Search results for 'Richard Rufus of Cornwall' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Neil Lewis & Rega Wood (eds.) (2011). Richard Rufus of Cornwall: In Aristotelis De Generatione Et Corruptione. OUP/British Academy.score: 1224.0
    Richard Rufus of Cornwall was an early Scholastic philosopher-theologian who taught at the Universities of Paris and Oxford between 1231 and 1255. In those years he played a vital part in the transformation of philosophy and theology in early thirteenth-century Western Europe. He pioneered the teaching of metaphysics, physics, chemistry, psychology, and ethics. At Paris Rufus gave the earliest lectures on Aristotelian physics and metaphysics of which a record survives. Although acknowledged as a great scholar in (...)
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  2. Rega Wood (2011). Richard Rufus of Cornwall. In. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 1136--1138.score: 1032.0
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  3. Edith Sylla (2004). Review of Rega Wood (Ed.), Richard Rufus of Cornwall. In Physicam Aristotelis. Auctores Britannici Medii Aevi XVI. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (8).score: 1020.0
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  4. Daniel A. Callus (1939). Two Early Oxford Masters on the Problem of Plurality of Forms. Adam of Buckfield — Richard Rufus of Cornwall. Revue Néo-Scolastique de Philosophie 42 (63):411-445.score: 1020.0
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  5. David Flood (2012). Richard Rufus of Cornwall In Aristotelis De generatione et corruptione (review). Franciscan Studies 69 (1):512-513.score: 1020.0
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  6. Joseph Goering (1988). Peter Raedts, Richard Rufus of Cornwall and the Tradition of Oxford Theology.(Oxford Historical Monographs.) New York: Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, 1987. Pp. Xvi, 272. $53. [REVIEW] Speculum 63 (4):984-987.score: 1020.0
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  7. Timothy B. Noone (1989). Richard Rufus of Cornwall and the Authorship of the "Scriptum Super Metaphysicam". Franciscan Studies 49 (1):55-91.score: 1020.0
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  8. David Flood Ofm (2005). Richard Rufus of Cornwall In Physicam Aristotelis (Review). Franciscan Studies 63 (1):531-533.score: 1020.0
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  9. Roberto Plevano (2006). Richard Rufus of Cornwall, In Physicam Aristotelis, Ed. Rega Wood. (Auctores Britannici Medii Aevi, 16.) Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, for the British Academy, 2003. Pp. Xix, 300. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (3):913-915.score: 1020.0
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  10. Roberto Plevano (1993). Richard Rufus of Cornwall and Geoffrey of Aspall: Two Questions on the Instant of Change. Medioevo 19 (1993):167-221.score: 1020.0
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  11. Rega Wood (1992). Richard Rufus of Cornwall and Aristotle's Physics. Franciscan Studies 52 (1):247-281.score: 1020.0
  12. Rega Wood (2009). The Works of Richard Rufus of Cornwall. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 76 (1):1-73.score: 1020.0
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  13. Richard DeWitt & R. James Long (2007). Richard Rufus's Reformulations of Anselm's Proslogion Argument. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):329-347.score: 522.0
    In a Sentences Commentary written about 1250 the Franciscan Richard Rufus subjects Anselm’s argument for God’s existence in his Proslogion to the most trenchant criticism since Gaunilon wrote his response on behalf of the “fool.” Anselm’s argument is subtle but sophistical, claims Rufus, because he fails to distinguish between signification and supposition. Rufus therefore offers five reformulations of the Anselmian argument, which we restate in modern formal logic and four of which we claim are valid, the (...)
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  14. Rega Wood (2001). Richard Rufus's De Anima Commentary: The Earliest Known, Surviving, Western De Anima Commentary. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 10 (1):119-156.score: 474.0
    Richard Rufus of Cornwall was educated as a philosopher at Paris where he was a master of arts. 1 In 1238, after lecturing on Aristotle’s librinaturales, Rufus became a Franciscan and moved to Oxford to study theology, becoming the Franciscan master of theology in about 1256 and probably dying not long after 1259. 2.
