)
     
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  23. Richard Swinburne (2008). Reply to My Critics. In Ch Weidemann (ed.), Richard Swinburne: Christian Philosophy in a Modern World. Ontos Verlag.score: 480.0
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  24. Richard Swinburne (2010). Was Jesus God? Religious Studies 46 (2):265 - 269.score: 480.0
    The orderliness of the universe and the existence of human beings already provides some reason for believing that there is a God - as argued in Richard Swinburne's earlier book Is There a God ? Swinburne now claims that it is probable that the main Christian doctrines about the nature of God and his actions in the world are true. In virtue of his omnipotence and perfect goodness, God must be a Trinity, live a human life in (...)
     
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  25. Richard Swinburne (1995). Theodicy, Our Well-Being, and God's Rights. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 38 (1-3):75 - 91.score: 450.0
    Theodicy needs to show, for all actual evils e, that 1) in allowing e, a God would bring about a necessary condition of a good g not achievable in any other morally permissible way, 2) if e occurs, g occurs, 3) it is morally permissible for God to allow e, and 4) g is at least as good as e is bad. This article contributes to a full-scale theodicy by showing that A being of use (e.g., by suffering) to B (...)
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  26. Richard Swinburne (1997). The Irreducibility of Causation. Dialectica 51 (1):79–92.score: 450.0
    Empiricists have sought to follow Hume in claiming that causality is a relation between events reducible to something more basic, e.g., regularities or counterfactuals. But all such attempts fail through their inability to distinguish cause from effect. The alternative is that causation is irreducible. Regularities are evidence of causation but do not constitute it. We understand what causation is through performing intentional actions which necessarily involve trying, which in turn just is exercising causal power.
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  27. Richard Swinburne (1990). Tensed Facts. American Philosophical Quarterly 27 (2):117 - 130.score: 450.0
    I defend the A Theory of Time that there are tensed (and other indexical) facts, e.g., about what has happened, as well as tenseless facts, e.g., about what happened in the nineteenth century. I reject arguments of McTaggart and Grunbaum, but concentrate on Mellor’s argument that tenseless truth-conditions can be given for the truth of every tensed sentence. My rebuttal of this argument depends on a distinction between the ’proposition’ and the ’statement’ expressed by a sentence. Statements have changeless truth-value, (...)
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  28. Brian R. Clack (1995). Alan G. Padgett, Ed. Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Pp. 362. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994.) £40.00.James George Frazer. The Golden Bough (a New Abridgement by Robert Fraser). Pp. Xlix + 858. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994.) £10.99 Pb.H.-E. Mertens & L. Boeve, Eds. Naming God Today. Pp. 104. (Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1994.) 380.-BEF.Christopher Nugent. Mysticism, Death and Dying. Pp. Xiv + 127. (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994.) $12.95.Marian F. Sia & Santiago Sia. From Suffering to God: Exploring Our Images of God in the Light of Suffering. Pp. Xii + 207. (London and Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1994.) £40.00.John E. Thiel. Nonfoundationalism. Pp. Xii + 123. (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1994.). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 31 (2):281.score: 405.0
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  29. Brian R. Clack (1995). Alan G. Padgett, Ed. Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Pp. 362.(Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994.)£ 40.00. James George Frazer. The Golden Bough (a New Abridgement by Robert Fraser). Pp. Xlix+ 858.(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994.)£ 10.99 Pb. H.-E. Mertens & L. Boeve, Eds. Naming God Today. Pp. 104.(Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1994.) 380.-BEF. Christopher Nugent. Mysticism, Death and Dying. Pp. Xiv+ 127.(Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994 ... [REVIEW] Religious Studies 31 (2):281-284.score: 405.0
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  30. Richard Swinburne (2011). Gwiazda on the Bayesian Argument for God. Philosophia 39 (2):393-396.score: 360.0
    Jeremy Gwiazda made two criticisms of my formulation in terms of Bayes’s theorem of my probabilistic argument for the existence of God. The first criticism depends on his assumption that I claim that the intrinsic probabilities of all propositions depend almost entirely on their simplicity; however, my claim is that that holds only insofar as those propositions are explanatory hypotheses. The second criticism depends on a claim that the intrinsic probabilities of exclusive and exhaustive explanatory hypotheses of a phenomenon must (...)
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  31. Richard Swinburne (1986). The Evolution of the Soul. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    This is a revised and updated version of Swinburne's controversial treatment of the eternal philosophical problem of the relation between mind and body. He argues that we can only make sense of the interaction between the mental and the physical in terms of the soul, and that there is no scientific explanation of the evolution of the soul.
