1. Richard M. Gale & Alexander R. Pruss (1999). A New Cosmological Argument. Religious Studies 35 (4):461-476.
    We will give a new cosmological argument for the existence of a being who, although not proved to be the absolutely perfect God of the great Medieval theists, also is capable of playing the role in the lives of working theists of a being that is a suitable object of worship, adoration, love, respect, and obedience. Unlike the absolutely perfect God, the God whose necessary existence is established by our argument will not be shown to essentially have the divine perfections (...)
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  2. Richard M. Gale & Alexander R. Pruss (2002). A Response to Oppy, and to Davey and Clifton. Religious Studies 38 (1):89-99.
    Our paper ‘A new cosmological argument’ gave an argument for the existence of God making use of the weak Principle of Sufficient Reason (W-PSR) which states that for every proposition p, if p is true, then it is possible that there is an explanation for p. Recently, Graham Oppy, as well as Kevin Davey and Rob Clifton, have criticized the argument. We reply to these criticisms. The most interesting kind of criticism in both papers alleges that the W-PSR can be (...)
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  3.  61
    Richard M. Gale (1991). On the Nature and Existence of God. Cambridge University Press.
    There has been in recent years a plethora of defenses of theism from analytical philosophers such as Plantinga, Swinburne, and Alston. Richard Gale's important book is a critical response to these writings. New versions of cosmological, ontological, and religious experience arguments are critically evaluated, along with pragmatic arguments to justify faith on the grounds of its prudential or moral benefits. A special feature of the book is the discussion of the atheological argument that attempts to deduce a contradiction from the (...)
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  4. Richard M. Gale (2010). William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 252-253.
    This book is essential reading for all interpreters of William James. Too often they, myself included, sadly neglect the historical setting of his work. Bordogna's erudite and often brilliant scholarly forays in the history of science and intellectual history, which make effective use of concepts from the sociology of science and the history of disciplinarity, go a long way to compensate for this deficiency.This is a real book, and a bold one at that, because it has an exciting underlying thesis (...)
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  5. Richard M. Gale (1970). Strawson's Restricted Theory of Referring. Philosophical Quarterly 20 (79):162-165.
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  6.  9
    Richard M. Gale (1968). The Language of Time. New York, Humanitites Press.
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  7.  58
    Richard M. Gale (1999). William James and the Willfulness of Belief. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):71-91.
    It was important to James’s philosophy, especially his doctrine of the will to believe, that we could believe at will. Toward this end he argues in The Principles of Psychology that attending to an idea is identical with believing it, which, in turn, is identical with willing that it be realized. Since willing is identical with believing and willing is an intentional action, it follows by Leibniz’s Law that believing also is an intentional action. This paper explores the problems with (...)
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  8.  67
    Richard M. Gale (1987). Parfit's Arguments Against Partially Relativized Theories of Rationality. Analysis 47 (4):230 - 236.
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  9. Richard M. Gale (1961). Professor Ducasse on Determinism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (September):92-96.
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  10.  40
    Richard Gale (1994). Why Alston's Mystical Doxastic Practice Is Subjective. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (4):869 - 875.
    Within each of the great religions there is a well established doxastic practice (DP) of taking experiential inputs consisting of apparent direct perceptions of God (M experiences) as giving prima facie justification, subject to defeat by overriders supplied by that religion, for belief outputs that God exists and is as he presents himself. (This DP is abbreviated as "MP.") William Alston's primary aim in his excellent book, Perceiving God, is to establish that we have epistemic justification for believing that MPs (...)
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  11.  16
    Richard Gale (1996). Some Difficulties in Theistic Treatments of Evil. In Daniel Howard-Snyder (ed.), The Evidential Argument From Evil. Indiana University Press 206--218.
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  12.  30
    Richard M. Gale (1966). Existence, Tense, and Presupposition. The Monist 50 (1):98-108.
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  13. Richard M. Gale (1969). A Note on Personal Identity and Bodily Continuity. Analysis 30 (June):193-195.
  14.  11
    Richard M. Gale (2010). John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic. Prometheus Books.
    Introduction -- Part I: Growth, inquiry, and unity -- Problems with inquiry -- Aesthetic inquiry -- Inquiry, inquiry, inquiry -- Why unification? -- Part II: The metaphysics of unity -- The quest for being QUA being -- Time and individuality -- The Humpty-Dumpty intuition -- The mystical.
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  15. Richard M. Gale (2007). Evil and Alvin Plantinga. In Deane-Peter Baker (ed.), Alvin Plantinga. Cambridge University Press
     