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  15. Rega Wood (1992). Richard Rufus of Comwall on Creation: The Reception of Aristotelian Physics in the West. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 2:1-30.score: 438.8
  16. Silvia Donati (2005). The Anonymous Commentary on the Physics inErfurt, Cod. Amplon. Q. 312, and Rufus of Cornwall. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 72 (2):232-362.score: 438.8
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  17. Timothy B. Noone (1997). Roger Bacon and Richard Rufus on Aristotle's Metaphysics: A Search for the Grounds of Disagreement. Vivarium 35 (2):251-265.score: 427.5
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  18. Rega Wood (1993). Distinct Ideas and Perfect Solicitude: Alexander of Hales, Richard Rufus, and Odo Rigaldus. Franciscan Studies 53 (1):7-31.score: 427.5
  19. Richard Rufus of Cornwall (2004). In Physicam Aristotelis. OUP/British Academy.score: 405.0
    As one of the earliest Western physics teachers, Richard Rufus of Cornwall helped transform Western natural philosophy in the 13th century. But despite the importance of Rufus's works, they were effectively lost for 500 years, and the Physics commentary is the first complete work of his ever to be printed. Rufus taught at the Universities of Paris and Oxford from 1231 to 1256, at the very time when exposure to Aristotle's ibri naturales was revolutionizing the (...)
     
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  20. Michael Weisberg (2004). Interpreting Aristotle on Mixture: Problems About Elemental Composition From Philoponus to Cooper. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science 35 (4):681–706.score: 216.0
    Aristotle’s On generation and corruption raises a vital question: how is mixture, or what we would now call chemical combination, possible? It also offers an outline of a solution to the problem and a set of criteria that a successful solution must meet. Understanding Aristotle’s solution and developing a viable peripatetic theory of chemical combination has been a source of controversy over the last two millennia. We describe seven criteria a peripatetic theory of mixture must satisfy: uniformity, recoverability, potentiality, equilibrium, (...)
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  21. Elizabeth Karger (1998). Richard Rufus on Naming Substances. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 7 (01):51-67.score: 211.5
    Some names, specifically the proper names by which people are called, are considered by at least one prominent contemporary philosopher. 1 Looking at the matter from the perspective of medieval philosophy, we might say that the reason such names are semantically ill-behaved is that the act of naming from which they derive is not one of adequate naming. Moreover, supposing that all manner of beings, including people, are we might let adequate naming be governed by the following principle: an agent (...)
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  22. Richard McDonough (2000). Review of John Cornwall's Consciousness and Human Identity. [REVIEW] Metascience 9 (2):238-245.score: 207.0
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  23. Christopher Toner (2011). Evolution, Naturalism, and the Worthwhile: A Critique of Richard Joyce's Evolutionary Debunking of Morality. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):520-546.score: 192.0
    Abstract: In The Evolution of Morality, Richard Joyce argues there is good reason to think that the “moral sense” is a biological adaptation, and that this provides a genealogy of the moral sense that has a debunking effect, driving us to the conclusion that “our moral beliefs are products of a process that is entirely independent of their truth, … we have no grounds one way or the other for maintaining these beliefs.” I argue that Joyce's skeptical conclusion is (...)
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  24. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 192.0
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, Koch (...)
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  25. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch I: Theory of Science and Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):207-219.score: 192.0
    Richard Koch first made his appearance in the 1920s with works published on the foundations of medicine. These publications describe the character of medicine as an action and the status of medicine within the theory of science. One of his conclusions is that medicine is not a science in the original sense of the word, but a practical discipline. It serves a practical purpose: to heal the sick. All medical knowledge is oriented towards this purpose, which also defines the (...)
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  26. James Calvin Davis (2001). Pardoning Puritanism: Community, Character, and Forgiveness in the Work of Richard Baxter. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (2):283 - 306.score: 162.0
    The English Puritan Richard Baxter (1615-1691) developed an account of forgiveness that resonates with twentieth-century virtue ethics. He understood forgiveness as one component of a larger disposition of character developed in community as human beings recognize themselves as sinful creatures engaged in complex relationships of dependency and responsibility, with both God and one another. In the midst of these relationships, persons experience divine and human forgiveness and discover opportunities to practice forgiveness in return. Baxter thus negotiated a distinctive relationship (...)
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  27. Arthur Stephen McGrade (ed.) (2013). Richard Hooker, of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity: A Critical Edition with Modern Spelling. Oup Oxford.score: 159.0
    This is an accessible language edition of Richard Hooker's Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, the major prose work of the English 16th century.
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  28. Jeremy Gwiazda (2010). Richard Swinburne, the Existence of God, and Exact Numerical Values. Philosophia 38 (2):357-363.score: 156.0
    Richard Swinburne’s argument in The Existence of God discusses many probabilities, ultimately concluding that God probably exists. Swinburne gives exact values to almost none of these probabilities. I attempted to assign values to the probabilities that met that weak condition that they could be correct. In this paper, I first present a brief outline of Swinburne’s argument in The Existence of God. I then present the problems I encountered in Swinburne’s argument, specifically problems that interfered with my attempt to (...)