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  32. R. G. Swinburne (1971). The Paradoxes of Confirmation - a Survey. American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (4):318 - 330.score: 300.0
    THE PARADOXES OF CONFIRMATION ARE CONSTITUTED BY THE CONTRADICTIONS ARISING FROM THE CONJUNCTION OF THREE PRINCIPLES OF CONFIRMATION - NICOD’S CRITERION, THE EQUIVALENCE CONDITION, AND WHAT THE PAPER CALLS THE SCIENTIFIC LAWS CONDITION. THE PAPER DISCUSSES IN DETAIL THE VARIOUS SOLUTIONS PROVIDED BY ABANDONING ONE OF THE PRINCIPLES. IN THE END IT FINDS NICOD’S CRITERION FALSE, BUT FINDS THE EXPLANATIONS GIVEN BY H.G. ALEXANDER AND OTHERS OF WHY NICOD’S CRITERION IS FALSE THEMSELVES UNSATISFACTORY. IT THEN PROVIDES A MORE ADEQUATE ACCOUNT (...)
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  33. R. G. Swinburne (1971). The Probability of Particular Events. Philosophy of Science 38 (3):327-343.score: 300.0
    The paper investigates what are the proper procedures for calculating the probability on certain evidence of a particular object e having a property, Q, e.g. of Eclipse winning the Derby. Let `α ' denote the conjunction of properties known to be possessed by e, and P(Q)/α the probability of an object which is α being Q. One view is that the probability of e being Q is given by the best confirmed value of P(Q)/α . This view is shown not (...)
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  34. Richard Swinburne (2002). Review: Hume's Abject Failure: The Argument Against Miracles. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):95-99.score: 240.0
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  35. Richard Swinburne (2005). Prior Probabilities in the Argument From Fine-Tuning. Faith and Philosophy 22 (5):641 - 653.score: 240.0
    Theism is a far simpler hypothesis, and so a priori more probably true, than naturalism, understood as the hypothesis that the existence of this law-governed universe has no explanation. Theism postulates only one entity (God) with very simple properties, whereas naturalism has to postulate either innumerable entities all having the same properties, or one very complicated entity with the power to produce the former. If theism is true, it is moderately probable that God would create humanoid beings and so humanoid (...)
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  36. Richard Swinburne (2006). Relations Between Universals,or Divine Laws? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (2):179 – 189.score: 240.0
    Armstrong's theory of laws of nature as relations between universals gives an initially plausible account of why the causal powers of substances are bound together only in certain ways, so that the world is a very regular place. But its resulting theory of causation cannot account for intentional causation, since this involves an agent trying to do something, and trying is causing. This kind of causation is thus a state of an agent and does not involve the operation of a (...)
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  37. R. G. Swinburne (1968). Miracles. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):320-328.score: 240.0
    (I UNDERSTAND BY A MIRACLE, A VIOLATION OF A LAW OF NATURE BY A GOD.) A VIOLATION OF A LAW OF NATURE IS THE OCCURRENCE OF A NON-REPEATABLE COUNTER-INSTANCE TO IT. CONTRARY TO HUME’S VIEW, THERE COULD BE GOOD HISTORICAL EVIDENCE BOTH THAT A VIOLATION HAD OCCURRED AND THAT IT WAS DUE TO THE ACT OF A GOD.
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  38. Richard Swinburne (2001). Plantinga on Warrant. Religious Studies 37 (2):203-214.score: 240.0
    Alvin Plantinga Warranted Christian Belief (New York NY: Oxford University Press, 2000). In the two previous volumes of his trilogy on ‘warrant’, Alvin Plantinga developed his general theory of warrant, defined as that characteristic enough of which terms a true belief into knowledge. A belief B has warrant if and only if: (1) it is produced by cognitive faculties functioning properly, (2) in a cognitive environment sufficiently similar to that for which the faculties were designed, (3) according to a design (...)
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  39. Richard Swinburne (1996). The Beginning of the Universe and of Time. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):169 - 189.score: 240.0
    Given four modest verificationist theses, tying the meaning of talk about instants and periods to the events which (physically) could occur during, before or after them, the only content to the claim the Universe had a beginning (applicable equally to chaotic or orderly universes) is in terms of it being preceded by empty time. It follows that time cannot have a beginning. The Universe, however, could have a beginning--even if it has lasted for an infinite time.
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  40. Richard Swinburne (1995). Thisness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):389 – 400.score: 240.0
    The principle of the identity of indiscernibles holds that two individuals are the same individual if they have all the same properties. There are different forms of the principle, varying with what is allowed to count as a property. An individual has thisness if the weakest form of the principle does not apply to it. Abstract objects, places and times do not have thisness. Inanimate material objects probably do not. Animate beings, and the conscious events which involve them do have (...)
