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Richard Healey [72]Richard A. Healey [13]
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Profile: Richard Andrew Healey (University of Arizona)
Profile: Richard Healey (University of Sheffield)
  1.  27
    Richard Healey (2007). Gauging What's Real. Oxford University Press.
    Gauge theories have provided our most successful representations of the fundamental forces of nature. This book describes the representations provided by gauge theories in both classical and quantum physics. I defend the thesis that gauge transformations are purely formal symmetries of almost all the classes of representations provided by each of our theories of fundamental forces. Evidence for classical gauge theories of forces (other than gravity) gives us reason to believe that loops rather than points are the locations of fundamental (...)
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  2.  95
    Richard Healey (2012). Quantum Theory: A Pragmatist Approach. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (4):729-771.
    While its applications have made quantum theory arguably the most successful theory in physics, its interpretation continues to be the subject of lively debate within the community of physicists and philosophers concerned with conceptual foundations. This situation poses a problem for a pragmatist for whom meaning derives from use. While disputes about how to use quantum theory have arisen from time to time, they have typically been quickly resolved, and consensus reached, within the relevant scientific sub-community. Yet rival accounts of (...)
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  3. Richard Healey (2013). How Quantum Theory Helps Us Explain. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (1):axt031.
    I offer an account of how the quantum theory we have helps us explain so much. The account depends on a pragmatist interpretation of the theory: this takes a quantum state to serve as a source of sound advice to physically situated agents on the content and appropriate degree of belief about matters concerning which they are currently inevitably ignorant. The general account of how to use quantum states and probabilities to explain otherwise puzzling regularities is then illustrated by showing (...)
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  4. Richard Healey (2001). On the Reality of Gauge Potentials. Philosophy of Science 68 (4):432-455.
    Classically, a gauge potential was merely a convenient device for generating a corresponding gauge field. Quantum-mechanically, a gauge potential lays claim to independent status as a further feature of the physical situation. But whether this is a local or a global feature is not made any clearer by the variety of mathematical structures used to represent it. I argue that in the theory of electromagnetism (or a non-Abelian generalization) that describes quantum particles subject to a classical interaction, the gauge potential (...)
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  5. Richard A. Healey (1991). Holism and Nonseparability. Journal of Philosophy 88 (8):393-421.
  6.  21
    Richard Healey (1989). The Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics: An Interactive Interpretation. Cambridge University Press.
    This is one of the most important books on quantum mechanics to have appeared in recent years. It offers a dramatically new interpretation that resolves puzzles and paradoxes associated with the measurement problem and the behavior of coupled systems. A crucial feature of this interpretation is that a quantum mechanical measurement can be certain to have a particular outcome even when the observed system fails to have the property corresponding to that outcome just prior to the measurement interaction.
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  7. Richard Healey (2009). Perfect Symmetries. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (4):697-720.
    While empirical symmetries relate situations, theoretical symmetries relate models of a theory we use to represent them. An empirical symmetry is perfect if and only if any two situations it relates share all intrinsic properties. Sometimes one can use a theory to explain an empirical symmetry by showing how it follows from a corresponding theoretical symmetry. The theory then reveals a perfect symmetry. I say what this involves and why it matters, beginning with a puzzle that is resolved by the (...)
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  8. Richard Healey (2013). Physical Composition. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 44 (1):48-62.
    Atomistic metaphysics motivated an explanatory strategy which science has pursued with great success since the scientific revolution. By decomposing matter into its atomic and subatomic parts physics gave us powerful explanations and accurate predictions as well as providing a unifying framework for the rest of science. The success of the decompositional strategy has encouraged a widespread conviction that the physical world forms a compositional hierarchy that physics and other sciences are progressively articulating. But this conviction does not stand up to (...)
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  9.  58
    Richard Healey, Holism and Nonseparability in Physics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    It has sometimes been suggested that quantum phenomena exhibit a characteristic holism or nonseparability, and that this distinguishes quantum from classical physics. One puzzling quantum phenomenon arises when one performs measurements of spin or polarization on certain separated quantum systems. The results of these measurements exhibit patterns of statistical correlation that resist traditional causal explanation. Some have held that it is possible to understand these patterns as instances or consequences of quantum holism or nonseparability. Just what holism and nonseparability are (...)
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  10. Richard Healey (1999). Quantum Analogies: A Reply to Maudlin. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):440-447.
    Quantum mechanics predicted the Aharonov-Bohm effect and violations of Bell inequalities before either phenomenon was experimentally verified. It is now commonly taken to explain both phenomena. Maudlin has pointed out significant disanalogies between these phenomena. But he has failed to appreciate the striking analogy that emerges when one examines the structure of their quantum mechanical explanations. The fact that each may be explained quantum mechanically in terms of a locally-acting, but nonseparable process suggests that the lesson of quantum nonlocality may (...)