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  29. Kalle Puolakka (2008). Literature, Ethics, and Richard Rorty's Pragmatist Theory of Interpretation. Philosophia 36 (1):29-41.score: 156.0
    This article considers the validity and strength of Richard Rorty’s pragmatist theory of interpretation in the light of two ethical issues related to literature and interpretation. Rorty’s theory is rejected on two grounds. First, it is argued that his unrestrained account of interpretation is incompatible with the distinctive moral concerns that have been seen to restrict the scope and nature of valid approaches to artworks. The second part of the paper claims that there is no indispensable relationship between supporting (...)
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  30. Richard Gaskin (1997). Russell and Richard Brinkley on the Unity of the Proposition. History and Philosophy of Logic 18 (3):139-150.score: 156.0
    Between 1903 and 1918 Russell made a number of attempts to understand the unity of the proposition, but his attempts all foundered on his failure clearly to distinguish between different senses in which the relation R might be said to relate a and b in the proposition aRb: he failed to distinguish between the relation as truth-maker and the relation as unifier, and consequently committed himself again and again to the unacceptable consequence that only true propositions are genuinely unified. There (...)
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  31. Richard Wollheim (2001). Richard Wollheim on the Art of Painting: Art as Representation and Expression. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    Richard Wollheim is one of the dominant figures in the philosophy of art, whose work has shown not only how paintings create their effects but why they remain important to us. His influential writings have focused on two core, interrelated questions: How do paintings depict? and how do they express feelings? In this collection of new essays a distinguished group of thinkers in the fields of art history and philosophical aesthetics offers a critical assessment of Wollheim's theory of art. (...)
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  32. Bernard Linsky (2011). Critical Notice of Richard Gaskin's The Unity of the Proposition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):469-481.score: 150.0
    According to Richard Gaskin, The Problem of the Unity of the Proposition is to explain 'what distinguishes propositions from mere aggregates, and enables them to be true or false' (18).1 This problem arises from the simpler problem of distinguishing a sentence from a 'mere list' of words (1). The unity of a sentence is due to its syntax, a level of structure which is not apparent in the string of words which are uttered or written, and which distinguishes a (...)
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  33. Richard Swinburne & Alan G. Padgett (eds.) (1994). Reason and the Christian Religion: Essays in Honour of Richard Swinburne. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    Richard Swinburne is one of the most distinguished philosophers of religion of our day. In this volume, many notable British and American philosophers unite to honor him and to discuss various topics to which he has contributed significantly. These include general topics in the philosophy of religion such as revelation, and faith and reason, and the specifically Christian doctrines of the Trinity, the Incarnation, and atonement. In the spirit of the movement which Swinburne spearheaded, the essays use analytic philosophical (...)
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  34. Richard Rorty (2006). Take Care of Freedom and Truth Will Take Care of Itself: Interviews with Richard Rorty. Stanford University Press.score: 150.0
    This volume collects a number of important and revealing interviews with Richard Rorty, spanning more than two decades of his public intellectual commentary, engagement, and criticism. In colloquial language, Rorty discusses the relevance and nonrelevance of philosophy to American political and public life. The collection also provides a candid set of insights into Rorty's political beliefs and his commitment to the labor and union traditions in this country. Finally, the interviews reveal Rorty to be a deeply engaged social thinker (...)
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  35. Jay Odenbaugh (2003). Complex Systems, Trade‐Offs, and Theoretical Population Biology: Richard Levin's “Strategy of Model Building in Population Biology” Revisited. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1496-1507.score: 150.0
    Ecologist Richard Levins argues population biologists must trade‐off the generality, realism, and precision of their models since biological systems are complex and our limitations are severe. Steven Orzack and Elliott Sober argue that there are cases where these model properties cannot be varied independently of one another. If this is correct, then Levins's thesis that there is a necessary trade‐off between generality, precision, and realism in mathematical models in biology is false. I argue that Orzack and Sober's arguments fail (...)
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  36. Alan Hájek (2006). In Memory of Richard Jeffrey: Some Reminiscences and Some Reflections onThe Logic of Decision. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):947-958.score: 150.0
    This paper is partly a tribute to Richard Jeffrey, partly a reflection on some of his writings, The Logic of Decision in particular. I begin with a brief biography and some fond reminiscences of Dick. I turn to some of the key tenets of his version of Bayesianism. All of these tenets are deployed in my discussion of his response to the St. Petersburg paradox, a notorious problem for decision theory that involves a game of infinite expectation. Prompted by (...)
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  37. Laurynas Adomaitis (2012). Richard Gaskin: The Unity of the Proposition. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):106-111.score: 150.0
    Richard Gaskin’s work on the problem of the unity of the proposition (“the problem”, henceforth) has sometimes been called magisterial due to its vast historical and conceptual scope. Indeed, the author engages in lengthy discussions of the conceptions of propositions that have been overlooked by most previous investigations on the problem. Not only aspects of Frege’s and Russell’s theories of propositions that appear most problematic are subject to Gaskin’s investigation, it also includes Prabhākara semantics, the approach of Gregory of (...)
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  38. Theodore Sider (1995). Three Problems for Richard's Theory of Belief Ascription. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):487 - 513.score: 150.0
    Some contemporary Russellians, defenders of the view that the semantic content of a proper name, demonstrative or indexical is simply its referent, are prepared to accept that view’s most infamous apparent consequence: that coreferential names, demonstratives, indexicals, etc. are intersubstitutable salva veritate, even in intentional contexts. Nathan Salmon and Scott Soames argue that our recalcitrant intuitions with respect to the famous apparent counterexamples are not semantic intuitions, but rather pragmatic intuitions. Strictly and literally speaking, Lois Lane believes, and even knows (...)
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  39. Jay Odenbaugh (2003). Complex Systems, Trade-Offs, and Theoretical Population Biology: Richard Levin's "Strategy of Model Building in Population Biology" Revisited. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1496-1507.score: 150.0
    Ecologist Richard Levins (1966, 1968) argues population biologists must trade-off the generality, realism and precision of their models since biological systems are complex and our limitations are severe. Elliott Sober and Steven Orzack (1993) argue that there are cases where these model properties cannot be varied independently of one another. If this is correct, then Levins` thesis that there is a necessary trade-off between generality, precision, and realism in mathematical models in biology is false. I argue that Sober and (...)
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  40. Sterling Lynch (2007). Romantic Longings, Moral Ideals, and Democratic Priorities: On Richard Rorty's Use of the Distinction Between the Private and the Public. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (1):97 – 120.score: 150.0
    The heart of Richard Rorty's philosophy is his distinction between the private and the public. In the first part of this paper, I highlight the profound influence that the inherited vocabularies of Romanticism and Moralism have had on Rorty's understanding of both the distinction and the problems he intends to solve with it. I also suggest that Rorty shares with Plato, Kant, and Nietzsche philosophical habits that cause him to treat two importantly different problems as one. Once the moral (...)
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  41. Charles Seibert (2005). Charles Peirce's Reading of Richard Whately's Elements of Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 26 (1):1-32.score: 150.0
    Charles S. Peirce frequently mentioned reading Richard Whately's Elements of Logic when he was 12 years old. Throughout his life, Peirce emphasized the importance of that experience. This valorization of Whately is puzzling at first. Early in his career Peirce rejected Whately's central logical doctrines. What valuable insight concerning logic was robust enough to survive these specific rejections? Peirce recommended a biographical approach to understanding his philosophy. This essay follows that suggestion by considering Peirce's reading of Whately in a (...)
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  42. Joseph M. Bryant (2011). New Directions and Perennial Challenges in the Sociology of Philosophy: Theoretical and Methodological Notes on Neil Gross's Richard Rorty. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (1):3-27.score: 150.0
    Quarrels between philosophers are never entirely disconnected from larger quarrels. There was a hidden agenda behind the split between old-fashioned “humanistic” philosophy (of the Dewey-Whitehead sort) and the positivists, and a similar agenda lies behind the current split between devotees of “analytic” and “Continental” philosophy. The heavy breathing on both sides about the immorality and stupidity of the opposition signals passions which academic power struggles cannot fully explain. Neil Gross’s monograph study on the American philosopher Richard Rorty (1931–2007) is (...)
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  43. Richard McKeon (1998). Selected Writings of Richard Mckeon. University of Chicago Press.score: 150.0
    Richard McKeon enjoys an enviable reputation as an erudite historian of ideas and exegete of philosophic texts. However, the originality and scope of his achievement as a systematic philosopher are less widely known. In this ambitious three-volume edition, of which Philosophy, Science, and Culture is the first, a selection of McKeon's writings will be collected to showcase his distinctive approach to the analysis of discourse. Volume I covers philosophic theory through his writings on first philosophy (metaphysics) and the methods (...)
