Search results for 'Richard R. K. Sorabji' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  13
    Richard R. K. Sorabji (1969). Aristotle and Oxford Philosophy. American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (2):127 - 135.
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  2. Richard Sorabji (1980). Necessity, Cause, and Blame Perspectives on Aristotle's Theory /by Richard Sorabji. --. --. Cornell University Press,1980.
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  3. R. Sorabji, T. Brennan & P. Brown (2002). SORABJI, R. Emotion and Peace of Mind. Philosophical Books 43 (3):169-220.
     
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  4. R. Boddy Clive, K. Ladyshewsky Richard & Peter Galvin (forthcoming). The Influence of Corporate Psychopaths on Corporate Social Responsibility and Organizational Commitment to Employees. Journal of Business Ethics.
    This study investigated whether employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) were associated with the presence of Corporate Psychopaths in corporations. The article states that, as psychopaths are 1% of the population, it is logical to assume that every large corporation has psychopaths working within it. To differentiate these people from the common perception of psychopaths as being criminals, they have been called “Corporate Psychopaths” in this research. The article presents quantitative empirical research into the influence of Corporate Psychopaths on (...)
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  5.  18
    Richard Sorabji (1973). Aristotle on the R?Le of Intellect in Virtue. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74:107 - 129.
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  6. R. W. Sharples & R. Sorabji (1983). Necessity, Cause and Blame: Perspectives on Aristotle's Theory. Journal of Hellenic Studies 103:176.
    A discussion of Aristotle’s thought on determinism and culpability, _Necessity, Cause, and Blame_ also reveals Richard Sorabji’s own philosophical commitments. He makes the original argument here that Aristotle separates the notions of necessity and cause, rejecting both the idea that all events are necessarily determined as well as the idea that a non-necessitated event must also be non-caused. In support of this argument, Sorabji engages in a wide-ranging discussion of explanation, time, free will, essence, and purpose in (...)
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  7.  14
    Richard Sorabji (2006). Self: Ancient and Modern Insights About Individuality, Life, and Death. University of Chicago Press.
    Over the centuries, the idea of the self has both fascinated and confounded philosophers. From the ancient Greeks, who problematized issues of identity and self-awareness, to Locke and Hume, who popularized minimalist views of the self, to the efforts of postmodernists in our time to decenter the human subject altogether, the idea that there is something called a self has always been in steady decline. But for Richard Sorabji, one of our most celebrated living intellectuals, this negation of (...)
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  8.  78
    Richard Sorabji (2000). Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Sorabji presents a ground-breaking study of ancient Greek views of the emotions and their influence on subsequent theories and attitudes, Pagan and Christian. While the central focus of the book is the Stoics, Sorabji draws on a vast range of texts to give a rich historical survey of how Western thinking about this central aspect of human nature developed.
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  9. Richard Sorabji (1983). Time, Creation, and the Continuum: Theories in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. University of Chicago Press.
    Richard Sorabji here takes time as his central theme, exploring fundamental questions about its nature: Is it real or an aspect of consciousness? Did it begin along with the universe? Can anything escape from it? Does it come in atomic chunks? In addressing these and myriad other issues, Sorabji engages in an illuminating discussion of early thought about time, ranging from Plato and Aristotle to Islamic, Christian, and Jewish medieval thinkers. Sorabji argues that the thought of (...)
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  10.  77
    Richard Sorabji (1980). Necessity, Cause, and Blame: Perspectives on Aristotle's Theory. University of Chicago Press.
    A discussion of Aristotle’s thought on determinism and culpability, Necessity, Cause, and Blame also reveals Richard Sorabji’s own philosophical commitments. He makes the original argument here that Aristotle separates the notions of necessity and cause, rejecting both the idea that all events are necessarily determined as well as the idea that a non-necessitated event must also be non-caused. In support of this argument, Sorabji engages in a wide-ranging discussion of explanation, time, free will, essence, and purpose in (...)
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  11. Richard Sorabji (2012). Gandhi and the Stoics: Modern Experiments on Ancient Values. OUP Oxford.
    Richard Sorabji presents a fascinating study of Gandhi's philosophy in comparison with Christian and Stoic thought. He shows that Gandhi was a true philosopher, who not only aimed to give a consistent self-critical rationale for his views, but also thought himself obliged to live by what he taught.
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  12. Richard Sorabji (2000). Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation. Oxford University Press Uk.
    'This volume shows enormous learning and contains a wealth of fascinating information, intriguing interpretations and provocative suggestions... there is much here to admire and to learn from. The chapter on the development of the concept of the will is subtle, sensitive and illuminating... an important work, which should interest and stimulate a broad readership for some time to come.' -Mind 'Another brilliant, astounding production, exciting in the breadth of its coverage, terrifying in the scope of its learning... rich, provocative, varied, (...)
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  13. Richard Sorabji (2005). Intellectual Autobiography. In Ricardo Salles (ed.), Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. Clarendon Press
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  14. Richard Sorabji (2006). Aristotle on Memory: Second Edition. University of Chicago Press.
    Richard Sorabji, a noted philosopher in his own right, here offers a new edition of his 1972 translation of _De Memoria_ here with commentary, summaries, and three essays comparing Aristotle’s accounts of memory and recollection. For this edition, Sorabji has also provided a substantial new introduction taking into account scholarly debates over the intervening thirty years, particularly those over the role of mental images in the imagination. “Sorabji has produced a first-class book on an important topic. (...)
     
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  15. F. R. (1664). A Tender Visitation of Heavenly Love, Streaming From the Fountain of Endless Life. Unto the Tribulated Flock of Christ Being Several Epistles, Given Forth, by the One Spirit of Truth, Through Several of the Servants of the Living God; Who Are Called Among Men Richard Farnsworth. John Whitehead. Thomas Greene. [REVIEW] S.N.].
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  16. Richard Sorabji (2002). Emotions and Peace of Mind. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Sorabji presents a ground-breaking study of ancient Greek views of the emotions and their influence on subsequent theories and attitudes, pagan and Christian. The central focus of the book is the Stoics, but Sorabji draws on a vast range of texts to give a rich historical survey of how Western thinking about this central aspect of human nature developed.Stoicism is not, Sorabji makes clear, about gritting your teeth. It can successfully banish stress by showing you (...)
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  17. Richard Sorabji (2014). Moral Conscience Through the Ages: Fifth Century Bce to the Present. University of Chicago Press.
    Richard Sorabji presents a unique exploration of the development of moral conscience over 2500 years, from the playwrights of classical Greece to the present. His virtuoso study of the development of pagan, Christian, and secular conceptions of conscience culminates in a consideration of the nature, value, and role of conscience today.
     
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  18. Richard Sorabji (2014). Moral Conscience Through the Ages: Fifth Century Bce to the Present. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Sorabji presents a unique discussion of the development of moral conscience over a period of 2500 years, from the playwrights of the fifth century BCE to the present. He addresses key topics including the original meaning and continuing nature of conscience, the ideas of freedom of religion and conscience with climaxes in the early Christian centuries and the seventeenth, the disputes on absolution or 'terrorisation' of conscience, dilemmas of conscience, and moral double-bind, the reliability of conscience if (...)
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  19. Richard Sorabji (2006). Self: Ancient and Modern Insights: Ancient and Modern Insights About Individuality, Life, and Death. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Sorabji presents a brilliant exploration of the history of our understanding of the self, which has remained elusive and mysterious throughout the spectacular development of human knowledge of the outside world. He ranges from ancient to contemporary thought, Western and Eastern, to reveal and assess the insights of a remarkable variety of thinkers. He discusses a set of topics which are at the heart of our understanding of ourselves: personal identity; memory; the importance of seeing one's life (...)
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  20. Richard Sorabji (2008). Self: Ancient and Modern Insights About Individuality, Life, and Death. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Richard Sorabji presents a brilliant exploration of the history of our understanding of the self, which has remained elusive and mysterious throughout the spectacular development of human knowledge of the outside world. He ranges from ancient to contemporary thought, Western and Eastern, to reveal and assess the insights of a remarkable variety of thinkers. On this basis he rejects the common idea that the self is an illusion, and develops his own original conception of the self as essential (...)
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  21.  83
    Richard Sorabji (1993). Body and Soul in Aristotle. In Michael Durrant & Aristotle (eds.), Philosophy. Routledge 63-.
    Interpretations of Aristotle's account of the relation between body and soul have been widely divergent. At one extreme, Thomas Slakey has said that in the De Anima ‘Aristotle tries to explain perception simply as an event in the sense-organs’. Wallace Matson has generalized the point. Of the Greeks in general he says, ‘Mind–body identity was taken for granted.… Indeed, in the whole classical corpus there exists no denial of the view that sensing is a bodily process throughout’. At the opposite (...)
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  22.  4
    James Cargile (1965). Review: David Kaplan, Richard Montague, Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic: A Paradox Regained; Martin Gardner, The British Journal of Philosophy of Science: A New Prediction Paradox; K. R. Popper, The British Journal of Philosophy of Science:A Comment on the New Prediction Paradox. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 30 (1):102-103.
