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  1. Richard M. Gale, William James on the Misery and Glory of Consciousness.
  2. Richard M. Gale (2012). More Modest Ontological Argument. In Miroslaw Szatkowski (ed.), Ontological Proofs Today. Ontos Verlag. 50--165.
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  3. Alexander R. Pruss & Richard M. Gale (2012). The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  4. Richard M. Gale (2010). God and Metaphysics. Prometheus Books.
    God -- On the cognitivity of mystical experiences -- The problem of evil -- God eternal and Paul helm -- A new cosmological argument, co-authored with Alexander Pruss -- A response to oppy and to Davey and Clifton -- Co-authored with Alexander Pruss -- The ecumenicalism of William James -- Time -- Is it now now? -- McTaggart's analysis of time -- The egocentric particular and token-reflexive analyses of tense -- The impossibility of backward causation -- An identity theory of (...)
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  5. Richard M. Gale (2010). John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic. Prometheus Books.
    Introduction -- Part I: Growth, inquiry, and unity -- Problems with inquiry -- Aesthetic inquiry -- Inquiry, inquiry, inquiry -- Why unification? -- Part II: The metaphysics of unity -- The quest for being QUA being -- Time and individuality -- The Humpty-Dumpty intuition -- The mystical.
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  6. Richard M. Gale (2010). The Naturalism of John Dewey. In Molly Cochran (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  7. Richard M. Gale (2010). William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 252-253.
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  8. Richard M. Gale (2009). Review of Bruce Langtry, God, the Best, and Evil. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
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  9. Richard M. Gale (2009). The Deconstruction of Traditional Philosophy in William James's Pragmatism. In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
     
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  10. Richard M. Gale (2009). William James. In Graham Robert Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The History of Western Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 5--13.
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  11. Richard M. Gale (2007). Evil and Alvin Plantinga. In Deane-Peter Baker (ed.), Alvin Plantinga. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  12. Richard M. Gale (2007). The Failure of Classical Theistic Arguments. In Michael Martin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Atheism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 86--101.
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  13. Richard M. Gale (2007). Timothy Sprigge : The Grinch That Stole Time. In Pierfrancesco Basile & Leemon B. McHenry (eds.), Consciousness, Reality and Value: Essays in Honour of T.L.S. Sprigge. Ontos.
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  14. Richard M. Gale (2006). Comments on the Will to Believe. Social Epistemology 20 (1):35 – 39.
    Kasher and Nishi interpret James as holding an expressivist theory about epistemic duties, as well as other normative sentences. On this interpretation, James's claim that we have a will-to-believe type option to believe an epistemic duty winds up being inconsistent. For one can believe only that which is either true or false; but, for the expressivist, normative claims are neither. It is argued that Feldman's essay is not only a wildly anachronistic account of Clifford and James but also is of (...)
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  15. Richard M. Gale (2006). The Problem of Ineffability in Dewey's Theory of Inquiry. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):75-90.
    A Deweyan inquiry begins with an indeterminate situation and terminates, when successful, with a determinate situation, both of which Dewey holds to be unique and therefore ineffable. This ineffability requirement has the disastrous consequences that Dewey’s beloved collective inquiry is impossible and that there are no objective criteria for the success of inquiry. It is found that Dewey’s ineffability requirement results from his misbegotten attempt to aestheticize inquiry so that it is an act of artistic creation. It is suggested that (...)
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  16. Richard M. Gale (2005). Anthony Kenny the Unknown God. (London: Continuum, 2004). Pp. 222. £14.99 (Hbk). ISBN 0 8264 7303. Religious Studies 41 (1):107-111.
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  17. Richard M. Gale (2005). On the Cognitivity of Mystical Experiences. Faith and Philosophy 22 (4):426-441.
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  18. Richard M. Gale (2005). The Cognitive Pragmatism of Nicholas Rescher. Contemporary Pragmatism 2 (2):1-7.
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  19. Richard M. Gale (2005/2004). The Philosophy of William James: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an accessible introduction to the full range of the philosophy of William James. It portrays that philosophy as containing a deep division between a Promethean type of pragmatism and a passive mysticism. The pragmatist James conceives of truth and meaning as a means to control nature and make it do our bidding. The mystic James eschews the use of concepts in order to penetrate to the inner conscious core of all being, including nature at large. Richard Gale attempts (...)
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  20. A. R. Pruss & Richard M. Gale (2005). Cosmological and Design Arguments. In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 116--137.
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  21. Richard M. Gale (2004). Gregory E. Ganssle (Ed.) God and Time. (Downers Grove IL: Intervarsity Press, 2001). Pp. 247. $49.95 (Hbk). ISBN 0 8308 1551. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 40 (2):229-235.
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  22. Richard M. Gale (2004). The Still Divided Self of William James: A Response to Pawelski and Cooper. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 40 (1):153 - 170.
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  23. Richard M. Gale (2004). William James and John Dewey: The Odd Couple. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):149–167.
  24. Richard M. Gale (2003). A Response to My Critics. Philo 6 (1):132-165.
    My reply to my critics in this issue deal with the following issues: God and time, James’ will-to-believe, the free will defense, and the cognitivity of mystical experiences.
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  25. Richard M. Gale (2003). Review of Bruce Kuklick, A History of Philosophy in America 1720-2000. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (7).
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  26. Richard M. Gale & Alexander R. Pruss (eds.) (2003). The Existence of God.
     
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  27. Alexander Pruss & Richard M. Gale (2003). A Response to Almeida and Judisch. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 53 (2):65-72.
    Our new cosmological argument for the existence of God weakens the usual Principle of Sufficient Reason premise that every contingent true proposition has an explanation to a weaker principle (WPSR) that every such proposition could have an explanation. Almeida and Judisch have criticized the premises of our argument for leading to a contradiction. We show that their argument fails, but along the way we are led to clarify the nature of the conclusion of our argument. Moreover, we discuss an argument (...)
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  28. Richard M. Gale (2002). Divine Omniscience, Human Freedom, and Backwards Causation. Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):85-88.
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  29. Richard M. Gale (ed.) (2002). The Blackwell Guide to Metaphysics. Blackwell Publishers.
    " The Blackwell Guide to Metaphysics" is a definitive introduction to the core areas of metaphysics.
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  30. Richard M. Gale (2002). The Metaphysics of John Dewey. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 38 (4):477 - 519.
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  31. Richard M. Gale (2002). Time, Temporality, and Paradox. In , The Blackwell Guide to Metaphysics. Blackwell Publishers. 66.
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  32. Richard M. Gale (2002). William James and the Metaphysics of Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (1):244-246.
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  33. Richard M. Gale & Alexander R. Pruss (2002). A Response to Oppy, and to Davey and Clifton. Religious Studies 38 (1):89-99.
    Our paper ‘A new cosmological argument’ gave an argument for the existence of God making use of the weak Principle of Sufficient Reason (W-PSR) which states that for every proposition p, if p is true, then it is possible that there is an explanation for p. Recently, Graham Oppy, as well as Kevin Davey and Rob Clifton, have criticized the argument. We reply to these criticisms. The most interesting kind of criticism in both papers alleges that the W-PSR can be (...)
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  34. Richard M. Gale (2001). Alvin Plantinga's Warranted Christian Belief. Philo 4 (2):138-147.
    In Warranted Christian Belief, Alvin Plantinga makes use of his earlier two books, Warrant: the Current Debate and Warrant and Proper Function, to show how it is possible for someone to have a warranted belief that God exists and that all of the great things of the Christian Gospel are true even if the believer is unable to give any argument to support these beliefs. Three objections are lodged against Plantinga’s position. First, the alleged sensus divinitatis and the internal instigation (...)
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  35. Richard M. Gale (2000). Swinburne on Providence. Religious Studies 36 (2):209-219.
    My review of Swinburne's elaborate and ingenious higher-good type theodicy will begin with an examination of his argument for why the theist needs a theodicy in the first place. After a preliminary sketch of his theodicy and its crucial free-will plank, its rational-choice theoretic arguments will be critically scrutinized.
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  36. Richard M. Gale (1999). A New Argument for the Existence of God: One That Works, Well, Sort Of. In. In G. Bruntrup & R. K. Tacelli (eds.), The Rationality of Theism. Kluwer. 85--103.
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  37. Richard M. Gale (1999). Atheism & Theism. Faith and Philosophy 16 (1):106-113.
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  38. Richard M. Gale (1999). Ellen Kappy Suckiel, Heaven's Champion: William James's Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (3):417-421.
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  39. Richard M. Gale (1999). William James and the Willfulness of Belief. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):71-91.
  40. Richard M. Gale & Alexander R. Pruss (1999). A New Cosmological Argument. Religious Studies 35 (4):461-476.
    We will give a new cosmological argument for the existence of a being who, although not proved to be the absolutely perfect God of the great Medieval theists, also is capable of playing the role in the lives of working theists of a being that is a suitable object of worship, adoration, love, respect, and obedience. Unlike the absolutely perfect God, the God whose necessary existence is established by our argument will not be shown to essentially have the divine perfections (...)
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  41. Richard M. Gale (1998). Ich Bin Ein “Realist”. International Studies in Philosophy 30 (2):1-17.
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  42. Richard M. Gale (1998). Ontological Arguments and Belief in God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (3):715-719.
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  43. Richard M. Gale (1998). William James's Ethics of Prometheanism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (2):245 - 269.
    According to William James's casuistic rule we are always morally obligated to act in a way that maximizes desire satisfaction over desire dissatisfaction. This maximizing rule sharply clashes with James's strong deontological intuitions, which he expresses in other writings. A key problem for an interpreter is that sometimes James expresses his casuistic rule in terms of maximizing demand (or claim) satisfaction. An effort is made to relate these two different versions of the casuistic rule in a harmonious fashion.
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  44. Richard M. Gale (1997). From the Specious to the Suspicious Present: The Jack Horner Phenomenology of William James. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 11 (3):163-189.
  45. Richard M. Gale (1997). John Dewey's Naturalization of William James. In Ruth Anna Putnam (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to William James. Cambridge University Press. 49--68.
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  46. Richard M. Gale (1997). William James's Semantics of "Truth". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 33 (4):863 - 898.
    James's most original and important contribution was his moralizing of epistemology, in particular belief-acceptance and truth. We are always to believe in a way that maximizes desire-satisfaction, with a proposition counting as true when a belief in it maximizes desire-satisfaction. The theory of truth that falls out of James's pragmatic theory of meaning must be downgraded to a theory of when a proposition is epistemology warranted, thus the reason for the scare-quotation marks around "Truth" in the title of the paper.
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  47. Richard M. Gale (1997). William James's Theory of Freedom. Modern Schoolman 74 (3):227-247.
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  48. Richard M. Gale (1996). Disanalogies Between Space and Time. Process Studies 25:72-89.
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