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  1. Richard J. Davidson, Coan, A. J., Schaefer & S. H., Lending a Hand: Social Regulation of the Neural Response to Threat.
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  2. Richard J. Davidson, Nacewicz, M. B., Dalton, M. K., Johnstone, T., Long, M., McAuliff, M. E., Oakes, R. T., Alexander & L. A., Amygdala Volume and Nonverbal Social Impairment in Adolescent and Adult Males with Autism.
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  3. Richard J. Davidson, Amygdalar and Hippocampal Substrates of Anxious Temperament Differ in Their Heritability.
    Anxious temperament (AT) in human and non-human primates is a trait-like phenotype evident early in life that is characterized by increased behavioural and physiological reactivity to mildly threatening stimuli1–4. Studies in children demonstrate that AT is an important risk factor for the later development of anxiety disorders, depression and comorbid substance abuse5. Despite its importance as an early predictor of psychopathology, little is known about the factors that predispose vulnerable children to develop AT and the brain systems that underlie its (...)
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  4. Richard J. Davidson, Dysfunction in the Neural Circuitry of Emotion Regulation—A Possible Prelude to Violence.
    Emotion is normally regulated in the human brain by a complex circuit consisting of the orbital frontal cortex, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, and several other interconnected regions. There are both genetic and environmental contributions to the structure and function of this circuitry. We posit that impulsive aggression and violence arise as a consequence of faulty emotion regulation. Indeed, the prefrontal cortex receives a major serotonergic projection, which is dysfunctional in individuals who show impulsive violence. Individuals vulnerable to faulty regulation of (...)
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  5. Richard J. Davidson, Interoceptive Awareness in Experienced Meditators.
    Attention to internal body sensations is practiced in most meditation traditions. Many traditions state that this practice results in increased awareness of internal body sensations, but scientific studies evaluating this claim are lacking. We predicted that experienced meditators would display performance superior to that of nonmeditators on heartbeat detection, a standard noninvasive measure of resting interoceptive awareness. We compared two groups of meditators (Tibetan Buddhist and Kundalini) to an age- and body mass index-matched group of nonmeditators. Contrary to our prediction, (...)
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  6. Richard J. Davidson, Mental Training Affects Distribution of Limited Brain Resources.
    The information processing capacity of the human mind is limited, as is evidenced by the so-called ‘‘attentional-blink’’ deficit: When two targets (T1 and T2) embedded in a rapid stream of events are presented in close temporal proximity, the second target is often not seen. This deficit is believed to result from competition between the two targets for limited attentional resources. Here we show, using performance in an attentional-blink task and scalp-recorded brain potentials, that meditation, or mental training, affects the distribution (...)
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  7. Richard J. Davidson, Serotonin Transporter Availability in the Amygdala and Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Predicts Anxious Temperament and Brain Glucose Metabolic Activity.
    Jonathan A. Oler,1,4 Andrew S. Fox,2,5 Steven E. Shelton,1,4 Bradley T. Christian, 1,3,5 Dhanabalan Murali,3,5 Terrence R. Oakes,5 Richard J. Davidson,1,2,4,5 and Ned H. Kalin1,2,4,5..
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  8. Richard J. Davidson, Toward a Biology of Personality and Emotion.
    For most of this past century, scholarship on the topics of personal- ity and emotion has emerged from the humanities and social sciences. In the past decade, a remarkable change has occurred in the influence of neuro- science on the conceptualization and study of these phenomena. This article ar- gues that the categories that have emerged from psychiatric nosology and descriptive personality theory may be inadequate, and that new categories and dimensions derived from neuroscience research may produce a more tractable (...)
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  9. Andrew S. Fox & Richard J. Davidson, Subgenual Prefrontal Cortex Activity Predicts Individual Differences in Hypothalamic-Pituitary- Adrenal Activity Across Different Contexts.
    Background: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system activation is adaptive in response to stress, and HPA dysregulation occurs in stress-related psychopathology. It is important to understand the mechanisms that modulate HPA output, yet few studies have addressed the neural circuitry associated with HPA regulation in primates and humans. Using high-resolution F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in rhesus monkeys, we assessed the relation between individual differences in brain activity and HPA function across multiple contexts that varied in stressfulness.
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  10. Sharee N. Light, James A. Coan, Corrina Frye & Richard J. Davidson, Empathy Is Associated With Dynamic Change in Prefrontal Brain Electrical Activity During Positive Emotion in Children.
    Empathy is the combined ability to interpret the emotional states of others and experience resultant, related emotions. The relation between prefrontal electroencephalographic asymmetry and emotion in children is well known. The association between positive emotion (assessed via parent report), empathy (measured via observation), and second-by-second brain electrical activity (recorded during a pleasurable task) was investigated using a sample of one hundred twenty-eight 6- to 10-year-old children. Contentment related to increasing left frontopolar activation (p < .05). Empathic concern and positive empathy (...)
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  11. Antoine Lutz, Julie Brefczynski-Lewis & Richard J. Davidson, Regulation of the Neural Circuitry of Emotion by Compassion Meditation: Effects of Meditative Expertise.
