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Richard P. Hayes [13]Richard Ph Hayes [1]
  1. Richard P. Hayes, Dharmak¯Irti on Punarbhava.
    Religious doctrines and the philosophical arguments supporting them often become more clearly defined as a result of being challenged by opposing views and counterarguments. Conversely, ideas that are never challenged often remain relatively obscure and poorly defined. The process of encountering rival ideas and alternative theories requires people to re-examine their own assumptions and provide reasons for holding views that could previously be taken for granted. It is not surprising, therefore, that a number of important notions within Buddhist philosophy became (...)
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  2. Richard P. Hayes, Gotama Buddha and Religious Pluralism.
    Buddhism currently enjoys the reputation of being one of the leading voices in a chorus that sings the praises of religious tolerance and perhaps even of pluralism. It is open to question, however, whether this reputation is deserved. The purpose of the present article is to examine whether the teachings of classical Buddhism have a contribution to make to the jubilation over religious pluralism that has become fashionable in some quarters in recent years. It is hoped that this examination might (...)
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  3. Richard P. Hayes, Ritual, Self-Deception and Make-Believe: A Classical Buddhist Perspective.
    Everyone, with the possible exception of those who are really good at it, is personally familiar with the phenomenon of self-deception. Anyone who has been conscious of struggling with a temptation to do what goes against her own better judgment and has then found justification for yielding to temptation is familiar with self-deception. So if I may be allowed to begin with the assumption that most of us have experienced a phenomenon that we would identify as some form of self-deception, (...)
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  4. Richard P. Hayes & Dan Lusthaus, Commentarial Sanskrit.
    It is true for many disciplines within the humanities that there are numerous excellent works that introduce the beginner to the basic building blocks of the discipline, and also many advanced studies for the accomplished scholar, but few works that help the student get from the beginning stage to the advanced level. That has certainly been true of the discipline of Sanskrit. Once a student has devoted a couple of years to working through one of the excellent introductions to the (...)
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  5. Brendan S. Gillon & Richard P. Hayes (2008). Dharmakīrti on the Role of Causation in Inference as Presented in Pramāṇavārttika Svopajñavṛtti 11–38. Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (3):335-404.
    In the svārthānumāna chapter of his Pramāṇavārttika, the Buddhist philosopher Dharmakīrti presented a defense of his claim that legitimate inference must rest on a metaphysical basis if it is to be immune from the risks ordinarily involved in inducing general principles from a finite number of observations. Even if one repeatedly observes that x occurs with y and never observes y in the absence of x, there is no guarantee, on the basis of observation alone, that one will never observe (...)
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  6. Richard P. Hayes (2001). Reflections on Three Recent Works by Sangharakshita. Contemporary Buddhism 2 (2):219-229.
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  7. Richard P. Hayes (1994). Nāgārjuna's Appeal. Journal of Indian Philosophy 22 (4):299-378.
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  8. Richard P. Hayes (1994). N?G?Rjuna's Appeal. Journal of Indian Philosophy 22 (4):299-378.
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  9. Richard P. Hayes & Brendan S. Gillon (1991). Introduction to Dharmakīrti's Theory of Inference as Presented in Pramā $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$}}{N} " />Avārttika Svopajñav $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{T}$}}{T} " />Tti 1–10. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 19 (1).
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  10. Richard P. Hayes & Brendan S. Gillon (1991). Introduction to Dharmakīrti's Theory of Inference as Presented in Pramā $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$$ Avārttika Svopajñav $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{T}$$ Tti 1–10. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 19 (1):1-73.
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  11. Richard P. Hayes (1988). Principled Atheism in the Buddhist Scholastic Tradition. Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (1):5-28.
    The doctrine that there is no permanent creator who superintends creation and takes care of his creatures accords quite well with each of the principles known as the four noble truths of Buddhism. The first truth, that distress is universal, is traditionally expounded in terms of the impermanence of all features of experience and in terms of the absence of genuine unity or personal identity in the multitude of physical and mental factors that constitute what we experience as a single (...)
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  12. Richard P. Hayes (1987). On the Reinterpretation of Dharmakīrti's Sbavhāvahetu. Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (4):319-332.
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  13. Richard Ph Hayes (1986). PT Raju, Structural Depths of Indian Thought Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (8):396-398.
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  14. Richard P. Hayes (1980). Dinnāga's Views on Reasoning (Svārthānumāna). Journal of Indian Philosophy 8 (3):219-277.
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