7 found
Sort by:
  1. Richard Mullender (2014). Ronald Dworkin , Justice for Hedgehogs . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 34 (5):216-221.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Richard Mullender (2011). Hate Speech, Human Rights, and GWF Hegel. In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge. 45.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Richard Mullender (2009). Law, Morality and the Egalitarian Philosophy of Government. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (2):389-411.
    Herbert Hart and the positivists influenced by him have, according to Nigel Simmonds, deflected attention from the question that has always been at the heart of philosophical reflection on law. This question concerns the relationship between law and morality and how we should understand it. Simmonds argues that law and morality are necessarily related and seeks to explain their relationship by reference to an archetype that actually existing legal institutions approximate more or less adequately. He identifies this archetype as providing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard Mullender (2008). On Bullshit; On Truth. Legal Ethics 11 (2):273-284.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard Mullender (2008). Truth, Bullshit and Blame Culture. Legal Ethics 11:273-284.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Richard Mullender (2003). Human Rights: UniversalismandCultural Relativism. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (3):70-103.
  7. Richard Mullender & Alistair Speirs (2000). Negligence, Psychiatric Injury, and the Altruism Principle. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 20 (4):645-666.
    The tendency for judges to respond positively to negligence claims advanced by those who have rendered assistance to accident victims has recently come into collision with the judicial impulse to limit the range of circumstances in which recovery can be made for psychiatric injury. The upshot of this collision is identified as a reduction in the range of circumstances in which those rendering assistance to accident victims can recover for psychiatric harm. This development is criticized on the ground that it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation