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  1. Richard Huxtable (2013). For and Against the Four Principles of Biomedical Ethics. Clinical Ethics 8 (2-3):39-43.
    The four principles approach to biomedical ethics points to respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice as the norms that should guide moral agents working in the biosciences, and particularly in health care. While the approach is well known, it is not without its critics. In this paper, which is primarily aimed at health professionals and students (from various disciplines) who are studying health care ethics, I consider four problems with the four principles, which respectively claim that the approach is (...)
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  2. Richard Huxtable (2013). Splitting the Difference? Principled Compromise and Assisted Dying. Bioethics 28 (7).
    Compromise on moral matters attracts ambivalent reactions, since it seems at once laudable and deplorable. When a hotly-contested phenomenon like assisted dying is debated, all-or-nothing positions tend to be advanced, with little thought given to the desirability of, or prospects for, compromise. In response to recent articles by Søren Holm and Alex Mullock, in this article I argue that principled compromise can be encouraged even in relation to this phenomenon, provided that certain conditions are present (which I suggest they are). (...)
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  3. Richard Huxtable (2013). Under the Knife and Under the Lens: Ethical Issues in Broadcasting Live Surgery. Clinical Ethics 8 (1):9-14.
    Live broadcasts of surgical procedures are most common at professional conferences, but they are not uncommon in the wider public arena, with operations having recently been transmitted in realtime on public television in the UK. This phenomenon raises ethical concerns familiar from the professional context, along with some distinct considerations which merit further attention. In this article I aim to examine the issues in terms of patient autonomy, patient welfare and the public interest. Prompted by the interest recently expressed by (...)
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  4. Teresa Swift & Richard Huxtable (2013). The Ethics of Sham Surgery in Parkinson's Disease: Back to the Future? Bioethics 27 (4):175-185.
    Despite intense academic debate in the recent past over the use of ‘sham surgery’ control groups in research, there has been a recent resurgence in their use in the field of neurodegenerative disease. Yet the primacy of ethical arguments in favour of sham surgery controls is not yet established. Preliminary empirical research shows an asymmetry between the views of neurosurgical researchers and patients on the subject, while different ethical guidelines and regulations support conflicting interpretations. Research ethics committees faced with a (...)
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  5. Cameron Stewart, Bernadette Richards, Richard Huxtable, Bill Madden & Tina Cockburn (2012). Sale of Sperm, Health Records, Minimally Conscious States, and Duties of Candour. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):7-14.
    Sale of Sperm, Health Records, Minimally Conscious States, and Duties of Candour Content Type Journal Article Category Recent Developments Pages 7-14 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9347-6 Authors Cameron Stewart, Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia 2006 Bernadette Richards, Law School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia 5005 Richard Huxtable, Centre for Ethics in Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TH UK Bill Madden, School of Law, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Tina (...)
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  6. Siow Ann Chong, Richard Huxtable & Alastair Campbell (2011). Authorizing Psychiatric Research: Principles, Practices and Problems. Bioethics 25 (1):27-36.
    Psychiatric research is advancing rapidly, with studies revealing new investigative tools and technologies that are aimed at improving the treatment and care of patients with psychiatric disorders. However, the ethical framework in which such research is conducted is not as well developed as we might expect. In this paper we argue that more thought needs to be given to the principles that underpin research in psychiatry and to the problems associated with putting those principles into practice. In particular, we comment (...)
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  7. Richard Huxtable (2011). Sedation, Communication and Compromise: A British Perspective. Asian Bioethics Review 3 (2):131-136.
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  8. Donna Dickenson, Richard Huxtable & Michael Parker (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook. Cambridge University Press.
    This new edition of The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook builds on the success of the first edition by working from the 'bottom up', with a widely praised case ...
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  9. Richard Huxtable (2009). The Suicide Tourist Trap: Compromise Across Boundaries. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):327-336.
    Amongst the latest, and ever-changing, pathways of death and dying, “suicide tourism” presents distinctive ethical, legal and practical challenges. The international media report that citizens from across the world are travelling or seeking to travel to Switzerland, where they hope to be helped to die. In this paper I aim to explore three issues associated with this phenomenon: how to define “suicide tourism” and “assisted suicide tourism”, in which the suicidal individual is helped to travel to take up the (...)
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  10. Richard Huxtable (2008). Whatever You Want? Beyond the Patient in Medical Law. Health Care Analysis 16 (3):288-301.
    Simon Woods proposes that we ought to re-orientate clinical decisions at the end of life back towards the patient, so as to honour his or her account of their “global” interests. Woods condemns the current medico-legal approach for remaining too closely tethered to the views of doctors. In this response, I trace the story of Mrs Kelly Taylor, who sought to be sedated and have life-sustaining treatment withdrawn, and I do so in order to show not only why Woods is (...)
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  11. Richard Huxtable & Maaike Möller (2007). 'Setting a Principled Boundary'? Euthanasia as a Response to 'Life Fatigue'. Bioethics 21 (3):117–126.
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  12. Richard Huxtable & Julie Woodley (2005). Gaining Face or Losing Face? Framing the Debate on Face Transplants. Bioethics 19 (5-6):505-522.
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