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  11. Richard Healey (1997). Nonlocality and the Aharonov-Bohm Effect. Philosophy of Science 64 (1):18-41.
    At first sight the Aharonov- Bohm effect appears nonlocal, though not in the way EPR/Bell correlations are generally acknowledged to be nonlocal. This paper applies an analysis of nonlocality to the Aharonov- Bohm effect to show that its peculiarities may be blamed either on a failure of a principle of local action or on a failure of a principle of separability. Different interpretations of quantum mechanics disagree on how blame should be allocated. The parallel between the Aharonov- Bohm effect and (...)
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  12.  20
    Richard A. Healey, Quantum States as Informational Bridges.
    A quantum state represents neither properties of a physical system nor anyone's knowledge of its properties. The important question is not what quantum states represent but how they are used as informational bridges. Knowing about some physical situations, an agent may assign a quantum state to form expectations about other possible physical situations. Quantum states are objective: only expectations based on correct state assignments are generally reliable. If a quantum state represents anything, it is the objective probabilistic relations between its (...)
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  13. Richard Healey (2011). Reduction and Emergence in Bose-Einstein Condensates. Foundations of Physics 41 (6):1007-1030.
    A closer look at some proposed Gedanken-experiments on BECs promises to shed light on several aspects of reduction and emergence in physics. These include the relations between classical descriptions and different quantum treatments of macroscopic systems, and the emergence of new properties and even new objects as a result of spontaneous symmetry breaking.
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  14. Richard Healey (2002). Can Physics Coherently Deny the Reality of Time? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 50:293-.
    The conceptual and technical difficulties involved in creating a quantum theory of gravity have led some physicists to question, and even in some cases to deny, the reality of time. More surprisingly, this denial has found a sympathetic audience among certain philosophers of physics. What should we make of these wild ideas? Does it even make sense to deny the reality of time? In fact physical science has been chipping away at common sense aspects of time ever since its inception. (...)
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  15. Gordon Belot, John Earman, Richard Healey, Tim Maudlin, Antigone Nounou & Ward Struyve, Synopsis and Discussion: Philosophy of Gauge Theory.
    This document records the discussion between participants at the workshop "Philosophy of Gauge Theory," Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh, 18-19 April 2009.
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  16. Richard A. Healey (1992). Causation, Robustness, and EPR. Philosophy of Science 59 (2):282-292.
    In his recent work, Michael Redhead (1986, 1987, 1989, 1990) has introduced a condition he calls robustness which, he argues, a relation must satisfy in order to be causal. He has used this condition to argue further that EPR-type correlations are neither the result of a direct causal connection between the correlated events, nor the result of a common cause associated with the source of the particle pairs which feature in these events. Andrew Elby (1992) has used this same condition (...)
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  17.  17
    Richard Healey (2015). The Ontology of Consent: A Reply to Alexander. Analytic Philosophy 56 (4):354-363.
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  18. Richard Healey (2004). Gauge Theories and Holisms. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (4):619-642.
    Those looking for holism in contemporary physics have focused their attention primarily on quantum entanglement. But some gauge theories arguably also manifest the related phenomenon of nonseparability. While the argument is strong for the classical gauge theory describing electromagnetic interactions with quantum “particles”, it fails in the case of general relativity even though that theory may also be formulated in terms of a connection on a principal fiber bundle. Anandan has highlighted the key difference in his analysis of a supposed (...)
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  19. Richard Healey (2010). Science Without Representation. Analysis 70 (3):536-547.
    I think van Fraassen is right to see the development of quantum mechanics as a turning point for physical science with a profound moral for philosophy, and not just for the philosophy of science. But the moral is not that even a completely successful physical theory may fail to account for the appearances by showing how they arise within the reality it represents. The moral is more radical: it is that a physical theory – even a fundamental theory – may (...)
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  20.  16
    Richard Healey (forthcoming). Quantum States as Objective Informational Bridges. Foundations of Physics:1-13.
    A quantum state represents neither properties of a physical system nor anyone’s knowledge of its properties. The important question is not what quantum states represent but how they are used—as informational bridges. Knowing about some physical situations, an agent may assign a quantum state to form expectations about other possible physical situations. Quantum states are objective: only expectations based on correct state assignments are generally reliable. If a quantum state represents anything, it is the objective probabilistic relations between its backing (...)
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  21.  43
    Richard Healey (1995). Dissipating the Quantum Measurement Problem. Topoi 14 (1):55-65.
    The integration of recent work on decoherence into a so-called modal interpretation offers a promising new approach to the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. In this paper I explain and develop this approach in the context of the interactive interpretation presented in Healey (1989). I begin by questioning a number of assumptions which are standardly made in setting up the measurement problem, and I conclude that no satisfactory solution can afford to ignore the influence of the environment. Further, I argue (...)
