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  1. Richard P. Hayes, Dharmak¯Irti on Punarbhava.
    Religious doctrines and the philosophical arguments supporting them often become more clearly defined as a result of being challenged by opposing views and counterarguments. Conversely, ideas that are never challenged often remain relatively obscure and poorly defined. The process of encountering rival ideas and alternative theories requires people to re-examine their own assumptions and provide reasons for holding views that could previously be taken for granted. It is not surprising, therefore, that a number of important notions within Buddhist philosophy became (...)
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  2. Richard P. Hayes, Gotama Buddha and Religious Pluralism.
    Buddhism currently enjoys the reputation of being one of the leading voices in a chorus that sings the praises of religious tolerance and perhaps even of pluralism. It is open to question, however, whether this reputation is deserved. The purpose of the present article is to examine whether the teachings of classical Buddhism have a contribution to make to the jubilation over religious pluralism that has become fashionable in some quarters in recent years. It is hoped that this examination might (...)
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  3. Richard P. Hayes, Ritual, Self-Deception and Make-Believe: A Classical Buddhist Perspective.
    Everyone, with the possible exception of those who are really good at it, is personally familiar with the phenomenon of self-deception. Anyone who has been conscious of struggling with a temptation to do what goes against her own better judgment and has then found justification for yielding to temptation is familiar with self-deception. So if I may be allowed to begin with the assumption that most of us have experienced a phenomenon that we would identify as some form of self-deception, (...)
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  4. Richard Hayes, A Buddha and His Cousin.
    Like most religions, the Buddhist tradition is rich in stories that are designed to illustrate key principles and values. Stories of the Buddha himself offer a verbal portrait of an ideal human being that followers of the tradition can aspire to emulate; his story offers a picture of a person with a perfectly healthy mind. Stories of other people (and of gods, ghosts and ghouls) portray a wide range of beings from the nearly perfect to the dreadfully imperfect, all presented (...)
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  5. Richard Hayes, Classical Buddhist Model of a Healthy Mind.
    The purpose of this chapter will be to outline the classical Buddhist program for transforming the human mentality from one that is rigid, closed and prone to injuring itself and others to one that is flexible, open and competent to heal itself and others.
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  6. Richard Hayes, Did Buddhism Anticipate Pragmatism?
    Writers presenting Buddhism to European and North American audiences have often availed themselves of philosophical terminology from modern traditions to convey presumably less familiar ideas coming from various classical and medieval Asian settings. Since the Buddha and many philosophers who developed his ideas seem to have stressed the importance of practice over theory, Buddhism is frequently described as practical or even pragmatic in its orientation. Since there have been few unpleasant clashes between traditional Buddhist beliefs and the findings of modern (...)
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  7. Richard P. Hayes & Dan Lusthaus, Commentarial Sanskrit.
    It is true for many disciplines within the humanities that there are numerous excellent works that introduce the beginner to the basic building blocks of the discipline, and also many advanced studies for the accomplished scholar, but few works that help the student get from the beginning stage to the advanced level. That has certainly been true of the discipline of Sanskrit. Once a student has devoted a couple of years to working through one of the excellent introductions to the (...)
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  8. Richard Hayes (forthcoming). A Majoritarian Proposal for Governing Human Biotechnology. Bioethics Forum.
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  9. Richard Hayes (forthcoming). Madhyamaka. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Madhyamaka school of Buddhism, the followers of which are called Mādhyamikas, was one of the two principal schools of Mahāyāna Buddhism in India, the other school being the Yogācāra. The name of the school is a reference to the claim made of Buddhism in general that it is a middle path (madhyamā pratipad) that avoids the two extremes of eternalism—the doctrine that all things exist because of an eternal essence—and annihilationism—the doctrine that things have essences while they exist but (...)
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  10. Andrew Vallely, Shelley Lees, Charles Shagi, Saidi Kapiga, Sheena McCormack & Richard Hayes (2012). Ethics, Justice and Community Participation in the Microbicides Development Programme (MDP) Phase III Trial in Mwanza, Tanzania. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (11):46-48.
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  11. Andrew Vallely, Shelley Lees, Charles Shagi, Stella Kasindi, Selephina Soteli, Natujwa Kavit, Lisa Vallely, Sheena McCormack, Robert Pool & Richard J. Hayes (2010). How Informed is Consent in Vulnerable Populations? Experience Using a Continuous Consent Process During the MDP301 Vaginal Microbicide Trial in Mwanza, Tanzania. BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):10-.
