71 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Richard Scheines [71]Richard Paul Scheines [1]
  1. Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour & Richard Scheines (1996). Causation, Prediction, and Search. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (1):113-123.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   150 citations  
  2. Gregory Wheeler & Richard Scheines (2013). Coherence and Confirmation Through Causation. Mind 122 (485):135-170.
    Coherentism maintains that coherent beliefs are more likely to be true than incoherent beliefs, and that coherent evidence provides more confirmation of a hypothesis when the evidence is made coherent by the explanation provided by that hypothesis. Although probabilistic models of credence ought to be well-suited to justifying such claims, negative results from Bayesian epistemology have suggested otherwise. In this essay we argue that the connection between coherence and confirmation should be understood as a relation mediated by the causal relationships (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3.  70
    Jonathan Livengood, Justin Sytsma, Adam Feltz, Richard Scheines & Edouard Machery (2010). Philosophical Temperament. Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):313-330.
    Many philosophers have worried about what philosophy is. Often they have looked for answers by considering what it is that philosophers do. Given the diversity of topics and methods found in philosophy, however, we propose a different approach. In this article we consider the philosophical temperament, asking an alternative question: what are philosophers like? Our answer is that one important aspect of the philosophical temperament is that philosophers are especially reflective: they are less likely than their peers to embrace what (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  4.  38
    Frederick Eberhardt & Richard Scheines (2007). Interventions and Causal Inference. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):981-995.
    The literature on causal discovery has focused on interventions that involve randomly assigning values to a single variable. But such a randomized intervention is not the only possibility, nor is it always optimal. In some cases it is impossible or it would be unethical to perform such an intervention. We provide an account of ‘hard' and ‘soft' interventions and discuss what they can contribute to causal discovery. We also describe how the choice of the optimal intervention(s) depends heavily on the (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  5.  85
    Clark Glymour, David Danks, Bruce Glymour, Frederick Eberhardt, Joseph Ramsey, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes, Choh Man Teng & Jiji Zhang (2010). Actual Causation: A Stone Soup Essay. Synthese 175 (2):169 - 192.
    We argue that current discussions of criteria for actual causation are ill-posed in several respects. (1) The methodology of current discussions is by induction from intuitions about an infinitesimal fraction of the possible examples and counterexamples; (2) cases with larger numbers of causes generate novel puzzles; (3) "neuron" and causal Bayes net diagrams are, as deployed in discussions of actual causation, almost always ambiguous; (4) actual causation is (intuitively) relative to an initial system state since state changes are relevant, but (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  6.  10
    Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes & Kevin T. Kelly, Discovering Causal Structure: Artifical Intelligence, Philosophy of Science and Statistical Modeling.
    Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes and Kevin Kelly. Discovering Causal Structure: Artifical Intelligence, Philosophy of Science and Statistical Modeling.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   34 citations  
  7. Jonathan Livengood, Justin Sytsma, Adam Feltz, Richard Scheines & Edouard Machery (2010). Philosophical Temperament. Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):313-330.
    Many philosophers have worried about what philosophy is. Often they have looked for answers by considering what it is that philosophers do. Given the diversity of topics and methods found in philosophy, however, we propose a different approach. In this article we consider the philosophical temperament, asking an alternative question: What are philosophers like? Our answer is that one important aspect of the philosophical temperament is that philosophers are especially reflective. This claim is supported by a study of more than (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  8.  22
    Peter Spirtes & Richard Scheines (2004). Causal Inference of Ambiguous Manipulations. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):833-845.
    Over the last two decades, a fundamental outline of a theory of causal inference has emerged. However, this theory does not consider the following problem. Sometimes two or more measured variables are deterministic functions of one another, not deliberately, but because of redundant measurements. In these cases, manipulation of an observed defined variable may actually be an ambiguous description of a manipulation of some underlying variables, although the manipulator does not know that this is the case. In this article we (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  9.  63
    Gregory Wheeler & Richard Scheines (2011). Causation, Association and Confirmation. In Stephan Hartmann, Marcel Weber, Wenceslao Gonzalez, Dennis Dieks & Thomas Uebe (eds.), Explanation, Prediction, and Confirmation: New Trends and Old Ones Reconsidered. Springer 37--51.
    Many philosophers of science have argued that a set of evidence that is "coherent" confirms a hypothesis which explains such coherence. In this paper, we examine the relationships between probabilistic models of all three of these concepts: coherence, confirmation, and explanation. For coherence, we consider Shogenji's measure of association (deviation from independence). For confirmation, we consider several measures in the literature, and for explanation, we turn to Causal Bayes Nets and resort to causal structure and its constraint on probability. All (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10. Cynthia E. Cryder, George Loewenstein & Richard Scheines, The Donor is in the Details.
    Recent research finds that people respond more generously to individual victims described in detail than to equivalent statistical victims described in general terms. We propose that this “identified victim effect” is one manifestation of a more general phenomenon: a positive influence of tangible information on generosity. In three experiments, we find evidence for an “identified intervention effect”; providing tangible details about a charity’s interventions significantly increases donations to that charity. Although previous work described sympathy as the primary mediator between tangible (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour & Richard Scheines (1997). Reply to Humphreys and Freedman's Review of Causation, Prediction, and Search. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):555-568.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Gregory Wheeler & Richard Scheines (2013). Coherence and Confirmation Through Causation. Mind 122 (485):135-170.