    Recent brain imaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have implicated insula and anterior cingulate cortices in the empathic response to another’s pain. However, virtually nothing is known about the impact of the voluntary generation of compassion on this network. To investigate these questions we assessed brain activity using fMRI while novice and expert meditation practitioners generated a loving-kindness-compassion meditation state. To probe affective reactivity, we presented emotional and neutral sounds during the meditation and comparison periods. Our main hypothesis (...)
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  12. Antoine Lutz, John D. Dunne & Richard J. Davidson, And Thompson E.
    The overall goal of this essay is to explore the initial findings of neuroscientific research on meditation; in doing so, the essay also suggests potential avenues of further inquiry. The essay consists of three sections that, while integral to the essay as a whole, may also be read independently. The first section, “Defining Meditation,” notes the need for a more precise understanding of meditation as a scientific explanandum. Arguing for the importance of distinguishing the particularities of various traditions, the section (...)
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  13. Alexander K. Converse, Elizabeth O. Ahlers, Brittany G. Travers & Richard J. Davidson (2014). Tai Chi Training Reduces Self-Report of Inattention in Healthy Young Adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  14. Heleen A. Slagter, Richard J. Davidson & Antoine Lutz (2011). Mental Training as a Tool in the Neuroscientific Study of Brain and Cognitive Plasticity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.
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  15. Richard J. Davidson, Andrew Fox & Ned H. Kalin (2007). Neural Bases of Emotion Regulation in Nonhuman Primates and Humans. In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press. 47--68.
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  16. Antoine Lutz, John D. Dunne & Richard J. Davidson (2007). Meditation and the Neuroscience of Consciousness. In P.D. Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge. 19--497.
    in Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness edited by Zelazo P., Moscovitch M. and Thompson E. (2007).
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  17. Richard J. Davidson (2005). Well-Being and Affective Style: Neural Substrates and Biobehavioural Correlates. In Felicia A. Huppert, Nick Baylis & Barry Keverne (eds.), The Science of Well-Being. Oup Oxford.
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  18. Richard J. Davidson & C. van Reekum (2005). Emotion is Not One Thing. Psychological Inquiry 16:16-18.
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  19. Richard J. Davidson & Anne Harrington (eds.) (2002). Visions of Compassion: Western Scientists and Tibetan Buddhists Examine Human Nature. OUP USA.
    This book examines how Western behavioral science--which has generally focused on negative aspects of human nature--holds up to cross-cultural scrutiny, in particular the Tibetan Buddhist celebration of the human potential for altruism, empathy, and compassion. Resulting from a meeting between the Dalai Lama, leading Western scholars, and a group of Tibetan monks, this volume includes excerpts from these extraordinary dialogues as well as engaging essays exploring points of difference and overlap between the two perspectives.
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  20. Richard J. Davidson (2000). The Functional Neuroanatomy of Affective Style. In Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press. 371--388.
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  21. Jeffrey B. Henriques & Richard J. Davidson (2000). Decreased Responsiveness to Reward in Depression. Cognition and Emotion 14 (5):711-724.
  22. Richard J. Davidson & William Irwin (1999). Review-Box 1. Conceptual and Methodological Complexities in Neuroimaging Studies of Human Emotion. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):11-21.
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  23. Richard J. Davidson & William Irwin (1999). The Functional Neuroanatomy of Emotion and Affective Style. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):11-21.
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  24. Richard J. Davidson (1998). Affective Style and Affective Disorders: Perspectives From Affective Neuroscience. Cognition and Emotion 12 (3):307-330.
  25. Richard J. Davidson (1998). Introduction to the Special Issue on Perspectives on Affective and Anxiety Disorders. Cognition and Emotion 12 (3):273-275.
  26. Richard J. Davidson (1993). Cerebral Asymmetry and Emotion: Conceptual and Methodological Conundrums. Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):115-138.
  27. Richard J. Davidson, Gary E. Schwartz & D. H. Shapiro (eds.) (1983). Consciousness and Self-Regulation. Plenum.
  28. Richard J. Davidson, Sophie Schwartz & D. H. Shapiro (eds.) (1982). Consciousness and Self-Regulation, Vol. 3. New York: Plenum.
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  29. Richard J. Davidson (1981). Cognitive Processing is Not Equivalent to Conscious Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):104.
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  30. J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.) (1980). The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum.
     
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  31. Richard J. Davidson (1980). Consciousness and Information Processing: A Biocognitive Perspective. In. In J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.), The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum. 11--46.
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  32. Richard J. Davidson (1980). Processing: A Biocognitive Perspective. In J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.), The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum. 11.
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  33. Richard J. Davidson & Julian M. Davidson (1980). Introduction: The Scientific Study of Human Consciousness in Psychobiological Perspective. In. In J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.), The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum. 1--10.
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  34. Richard J. Davidson (1978). Lateral Specialization in the Human Brain: Speculations Concerning its Origins and Development. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):291.
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