  23.  2
    Gabriel Cercel, Paul Marinescu, Andrei Timotin, Delia Popa, Cristian Ciocan, Victor Popescu, Radu M. Oancea, Paul Balogh, Bogdan Mincă, Roxana Albu & Anca Dumitru (2002). Gabriel Cercel: Hans-Georg Gadamer, Hermeneutische Entwürfe. Vorträge Und AufsätzePaul Marinescu: Pascal Michon, Poétique d'Une Anti-Anthropologie: L'Herméneutique de GadamerPaul Marinescu: Robert J. Dostal (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to GadamerAndrei Timotin: Denis Seron, Le Problème de la Métaphysique. Recherches Sur l'Interprétation Heideggerienne de Platon Et d'AristoteDelia Popa: Henry Maldiney, Ouvrir le Rien. L'art nuCristian Ciocan: Dominique Janicaud, Heidegger En France, I. Récit; II. EntretiensVictor Popescu: Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Fenomenologia percepţieiRadu M. Oancea: Trish Glazebrook, Heidegger's Philosophy of SciencePaul Balogh: Richard Wolin, Heidegger's Children. Hannah Arendt, Karl Löwith, Hans Jonas and Herbert MarcuseBogdan Mincă: Ivo De Gennaro, Logos - Heidegger Liest HeraklitRoxana Albu: O. K. Wiegand, R. J. Dostal, L. Embree, J. Kockelmans and J. N. Mohanty (Eds.), Phenomenology on Kant, German Idealism, Hermeneutics and LogicAnca Dumitru: James Faulconer An. [REVIEW] Studia Phaenomenologica 2 (1):261-313.
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  24.  5
    Catherine Osborne (2007). Salles (R.) (Ed.) Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. Pp. X + 592. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005. Cased, £60. ISBN: 978-0-19-926130-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02):332-336.
  25. James Cargile (1965). Kaplan David and Montague Richard. A Paradox Regained. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic, Vol. 1 , Pp. 79–90.Gardner Martin. A New Prediction Paradox. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 13 , P. 51.Popper K. R.. A Comment on the New Prediction Paradox. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 13 , P. 51. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 30 (1):102-103.
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  26. Helmut Kuhn (1979). "Hinweise auf": Interpretations of Plato, hrsg. v. H. F. North; R. Piepmeier: Aporien des Lebensbegriffs seit Oetinger; H. Cohen: Kommentar zu Immanuel Kants Kritik der reinen Vernunft; J. G. Fichte im Gespräch, Berichte der Zeitgenossen; Voltaire: Recht und Politik; Kazimierz Ajdukiewicz: The Scientific World-Perspective and other Essays; Die Philosophie Franz Brentanos; R. Horwitz: Buber's Way to, `I and Thou'; I. Craib: Existentialism and sociology; Richard J. Bernstein: Restrukturierung der Gesellschaftstheorie; K. Acham : Methodologische Probleme der Sozialwissenschaften. [REVIEW] Philosophische Rundschau 26:305-308.
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  27. Donald Phillip Verene (1994). Mary Anne O'Neil, William E. Cain, Christopher Wise, C. S. Schreiner, Willis Salomon, James A. Grimshaw, Jr., Donald K. Hedrick, Wendell V. Harris, Paul Duro, Julia Epstein, Gerald Prince, Douglas Robinson, Lynne S. Vieth, Richard Eldridge, Robert Stoothoff, John Anzalone, Kevin Walzer, Eric J. Ziolkowski, Jacqueline LeBlanc, Anna Carew-Miller, Alfred R. Mele, David Herman, James M. Lang, Andrew J. McKenna, Michael Calabrese, Robert Tobin, Sandor Goodhart, Moira Gatens, Paul Douglass, John F. Desmond, James L. Battersby, Marie J. Aquilino, Celia E. Weller, Joel Black, Sandra Sherman, Herman Rapaport, Jonathan Levin, Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, David Lewis Schaefer. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 18 (1):131.
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  28. S. Nicolas, C. Besche-Richard & N. Quoniam (2000). Conscious Awareness Versus Feeling of Familiarity: The Role of Perceptual Distinctiveness in Remember-Know (R/K) Procedure. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S67 - S67.
     
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  29.  53
    R. Martin (2008). Review: Richard Sorabji: Self: Ancient and Modern Insights About Individuality, Life, and Death. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):223-228.
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  30.  7
    Richard J. Blackwell (1972). "Theory of Knowledge," by J. R. Weinberg and K. E. Yandell. Modern Schoolman 50 (1):139-139.