    Coherentism maintains that coherent beliefs are more likely to be true than incoherent beliefs, and that coherent evidence provides more confirmation of a hypothesis when the evidence is made coherent by the explanation provided by that hypothesis. Although probabilistic models of credence ought to be well-suited to justifying such claims, negative results from Bayesian epistemology have suggested otherwise. In this essay we argue that the connection between coherence and confirmation should be understood as a relation mediated by the causal relationships (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  20
    Peter Spirtes & Richard Scheines (2004). Causal Inference of Ambiguous Manipulations. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):833-845.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  14.  21
    Richard Scheines (2005). The Similarity of Causal Inference in Experimental and Non-Experimental Studies. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):927-940.
    For nearly as long as the word “correlation” has been part of statistical parlance, students have been warned that correlation does not prove causation, and that only experimental studies, e.g., randomized clinical trials, can establish the existence of a causal relationship. Over the last few decades, somewhat of a consensus has emerged between statisticians, computer scientists, and philosophers on how to represent causal claims and connect them to probabilistic relations. One strand of this work studies the conditions under which evidence (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  39
    Richard Scheines, An Introduction to Causal Inference.
    In Causation, Prediction, and Search (CPS hereafter), Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour and I developed a theory of statistical causal inference. In his presentation at the Notre Dame conference (and in his paper, this volume), Glymour discussed the assumptions on which this theory is built, traced some of the mathematical consequences of the assumptions, and pointed to situations in which the assumptions might fail. Nevertheless, many at Notre Dame found the theory difficult to understand and/or assess. As a result I was (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  23
    Richard Scheines (1990). Independence Relations Produced by Parameter Values in Causal Models. Philosophical Topics 18 (2):55-70.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  34
    Richard Scheines, Causation, Truth, and the Law.
    Deciding matters of legal liability, in torts and other civil actions, requires deciding causation. The injury suffered by a plaintiff must be caused by an event or condition due to the defendant. The courts distinguish between cause-in-fact and proximate causation, where cause-in-fact is determined by the “but-for” test: the effect would not have happened, “but for” the cause.1 Proximate causation is a set of legal limitations on cause-in-fact.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  14
    Richard Scheines, On the Number of Experiments Sufficient and in the Worst Case Necessary to Identify All Causal Relations Among N Variables.
    vertices of a DAG. of K? We assume there are no unmeasured common causes of the N variables, that the system is free of feedback, and that the independence relations true of..
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  27
    Richard Scheines, Combining Experiments to Discover Linear Cyclic Models.
    We present an algorithm to infer causal relations between a set of measured variables on the basis of experiments on these variables. The algorithm assumes that the causal relations are linear, but is otherwise completely general: It provides consistent estimates when the true causal structure contains feedback loops and latent variables, while the experiments can involve surgical or ‘soft’ interventions on one or multiple variables at a time. The algorithm is ‘online’ in the sense that it combines the results from (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  10
    Richard Scheines, A Response Time Model for Bottom-Out Hints as Worked Examples.
    Students can use an educational system’s help in unexpected ways. For example, they may bypass abstract hints in search of a concrete solution. This behavior has traditionally been labeled as a form of gaming or help abuse. We propose that some examples of this behavior are not abusive and that bottom-out hints can act as worked examples. We create a model for distinguishing good student use of bottom-out hints from bad student use of bottom-out hints by means of logged response (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  11
    Clark Glymour, Peter Spirtes & Richard Scheines (1990). Independence Relations Produced by Parameter Values in Causal Models. Philosophical Topics 18 (2):55-70.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  9
    Frederick Eberhardt, Clark Glymour & Richard Scheines, N-1 Experiments Suffice to Determine the Causal Relations Among N Variables.
    By combining experimental interventions with search procedures for graphical causal models we show that under familiar assumptions, with perfect data, N - 1 experiments suffice to determine the causal relations among N > 2 variables when each experiment randomizes at most one variable. We show the same bound holds for adaptive learners, but does not hold for N > 4 when each experiment can simultaneously randomize more than one variable. This bound provides a type of ideal for the measure of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  30
    Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour & Richard Scheines (1991). From Probability to Causality. Philosophical Studies 64 (1):1 - 36.
  24.  1
    Ricardo Silva, Richard Scheines, Clark Glymour & Peter Spirtes, Learning Measurement Models for Unobserved Variables.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  44
    Clark Glymour & Richard Scheines (1986). Causal Modeling with the TETRAD Program. Synthese 68 (1):37 - 63.
    Drawing substantive conclusions from linear causal models that perform acceptably on statistical tests is unreasonable if it is not known how alternatives fare on these same tests. We describe a computer program, TETRAD, that helps to search rapidly for plausible alternatives to a given causal structure. The program is based on principles from statistics, graph theory, philosophy of science, and artificial intelligence. We describe these principles, discuss how TETRAD employs them, and argue that these principles make TETRAD an effective tool. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  37
    Richard Scheines, Clark Glymour & Peter Spirtes, Learning the Structure of Linear Latent Variable Models.