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  16.  76
    Richard M. Gale (2001). Alvin Plantinga's Warranted Christian Belief. Philo 4 (2):138-147.
    In Warranted Christian Belief, Alvin Plantinga makes use of his earlier two books, Warrant: the Current Debate and Warrant and Proper Function, to show how it is possible for someone to have a warranted belief that God exists and that all of the great things of the Christian Gospel are true even if the believer is unable to give any argument to support these beliefs. Three objections are lodged against Plantinga’s position. First, the alleged sensus divinitatis and the internal instigation (...)
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  17. Richard M. Gale (2007). The Failure of Classical Theistic Arguments. In Michael Martin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Atheism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 86--101.
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  18. Richard M. Gale (1990). Freedom and the Free Will Defense. Social Theory and Practice 16 (3):397-423.
    It is my purpose to explore some of the problems concerning the relation between divine creation and creaturely freedom by criticizing various versions of the Free Will Defense (FWD hereafter).1 The FWD attempts to show how it is possible for God and moral evil to co-exist by describing a possible world in which God is morally justified or exonerated for creating persons who freely go wrong. Each version of the FWD has its own story to tell of how it is (...)
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  19.  4
    Richard M. Gale (1999). The Divided Self of William James. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    This book offers a powerful interpretation of the philosophy of William James. It focuses on the multiple directions in which James's philosophy moves and the inevitable contradictions that arise as a result. The first part of the book explores a range of James's doctrines in which he refuses to privilege any particular perspective: ethics, belief, free will, truth and meaning. The second part of the book turns to those doctrines where James privileges the perspective of mystical experience. Richard Gale then (...)
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  20.  53
    Richard Gale (1998). R. M. Adams's Theodicy of Grace. Philo 1 (1):36-44.
    R. M. Adams’s essay, “Must God Create the Best?” can be interpreted as offering a theodicy for God’s creating morally less perfect beings than he could have created. By creating these morally less perfect beings, God is bestowing grace upon them, which is an unmerited or undeserved benefit. He does so, however, in advance of the free moral misdeeds that render them undeserving. This requires that God have middle knowledge, pace Adams’s version of the Free Will Theodicy, of what would (...)
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  21. Richard M. Gale (1993). On the Existence and Nature of God. Philosophical Review 102 (3):433-435.
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  22. Richard M. Gale (1976). Negation and Non-Being. Blackwell.
     
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  23. Richard M. Gale (2010). The Naturalism of John Dewey. In Molly Cochran (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press
     
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  24.  18
    Richard M. Gale (1962). Tensed Statements. Philosophical Quarterly 12 (46):53-59.
  25.  3
    A. R. Pruss & Richard M. Gale (2005). Cosmological and Design Arguments. In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press 116--137.
    The cosmological and teleological argument both start with some contingent feature of the actual world and argue that the best or only explanation of that feature is that it was produced by an intelligent and powerful supernatural being. The cosmological argument starts with a general feature, such as the existence of contingent being or the presence of motion and uses some version of the Principle of Sufficient Reason to conclude that this feature must have an explanation. The debate then focuses (...)
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  26.  13
    Richard M. Gale (1970). Space and Time. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 67 (9):300-316.
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  27.  47
    Richard M. Gale (1972). On What There Isn't. Review of Metaphysics 25 (3):459 - 488.
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  28. Richard M. Gale (1968). The Philosophy of Time: A Collection of Essays. London, Macmillan.
     
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  29. Richard M. Gale & Alexander R. Pruss (eds.) (2003). The Existence of God.
     
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  30.  51
    Richard M. Gale (1994). Swinburne's Argument From Religious Experience. In Alan G. Padgett (ed.), Reason and the Christian Religion. Clarendon 39--63.
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  31.  11
    Richard M. Gale (1983). The Concept of Identity by Eli Hirsch. Journal of Philosophy 80 (4):247-253.
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  32.  42
    Richard M. Gale (2002). Divine Omniscience, Human Freedom, and Backwards Causation. Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):85-88.
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  33.  19
    Richard M. Gale (1994). James on Self Identity Over Time. Modern Schoolman 71 (3):165-189.
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  34.  46
    Richard M. Gale (ed.) (2002). The Blackwell Guide to Metaphysics. Blackwell Publishers.
    __ __ __The Blackwell Guide to Metaphysics__ is a definitive introduction to the core areas of metaphysics. It brings together sixteen internationally respected philosophers that demonstrate how metaphysics is done as they examine topics including causation, temporality, ontology, personal identity, idealism, and realism.
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  35.  16
    Richard M. Gale (2002). The Metaphysics of John Dewey. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 38 (4):477 - 519.
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  36.  28
    Richard Gale (2005). John Dewey's “Time and Individuality”. Modern Schoolman 82 (4):175-192.
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  37.  35
    Richard M. Gale (1969). 'Here' and 'Now'. The Monist 53 (3):396-409.
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  38.  15
    Richard M. Gale (1986). Omniscience-Immutability Arguments. American Philosophical Quarterly 23 (4):319 - 335.
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  39.  33
    Richard M. Gale (1991). Pragmatism Versus Mysticism: The Divided Self of William James. Philosophical Perspectives 5 (1991):241-286.
    James' pragmatism attempts to reconcile his tough--and tender-minded selves. It does not, however, assuage a deeper conflict between his promethean pragmatic self and his mystical self. It is argued that James' philosophy up until the late 1890's is almost exclusively promethean, being based on his brand of "humanistic" pragmatism, and that his later writings tend, though not without important exceptions, for he never succeeded in becoming a unified self, to give voice to a competing anti-promethean type of mysticism of the (...)
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  40.  23
    Richard M. Gale (1964). The Egocentric Particular and Token-Reflexive Analyses of Tense. Philosophical Review 73 (2):213-228.
  41.  31
    Richard M. Gale (1969). 'Here' and 'Now'. The Monist 53 (3):396-409.
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  42.  8
    Richard M. Gale (1969). Referring. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 66 (6):168-177.
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  43.  23
    Richard M. Gale (1980). William James and the Ethics of Belief. American Philosophical Quarterly 17 (1):1 - 14.
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  44.  48
    Richard M. Gale (2000). Swinburne on Providence. Religious Studies 36 (2):209-219.
    My review of Swinburne's elaborate and ingenious higher-good type theodicy will begin with an examination of his argument for why the theist needs a theodicy in the first place. After a preliminary sketch of his theodicy and its crucial free-will plank, its rational-choice theoretic arguments will be critically scrutinized.
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  45.  10
    Richard M. Gale (1999). William James and the Willfulness of Belief. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):71 - 91.
    It was important to James’s philosophy, especially his doctrine of the will to believe, that we could believe at will. Toward this end he argues in The Principles of Psychology that attending to an idea is identical with believing it, which, in turn, is identical with willing that it be realized. Since willing is identical with believing and willing is an intentional action, it follows by Leibniz’s Law that believing also is an intentional action. This paper explores the problems with (...)
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  46.  47
    Alexander Pruss & Richard M. Gale (2003). A Response to Almeida and Judisch. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 53 (2):65-72.
    Our new cosmological argument for the existence of God weakens the usual Principle of Sufficient Reason premise that every contingent true proposition has an explanation to a weaker principle (WPSR) that every such proposition could have an explanation. Almeida and Judisch have criticized the premises of our argument for leading to a contradiction. We show that their argument fails, but along the way we are led to clarify the nature of the conclusion of our argument. Moreover, we discuss an argument (...)
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  47.  30
    Richard M. Gale (2006). The Problem of Ineffability in Dewey's Theory of Inquiry. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):75-90.
    A Deweyan inquiry begins with an indeterminate situation and terminates, when successful, with a determinate situation, both of which Dewey holds to be unique and therefore ineffable. This ineffability requirement has the disastrous consequences that Dewey's beloved collective inquiry is impossible and that there are no objective criteria for the success of inquiry. It is found that Dewey's ineffability requirement results from his misbegotten attempt to aestheticize inquiry so that it is an act of artistic creation. It is suggested that (...)
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  48.  19
    Richard M. Gale (1970). Do Performative Utterances Have Any Constative Function? Journal of Philosophy 67 (5):117-121.
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  49.  16
    Richard M. Gale (1989). Lewis' Indexical Argument for World-Relative Actuality. Dialogue 28 (02):289-.
  50.  16
    Richard M. Gale (1965). Why a Cause Cannot Be Later Than Its Effect. Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):209 - 234.
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