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  22. Richard Healey (1987). Book Review:Open Questions in Quantum Physics Gino Tarozzi, Alwyn van der Merwe. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 54 (1):132-.
  23. Richard Healey (2002). The Arguments of Time. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (3):459-463.
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  24. Richard Healey (2009). Causation in Quantum Mechanics. In Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Peter Menzies (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Causation. OUP Oxford
     
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  25.  18
    Richard Healey (2012). Quantum Decoherence in a Pragmatist View: Dispelling Feynman's Mystery. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 42 (12):1534-1555.
    The quantum theory of decoherence plays an important role in a pragmatist interpretation of quantum theory. It governs the descriptive content of claims about values of physical magnitudes and offers advice on when to use quantum probabilities as a guide to their truth. The content of a claim is to be understood in terms of its role in inferences. This promises a better treatment of meaning than that offered by Bohr. Quantum theory models physical systems with no mention of measurement: (...)
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  26.  86
    Richard Healey (1979). Quantum Realism: Naïveté is No Excuse. Synthese 42 (1):121 - 144.
    The work of Gleason and of Kochen and Specker has been thought to refute a naïve realist approach to quantum mechanics. The argument of this paper substantially bears out this conclusion. The assumptions required by their work are not arbitrary, but have sound theoretical justification. Moreover, if they are false, there seems no reason why their falsity should not be demonstrable in some sufficiently ingenious experiment. Suitably interpreted, the work of Bell and Wigner may be seen to yield independent arguments (...)
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  27.  94
    Richard A. Healey (1991). Book Review:Incompleteness, Nonlocality and Realism: A Prolegomenon to the Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics Michael Redhead. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 58 (3):503-.
  28.  65
    Richard Healey (1995). Substance, Modality and Spacetime. Erkenntnis 42 (3):287 - 316.
  29.  7
    Richard A. Healey, Local Causality, Probability and Explanation.
    In papers published in the 25 years following his famous 1964 proof John Bell refined and reformulated his views on locality and causality. Although his formulations of local causality were in terms of probability, he had little to say about that notion. But assumptions about probability are implicit in his arguments and conclusions. Probability does not conform to these assumptions when quantum mechanics is applied to account for the particular correlations Bell argues are locally inexplicable. This account involves no superluminal (...)
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  30.  35
    Richard Healey (1994). Nonseparable Processes and Causal Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (3):337-374.
    If physical reality is nonseparable, as quantum mechanics suggests, then it may contain processes of a quite novel kind. Such nonseparable processes could connect space-like separated events without violating relativity theory or any defensible locality condition. Appeal to nonseparable processes could ground theoretical explanations of such otherwise puzzling phenomena as the two-slit experiment, and EPR- type correlations. We find such phenomena puzzling because they threaten cherished conceptions of how causes operate to produce their effects. But nonseparable processes offer us an (...)
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  31.  46
    Richard A. Healey (1984). How Many Worlds? Noûs 18 (4):591-616.
  32.  25
    Richard Healey (2004). Change Without Change, and How to Observe It in General Relativity. Synthese 141 (3):1-35..
    All change involves temporal variation of properties. There is change in the physical world only if genuine physical magnitudes take on different values at different times. We defend the possibility of change in a general relativistic world against two skeptical arguments recently presented by John Earman. Each argument imposes severe restrictions on what may count as a genuine physical magnitude in general relativity. These restrictions seem justified only as long as one ignores the fact that genuine change in a relativistic (...)
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  33. Richard Healey (2001). A Novel Defense of Scientific Realism. Jarrett Leplin. Mind 110 (439):777-780.
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  34.  98
    Richard Healey (2010). Gauge Symmetry and the Theta Vacuum. In Mauricio Suarez, Mauro Dorato & Miklos Redei (eds.), EPSA Philosophical Issues in the Sciences. Springer 105--116.
    According to conventional wisdom, local gauge symmetry is not a symmetry of nature, but an artifact of how our theories represent nature. But a study of the so-called theta-vacuum appears to refute this view. The ground state of a quantized non-Abelian Yang-Mills gauge theory is characterized by a real-valued, dimensionless parameter theta—a fundamental new constant of nature. The structure of this vacuum state is often said to arise from a degeneracy of the vacuum of the corresponding classical theory, which degeneracy (...)
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  35.  36
    Richard Healey (2004). Change Without Change, and How to Observe It in General Relativity. Synthese 141 (3):381 - 415.
    All change involves temporal variation of properties. There is change in the physical world only if genuine physical magnitudes take on different values at different times. I defend the possibility of change in a general relativistic world against two skeptical arguments recently presented by John Earman. Each argument imposes severe restrictions on what may count as a genuine physical magnitude in general relativity. These restrictions seem justified only as long as one ignores the fact that genuine change in a relativistic (...)