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  31.  6
    N. K. Rutter (2000). R. B. Strassler: The Landmark Thucydides: A Comprehensive Guide to the Peloponnesian War (A Newly Revised Edition of the Richard Crawley Translation with Maps, Annotations, Appendices and Encyclopedic Index, with an Introduction by V. D. Hanson). Pp. Xxxiii + 711, Ills. New York, Etc.: The Free Press, 1996. Cased, $45. ISBN: 0-684-82815-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (02):581-.
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  32.  7
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2002). Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation by Richard Sorabji, Clarendon Press: Oxford 2000. Pp. XII+499pp., £30.00, ISBN 019-8250053. [REVIEW] Philosophy 77 (1):125-141.
  33. Theodor W. Adorno, Steven G. Affeldt, Rogers Albritton, Alice Ambrose, Erich Ammereller, Alan R. Anderson, Chrisoula Andreou, Julia Annas, Elizabeth Anscombe & Karl-Otto Apel (2007). Bouwsma, Oets K. Braithwaite, Richard Brandom, Robert 33 Brouwer, Luitzen EJ 275–277, 279–280, 284. In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Blackwell Pub. 345.
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  34. J. R. Lucas (1985). SORABJI, RICHARD.: "Time, Creation and the Continuum". [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36:473.
     
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  35. Bruce Seifert, Sara A. Morris, Barbara R. Bartkus, Mark P. Sharfman, Teresa M. Shaft & Laszlo Tihanyi (2004). Smith, Wanda J., Richard E. Wokutch, K. Vernard Harrington, And. Business and Society 43 (4):437-439.
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  36. R. G. Tanner (1973). SORABJI, RICHARD: "Aristotle on Memory". [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 51:180.
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  37.  45
    Hugh Lehman (1966). R. K. Merton's Concepts of Function and Functionalism. Inquiry 9 (1-4):274 – 283.
    In this paper an attempt is made to provide an analysis of the meaning of the term function and related terms as they are used by R. K. Merton in the first chapter of his book Social Theory and Social Structure. Several problems are suggested which must be solved if statements about functions are to be considered scientifically adequate. Secondly the term functionalism is defined and several of Merton's functionalist explanations of social phenomena are stated and criticized.
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  38.  3
    Ole Jensen (2009). Hvorfor kradser klimakrisen ikke mere, end den gør? – K. E. Løgstrups opgør med nominalismen og kantianismen. Slagmark - Tidsskrift for Idéhistorie 56 (56).
    Hvorfor kradser klimakrisen ikke mere, end den gør? – K. E. Løgstrups opgør med nominalismen og kantianismen.
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  39. Richard R. La Croix (1976). Omniprescience and Divine Determinism: RICHARD R. LA CROIX. Religious Studies 12 (3):365-381.
    In this essay I will try to show that there are what would appear to be some unnoticed consequences of the doctrine of divine foreknowledge. For the purposes of this discussion I will simply assume that future events are possible objects of knowledge and, hence, that foreknowledge is possible. Accordingly, I will not be concerned with discussing such questions as the status of truth-values for future contingent propositions or whether knowledge is justified true belief. Furthermore, I will not be concerned (...)
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  40. Richard R. La Croix (1979). Divine Omniprescience: Are Literary Works Eternal Entities?1: RICHARD R. LA CROIX. Religious Studies 15 (3):281-287.
    There are two quite common views which appear to be embraced by a large number of aestheticians as well as a large number of nonaestheticians. It is quite commonly believed by many of both groups that God is omniscient with respect to the future, that is, that God knows everything that will ever occur. I refer to this belief as the doctrine of divine omniprescience. It is also quite common to many of both groups to believe that literary authorship is (...)
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  41.  4
    Daniel W. Cunningham (2012). Scales of Minimal Complexity in {K (\ Mathbb {R})}. Archive for Mathematical Logic 51 (3-4):319-351.
    Using a Levy hierarchy and a fine structure theory for ${K(\mathbb{R})}$ , we obtain scales of minimal complexity in this inner model. Each such scale is obtained assuming the determinacy of only those sets of reals whose complexity is strictly below that of the scale constructed.
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  42.  1
    K. R. Minogue (1981). Method in Intellectual History: Quentin Skinner's Foundations: K. R. Minogue. Philosophy 56 (218):533-552.
    Quentin Skinner's The Foundations of Modern Political Thought is primarily of interest to philosophers not for its excellent account of European thought about the state but for the self–conscious philosophy which has gone into it. It is a rare historian who pauses to get his philosophy in order before he embarks on a major enterprise, though such a policy is possibly less unusual in intellectual history than in other fields. In Skinner's case, however, this order of doing things has been (...)