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  41. R. G. Swinburne (1975). Analyticity, Necessity and Apriority. Mind 84 (334):225-243.score: 240.0
    THE PAPER BEGINS BY CONSIDERING THREE ALTERNATIVE DEFINITIONS OF "ANALYTIC," ONE IN TERMS OF LOGICAL TRUTH, ONE IN TERMS OF THE MEANINGS OF WORDS, AND ONE IN TERMS OF SELF-CONTRADICTION OR INCOHERENCE. NEXT, FIVE DEFINITIONS OF "NECESSARY" ARE CONSIDERED, ONE IN TERMS OF ANALYTICITY, AND ONE PICKING OUT THE BROADER KIND OF LOGICAL NECESSITY DISCUSSED BY KRIPKE AND PLANTINGA. FINALLY, THREE DEFINITIONS OF "A PRIORI" ARE CONSIDERED. ONLY ON A FEW OF THESE DEFINITIONS DO THE CATEGORIES OF ANALYTIC, NECESSARY, AND (...)
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  42. Richard Swinburne (2010). God As the Simplest Explanation of the Universe. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (1):1 - 24.score: 240.0
    Inanimate explanation is to be analysed in terms of substances having powers and liabilities to exercise their powers under certain conditions; while personal explanation is to be analysed in terms of persons, their beliefs, powers, and purposes. A crucial criterion for an explanation being probably true is that it is (among explanations leading us to expect the data) the simplest one. Simplicity is a matter of few substances, few kinds of substances, few properties (including powers and liabilities), few kinds of (...)
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  43. Richard Swinburne (2010). In Defence of Logical Nominalism: Reply to Leftow. Religious Studies 46 (3):311-330.score: 240.0
    This paper defends (especially in response to Brian Leftow’s recent attack) logical nominalism, the thesis that logically necessary truth belongs primarily to sentences and depends solely on the conventions of human language. A sentence is logically necessary (that is, a priori metaphysically necessary) iff its negation entails a contradiction. A sentence is a posteriori metaphysically necessary iff it reduces to a logical necessity when we substitute for rigid designators of objects or properties canonical descriptions of the essential properties of those (...)
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  44. Richard Swinburne (1985). Thought. Philosophical Studies 48 (September):153-172.score: 240.0
    AN OCCURRENT THOUGHT IS DISTINGUISHED FROM BELIEF, INTELLIGENT BEHAVIOR, AND THE ACTIVE PROCESS OF THINKING. THE OCCURRENCE OF THOUGHTS IS NOT TO BE ANALYZED IN TERMS OF THE OCCURRENCE OF IMAGES OF WORDS OF SENTENCES WHICH EXPRESS THEM AND OFTEN ACCOMPANY THEM. THOUGHTS HAVE INBUILT INTENTIONALITY.
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  45. R. G. Swinburne (1980). Scientific Realism and the Plasticity of Mind By Paul M. Churchland Cambridge University Press, 1979, 157 Pp., £8.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 55 (212):273-.score: 240.0
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  46. Richard Swinburne (2003). The Argument to God From Fine-Tuning Reassessed. In Neil A. Manson (ed.), God and Design: The Teleological Argument and Modern Science. Routledge. 80--105.score: 240.0
    It is most improbable a priori that laws of nature should have a form, and their constants have values, and the variables of the boundary conditions of our universe should have values, of such a kind as to lead to the evolution of human bodies. If there is a God it is quite probable that there would be human bodies. Our only grounds for believing that there are other universes, are grounds for believing that those universes are governed by the (...)
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  47. Richard Swinburne (2012). What Kind of Necessary Being Could God Be? In Miroslaw Szatkowski (ed.), Ontological Proofs Today. Ontos Verlag. 345.score: 240.0
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  48. R. G. Swinburne (1968). The Argument From Design. Philosophy 43 (165):199 - 212.score: 240.0
    ARGUMENTS FROM DESIGN TO THE EXISTENCE OF GOD MAY TAKE AS THEIR PREMISS EITHER THE EXISTENCE OF REGULARITIES OF COPRESENCE OR THE EXISTENCE OF REGULARITIES OF SUCCESSION. THERE ARE NO VALID FORMAL OBJECTIONS TO A CAREFULLY ARTICULATED ARGUMENT OF THE LATTER TYPE. AGAINST SUCH AN ARGUMENT NONE OF THE OBJECTIONS IN HUME’S "DIALOGUES" HAVE ANY WORTH. THE ARGUMENT MAY HOWEVER GIVE ONLY A SMALL DEGREE OF SUPPORT TO ITS CONCLUSION.
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  49. Richard Swinburne (2002). William Lane Craig God, Time and Eternity. The Coherence of Theism II: Eternity. (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001). Pp. XI+321. £74.00 (Hbk). ISBN 1402000111. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 38 (3):363-369.score: 240.0
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  50. Richard Swinburne (2002). Response to My Commentators. Religious Studies 38 (3):301-315.score: 240.0
    This is my response to the critical commentaries by Hasker, McNaughton and Schellenberg on my tetralogy on Christian doctrine. I dispute the moral principles invoked by McNaughton and Schellenberg in criticism of my theodicy and theory of atonement. I claim, contrary to Hasker, that I have taken proper account of the ‘existential dimension' of Christianity. I agree that whether it is rational to pursue the Christian way depends not only on how probable it is that the Christian creed is true (...)
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