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Profile: Richard Kenneth Atkins (New York University)
  1. Mitchell Aboulafia, Victor Kestenbaum, Jason Jordan, Jacoby Adeshei Carter, Sarah Louise Scott, Richard Kenneth Atkins, Christa Hodapp, John Kaag, Shane Ralston & Kipton E. Jensen (2013). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). The Pluralist 8 (1).
     
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  2. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2013). A Guess at the Other Riddle: The Peircean Material Categories. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (4):530-557.
    In “An ‘Entirely Different Series of Categories,’” I argue that aside from Peirce’s formal categories of Firstness, Secondness, and Thirdness, Peirceans should acknowledge a second set of categories I call the material categories. I also argue that the material categories are irreducible to the formal categories. However, in that article I offer no account of what the material categories are. Moreover, Peirce himself never provides a clear and explicit account of them. The present essay attempts to provide an account of (...)
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  3. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2013). Broadening Peirce's Phaneroscopy: Part Two. The Pluralist 8 (1):97-114.
    In the first part of this essay (The Pluralist 7.2, Summer 2012, pp. 1-29), I argued against the Narrow Conception of phaneroscopy by showing that it is not to be found in Peirce's writings and that several passages in Peirce's writings indicate the Narrow Conception is false. As a consequence, we must broaden our understanding of phaneroscopy's aim. In this part, I shall argue that we should broaden our understanding of phaneroscopy's method, that is, our understanding of phaneroscopic observation, description, (...)
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  4. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2013). Toward an Objective Phenomenological Vocabulary: How Seeing a Scarlet Red is Like Hearing a Trumpet's Blare. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):837-858.
    Nagel’s challenge is to devise an objective phenomenological vocabulary that can describe the objective structural similarities between aural and visual perception. My contention is that Charles Sanders Peirce’s little studied and less understood phenomenological vocabulary makes a significant contribution to meeting this challenge. I employ Peirce’s phenomenology to identify the structural isomorphism between seeing a scarlet red and hearing a trumpet’s blare. I begin by distinguishing between the vividness of an experience and the intensity of a quality. I proceed to (...)
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  5. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2012). Broadening Peirce's Phaneroscopy: Part One. The Pluralist 7 (2):1-29.
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  6. Richard Kenneth Atkins, Adam Glover, Katie Terezakis, Whitley Kaufman, Steven Levine, Seth Vannatta, Aaron Massecar, Robert Main & Jerome A. Stone (2012). Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iv). The Pluralist 7 (2).
     
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  7. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2011). This Proposition is Not True: C.S. Peirce and the Liar Paradox. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (4):421-444.
    Charles Sanders Peirce proposed two different solutions to the Liar Paradox. He proposed the first in 1865 and the second in 1869. However, no one has yet noted in the literature that Peirce rejected his 1869 solution in 1903. Peirce never explicitly proposed a third solution to the Liar Paradox. Nonetheless, I shall argue he developed the resources for a third and novel solution to the Liar Paradox.In what follows, I will first explain the Liar Paradox. Second, I will briefly (...)
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  8. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2010). An "Entirely Different Series of Categories": Peirce's Material Categories. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):94-110.
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  9. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2006). Restructuring the Sciences: Peirce's Categories and His Classifications of the Sciences. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (4):483-500.
    : This essay shows that Peirce's (more or less) final classification of the sciences arises from the systematic application of his Categories of Firstness, Secondness and Thirdness to the classification of the sciences themselves and that he does not do so until his 1903's "An Outline Classification of the Sciences." The essay proceeds by: First, making some preliminary comments regarding Peirce's notion of an architectonic, or classification of the sciences; Second, briefly explaining Peirce's Categories of Firstness, Secondness and Thirdness; Third, (...)
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