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  43. J. M. McDermott (1997). Jesus: Parable or Sacrament of God?: An Ecumenical Discussion on Analogy and Freedom with E. Schweizer, K. Barth, and R. Bultmann. [REVIEW] Gregorianum 78 (3):477-499.
    L'exégèse de E. Schweizer dans Jesus : The Parable of God est construite sur un a priori protestant qui rappelle les positions théologiques de K. Barth et de R. Bultmann. La suggestion de substituer «parabole» à «sacrement» comme catégorie fondamentale pour une compréhension de Jésus conduit à considérer les positions catholique et protestante au sujet de l'analogie et de la liberté. Le contraste révèle en fait beaucoup de ressemblances quant à la structure fondamentale de la pensée, et la divergence d'accentuation (...)
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  44. K. R. Minogue (1983). Freedom as a Skill: K. R. Minogue. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 15:197-215.
    The word ‘freedom’ leads a double life. As a rallying cry in the mouths of politicians and publicists, it features in speech acts which inspire men to brave endeavours. Freedom or death are the proffered alternatives, and they are generally linked with fatiguing dispositions such as vigilance. As a philosophical concept , on the other hand, freedom is a territory in which battles are fought about such issues as positivity and negativity, virtue, determinism and the character of the will. There (...)
     
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  45. R. W. K. Paterson (1979). Evil, Omniscience and Omnipotence: R. W. K. PATERSON. Religious Studies 15 (1):1-23.
    There are numerous ‘solutions’ to the problem of evil, from which theists can and do freely take their pick. It is fairly clear that any attempt at a solution must involve a scaling-down of one or more of the assertions out of whose initial conflict the problem arises – either by a downward revision of what we mean by omnipotence, or omniscience, or benevolence, or by minimizing the amount or condensing the varieties of evil actually to be found in the (...)
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  46. Bindu Puri (forthcoming). Gandhi and Tagore on the Idea of the Surplus, Creativity and Freedom: In Conversation with Richard Sorabji. Sophia:1-10.
    This paper is in conversation with Richard Sorabji’s reading of the Gandhi Tagore debate. On Sorabji’s account freedom was an important issue in that debate as Gandhi was unable to appreciate Tagore’s emphasis on individual freedom as creativity. While I agree that freedom was an important issue, I argue that Gandhi understood and employed the resources made available by individual creativity. The differences arose because Gandhi thought of freedom as creativity primarily in moral rather than aesthetic terms.
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  47.  35
    Ricardo Salles (ed.) (2005). Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. Oxford University Press.
    Leading figures in ancient philosophy present nineteen original papers on three key themes in the work of Richard Sorabji. The papers dealing with Metaphysics range from Democritus to Numenius on basic questions about the structure and nature of reality: necessitation, properties, and time. The section on Soul includes one paper on the individuation of souls in Plato and five papers on Aristotle's and Aristotelian theories of cognition, with a special emphasis on perception. The section devoted to Ethics concentrates (...)
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  48. Ricardo Salles (ed.) (2004). Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Leading figures in ancient philosophy present eighteen original papers on three key themes in the work of Richard Sorabji. The papers dealing with Metaphysics range from Democritus to Numenius on basic questions about the structure and nature of reality: necessitation, properties, and time. The section on Soul includes one paper on the individuation of souls in Plato and five papers on Aristotle's and Aristotelian theories of cognition, with a special emphasis on perception. The section devoted to Ethics concentrates (...)
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  49. Richard K. Scheer (1991). Wittgenstein's Indeterminism: Richard K. Scheer. Philosophy 66 (255):5-23.
    Does it follow from Wittgenstein's views about indeterminism that irregularities of nature could take place? Did he believe that chairs could simply disappear and reappear, that water could behave differently than it has, and that a man throwing a fair die might throw ones for a week? Or are these things only imaginable? Is his view simply that if we adopted an indeterministic point of view we would no longer look for causes, or would not always look for causes, because (...)
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  50. Richard K. Scheer (1996). What I Will Do and What I Intend To Do: Richard K.Scheer. Philosophy 71 (278):531-539.
    If one thinks of intentions as entities of some sort, states or dispositions, for example, it should eventually strike him that there are peculiar difficulties with the idea. For example, he will have trouble counting his intentions. In a particular situation, we ask someone, ‘What are you going to do about that? And this?’ And his answer might be, ‘My intention is to pay that, and, as for this, my intention is to ignore it.’ But of course he may have (...)
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