    Background: HIV prevention trials conducted among disadvantaged vulnerable at-risk populations in developing countries present unique ethical dilemmas. A key concern in bioethics is the validity of informed consent for trial participation obtained from research subjects in such settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a continuous informed consent process adopted during the MDP301 phase III vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania. Methods: A total of 1146 women at increased risk of HIV acquisition working as alcohol (...)
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  12. Andrew Vallely, Charles Shagi, Shelley Lees, Katherine Shapiro, Joseph Masanja, Lawi Nikolau, Johari Kazimoto, Selephina Soteli, Claire Moffat, John Changalucha, Sheena McCormack & Richard J. Hayes (2009). Microbicides Development Programme: Engaging the Community in the Standard of Care Debate in a Vaginal Microbicide Trial in Mwanza, Tanzania. BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):17-.
    BackgroundHIV prevention research in resource-limited countries is associated with a variety of ethical dilemmas. Key amongst these is the question of what constitutes an appropriate standard of health care (SoC) for participants in HIV prevention trials. This paper describes a community-focused approach to develop a locally-appropriate SoC in the context of a phase III vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza City, northwest Tanzania.MethodsA mobile community-based sexual and reproductive health service for women working as informal food vendors or in traditional and modern (...)
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  13. Brendan S. Gillon & Richard P. Hayes (2008). Dharmakīrti on the Role of Causation in Inference as Presented in Pramāṇavārttika Svopajñavṛtti 11–38. Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (3):335-404.
    In the svārthānumāna chapter of his Pramāṇavārttika, the Buddhist philosopher Dharmakīrti presented a defense of his claim that legitimate inference must rest on a metaphysical basis if it is to be immune from the risks ordinarily involved in inducing general principles from a finite number of observations. Even if one repeatedly observes that x occurs with y and never observes y in the absence of x, there is no guarantee, on the basis of observation alone, that one will never observe (...)
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  14. Rebecca Glover, Barbara Applebaum, William F. Arsenio, Joan Goodman, John Gibbs, James Arthur, Dan Hart, Hae-Jeong Baek, Roger Bergman & Richard Hayes (2004). JME Referees in 2003. Journal of Moral Education 33 (2).
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  15. Richard P. Hayes (2001). Reflections on Three Recent Works by Sangharakshita. Contemporary Buddhism 2 (2):219-229.
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  16. Richard Hayes (1994). Nägarjuna's Appeal. Journal of Indian Philosophy 22:311.
     
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  17. Richard P. Hayes (1994). Nāgārjuna's Appeal. Journal of Indian Philosophy 22 (4):299-378.
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  18. Richard P. Hayes (1994). N?G?Rjuna's Appeal. Journal of Indian Philosophy 22 (4):299-378.
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  19. Richard P. Hayes & Brendan S. Gillon (1991). Introduction to Dharmakīrti's Theory of Inference as Presented in Pramā $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$}}{N} " />Avārttika Svopajñav $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{T}$}}{T} " />Tti 1–10. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 19 (1).
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  20. Richard P. Hayes & Brendan S. Gillon (1991). Introduction to Dharmakīrti's Theory of Inference as Presented in Pramā $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$$ Avārttika Svopajñav $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{T}$$ Tti 1–10. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 19 (1):1-73.
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  21. Richard P. Hayes (1988). Principled Atheism in the Buddhist Scholastic Tradition. Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (1):5-28.
    The doctrine that there is no permanent creator who superintends creation and takes care of his creatures accords quite well with each of the principles known as the four noble truths of Buddhism. The first truth, that distress is universal, is traditionally expounded in terms of the impermanence of all features of experience and in terms of the absence of genuine unity or personal identity in the multitude of physical and mental factors that constitute what we experience as a single (...)
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  22. Richard P. Hayes (1987). On the Reinterpretation of Dharmakīrti's Sbavhāvahetu. Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (4):319-332.
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  23. Richard Ph Hayes (1986). PT Raju, Structural Depths of Indian Thought Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (8):396-398.
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  24. Richard P. Hayes (1980). Dinnāga's Views on Reasoning (Svārthānumāna). Journal of Indian Philosophy 8 (3):219-277.
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