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  36.  8
    Richard A. Healey (2014). Causality and Chance in Relativistic Quantum Field Theories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 48:156-167.
    Bell appealed to the theory of relativity in formulating his principle of local causality. But he maintained that quantum field theories do not conform to that principle, even when their field equations are relativistically covariant and their observable algebras satisfy a relativistically motivated microcausality condition. A pragmatist view of quantum theory and an interventionist approach to causation prompt the reevaluation of local causality and microcausality. Local causality cannot be understood as a reasonable requirement on relativistic quantum field theories: it is (...)
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  37.  81
    Richard Healey (2008). Review of Tim Maudlin, The Metaphysics Within Physics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (2).
  38.  10
    Richard Healey, How to Use Quantum Theory Locally to Explain "Non-Local" Correlations.
    This paper argues that there is no conflict between quantum theory and relativity, and that quantum theory itself helps us explain puzzling “non-local” correlations in a way that contradicts neither Bell’s intuitive locality principle nor his local causality condition. The argument depends on understanding quantum theory along pragmatist lines I have outlined elsewhere, and on a more general view of how that theory helps us explain. The key counterfactuals that hold in such cases manifest epistemic rather than causal connections between (...)
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  39.  10
    Richard Healey, Quantum Meaning.
    On a pragmatist view of quantum theory, a quantum state has the role of advising physically situated agents rather than representing the condition of physical systems. The advice concerns the cognitive significance of a magnitude claim S: σ has, locating the value of magnitude Q on system σ in set Δ of real numbers. The quantum state offers advice both on the content of a magnitude claim S and on its credibility, provided it has enough content. The advice is authoritative—anyone (...)
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  40.  45
    Richard Healey (1984). On Explaining Experiences of a Quantum World. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:56 - 69.
    Everett's interpretation of quantum mechanics has been criticized for failing to account for what one experiences when performing quantum measurements. This paper investigates the extent of the general responsibility of physics to explain experiences, as distinct from the phenomena that produce them. The conclusions are that while no scientific theory can be required to explain experiences fully, a fundamental physical theory is required to explain how certain actual experiences are possible and that imposing this requirement on quantum mechanics under Everett's (...)
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  41.  46
    Richard Healey & Jos Uffink (2013). Part and Whole in Physics: An Introduction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 44 (1):20-21.
  42.  9
    Richard Healey, Gauge Theory and the Theta Vacuum.
    According to conventional wisdom, local gauge symmetry is not a symmetry of nature, but an artifact of how our theories represent nature. But a study of the so-called theta-vacuum appears to refute this view. The ground state of a quantized non-Abelian Yang-Mills gauge theory is characterized by a real-valued, dimensionless parameter theta—a fundamental new constant of nature. The structure of this vacuum state is often said to arise from a degeneracy of the vacuum of the corresponding classical theory, which degeneracy (...)
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  43. Richard Healey (2007). Gauging What's Real: The Conceptual Foundations of Contemporary Gauge Theories. OUP Oxford.
    This is a prize-winning study of an area of physics not previously explored by philosophy: gauge theory. Gauge theories have provided our most successful representations of the fundamental forces of nature. But how do such representations work? Healey defends an original answer to this question.
     
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  44.  19
    Richard Healey (1992). Chasing Quantum Causes: How Wild is the Goose? Philosophical Topics 20 (1):181-204.
  45.  63
    Stephen Leeds & Richard Healey (1996). A Note on Van Fraassen's Modal Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 63 (1):91-104.
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  46.  41
    Richard Healey (1985). Book Review:Modern Logic and Quantum Mechanics Rachel Wallace Garden. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 52 (4):642-.
  47.  18
    Richard Healey (2013). How to Use Quantum Theory Locally to Explain EPR-Bell Correlations. In Vassilios Karakostas & Dennis Dieks (eds.), Epsa11 Perspectives and Foundational Problems in Philosophy of Science. Springer 195--205.
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  48.  6
    Richard Healey, Quantum Decoherence in a Pragmatist View: Resolving the Measurement Problem.
    This paper aims to show how adoption of a pragmatist interpretation permits a satisfactory resolution of the quantum measurement problem. The classic measurement problem dissolves once one recognizes that it is not the function of the quantum state to describe or represent the behavior of a quantum system. The residual problem of when, and to what, to apply the Born Rule may then be resolved by judicious appeal to decoherence. This can give sense to talk of measurements of photons and (...)
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  49.  4
    Richard Healey (2015). Shaping the Normative Landscape, Written by D. Owens. Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (4):561-564.
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  50. Richard Healey (2012). The World As We Know It. In Philip Goff (ed.), Spinoza on Monism.
     
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