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  44. James P. Cadello (1988). Richard Rorty's 'Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature': An Existential Critique. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 22 (1):67-76.score: 150.0
    Seeing philosophy as conversation with a number of fruitful avenues of discourse, Rorty seems to be caught in limbo, unwilling to follow through or commit himself to any particular line of discourse for fear of closing himself off to alternative discourses. Choosing to adopt this particular attitude he still has made a choice: he has made a commitment to non-commitment, or as Ortega puts it, “decided not to decide.” Jose Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses, trans. anonymously (New (...)
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  45. Michael R. Dietrich (2000). Of Moths and Men: Theo Lang and the Persistence of Richard Goldschmidt's Theory of Homosexuality, 1916-1960. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 22 (2):219 - 247.score: 150.0
    Using an analogy between moths and men, in 1916, Richard Goldschmidt proposed that homosexuality was a case of genetic intersexuality. As he strove to create a unified theory of sex determination that would encompass animals ranging from moths to men, Goldschmidt's doubts grew concerning the association of homosexuality with intersexuality until, in 1931, he dropped homosexuality from his theory of intersexuality. Despite Goldschmidt's explicit rejection of his theory of homosexuality, Theo Lang, a researcher in the Genealogical-Demographic Department of the (...)
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  46. Richard Kilvington (1990). The Sophismata of Richard Kilvington: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    Richard Kilvington was an obscure fourteenth-century philosopher whose Sophismata deal with a series of logic-linguistic conundrums of a sort which featured extensively in philosophical discussions of this period. This is the first ever translation or edition of his work. As well as an introduction to Kilvington's work, the editors provide a detailed commentary. This edition will prove of considerable interest to historians of medieval philosophy who will realise from the evidence presented here that Kilvington deserves to be studied just (...)
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  47. Keith Simmons (1994). A Paradox of Definability: Richard'S and poincaré'S Ways Out. History and Philosophy of Logic 15 (1):33-44.score: 150.0
    In 1905, Richard discovered his paradox of definability, and in a letter written that year he presented both the paradox and a solution to it.Soon afterwards, Poincaré endorsed a variant of Richard?s solution.In this paper, I critically examine Richard?s and Poincaré?s ways out.I draw on an objection of Peano?s, and argue that their stated solutions do not work.But I also claim that their writings suggest another way out, different from their stated solutions, and different from the orthodox (...)
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  48. Garland E. Allen (1974). Opposition to the Mendelian-Chromosome Theory: The Physiological and Developmental Genetics of Richard Goldschmidt. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 7 (1):49 - 92.score: 150.0
    We may now ask the question: In what historical perspective should we place the work of Richard Goldschmidt? There is no doubt that in the period 1910–1950 Goldschmidt was an important and prolific figure in the history of biology in general, and of genetics in particular. His textbook on physiological genetics, published in 1938, was an amazing compendium of ideas put forward in the previous half-century about how genes influence physiology and development. His earlier studies on the genetic and (...)
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  49. Vincent Colapietro (2013). The Proof of the Pudding: An Essay in Honor of Richard S. Robin. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (3):285-309.score: 150.0
    Among his other contributions to advancing our understanding of classical American pragmatism and, in particular, Charles S. Peirce, none is more worthy of our attention than Richard S. Robin's characteristically painstaking attempt to address the puzzle of Peirce's "Proof" of pragmaticism.1 In this as in so many other respects,2 he shows himself to be, in effect, the student of Max H. Fisch (see especially 1986, chapter 19).3 There are hermeneutical traditions as well as philosophical ones and often the former (...)
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  50. Joshua L. Daniel (2013). Robust Liberalism: H. Richard Niebuhr and the Ethics of American Public Life by Timothy A. Beach-Verhey (Review). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (2):189-192.score: 150.0
    Those most intimate with the works of H. Richard Niebuhr, who return to them time after time for theological and ethical sustenance, know that they exemplify a more interesting thinker than his brother, Reinhold. Of course, Reinhold was and remains the more public figure, read seriously in his time by politicians and theologians, celebrated by our current president, and enjoying renewed scholarly interest resulting in new editions of out-of-print works and a number of critical studies. Meanwhile, H. Richard (...)
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