    We describe anytime search procedures that (1) find disjoint subsets of recorded variables for which the members of each subset are d-separated by a single common unrecorded cause, if such exists; (2) return information about the causal relations among the latent factors so identified. We prove the procedure is point-wise consistent assuming (a) the causal relations can be represented by a directed acyclic graph (DAG) satisfying the Markov Assumption and the Faithfulness Assumption; (b) unrecorded variables are not caused by recorded (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  32
    Richard Scheines, The Tetrad Project: Constraint Based Aids to Causal Model Specification.
    The statistical community has brought logical rigor and mathematical precision to the problem of using data to make inferences about a model’s parameter values. The TETRAD project, and related work in computer science and statistics, aims to apply those standards to the problem of using data and background knowledge to make inferences about a model’s specification. We begin by drawing the analogy between parameter estimation and model specification search. We then describe how the specification of a structural equation model entails (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  24
    Richard Scheines, Causation, Statistics, and the Law.
    More and more, judges and juries are being asked to handle torts and other cases in which establishing liability involves understanding large bodies of complex scientific evidence. When establishing causation is involved, the evidence can be diverse, can involve complicated statistical models, and can seem impenetrable to non-experts. Since the decision in Daubert v. Merril Dow Pharms., Inc.1 in 1993, judges cannot simply admit expert testimony and other technical evidence and let jurors decide the verdict. Judges now must rule on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  23
    Clark Glymour & Richard Scheines, On the Number of Experiments Sufficient and in the Worst Case Necessary to Identify All Causal Relations Among N Variables.
    We show that if any number of variables are allowed to be simultaneously and independently randomized in any one experiment, log2(N ) + 1 experiments are sufficient and in the worst case necessary to determine the causal relations among N ≥ 2 variables when no latent variables, no sample selection bias and no feedback cycles are present. For all K, 0 < K <.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  29
    Richard Scheines, Causation.
    Practically, causation matters. Juries must decide, for example, whether a pregnant mother’s refusal to give birth by caesarean section was the cause of one of her twins death. Policy makers must decide whether violence on TV causes violence in life. Neither question can be coherently debated without some theory of causation. Fortunately (or not, depending on where one sits), a virtual plethora of theories of causation have been championed in the third of a century between 1970 and 2004.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  20
    Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour & Richard Scheines, Causality From Probability.
    Data analysis that merely fits an empirical covariance matrix or that finds the best least squares linear estimator of a variable is not of itself a reliable guide to judgements about policy, which inevitably involve causal conclusions. The policy implications of empirical data can be completely reversed by alternative hypotheses about the causal relations of variables, and the estimates of a particular causal influence can be radically altered by changes in the assumptions made about other dependencies.2 For these reasons, one (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  17
    Richard Scheines, N − 1 Experiments Suffice to Determine the Causal Relations Among N Variables.
    By combining experimental interventions with search procedures for graphical causal models we show that under familiar assumptions, with perfect data, N − 1 experiments suffice to determine the causal relations among N > 2 variables when each experiment randomizes at most one variable. We show the same bound holds for adaptive learners, but does not hold for N > 4 when each experiment can simultaneously randomize more than one variable. This bound provides a type of ideal for the measure of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  25
    Richard Scheines, Expert Statistical Testimony and Epidemiological Evidence: The Toxic Effects of Lead Exposure on Children.
    The past two decades have seen a dramatic growth in the use of statisticians and economists for the presentation of expert testimony in legal proceedings. In this paper, we describe a hypothetical case modeled on real ones and involving statistical testimony regarding the causal effect of lead on lowering the IQs of children who ingest lead paint chips. The data we use come from a well-known pioneering study on the topic and the analyses we describe as the expert testimony are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  24
    Richard Scheines (2002). Computation and Causation. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Metaphilosophy. Blackwell Pub. 158-180.
    In 1982, when computers were just becoming widely available, I was a graduate student beginning my work with Clark Glymour on a PhD thesis entitled: “Causality in the Social Sciences.” Dazed and confused by the vast philosophical literature on causation, I found relative solace in the clarity of Structural Equation Models (SEMs), a form of statistical model used commonly by practicing sociologists, political scientists, etc., to model causal hypotheses with which associations among measured variables might be explained. The statistical literature (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  23
    Richard Scheines, Bayesian Estimation and Testing of Structural Equation Models.
    The Gibbs sampler can be used to obtain samples of arbitrary size from the posterior distribution over the parameters of a structural equation model (SEM) given covariance data and a prior distribution over the parameters. Point estimates, standard deviations and interval estimates for the parameters can be computed from these samples. If the prior distribution over the parameters is uninformative, the posterior is proportional to the likelihood, and asymptotically the inferences based on the Gibbs sample are the same as those (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  23
    Richard Scheines, Estimating Latent Causal Influences: Tetrad III Variable Selection and Bayesian Parameter Estimation.
    The statistical evidence for the detrimental effect of exposure to low levels of lead on the cognitive capacities of children has been debated for several decades. In this paper I describe how two techniques from artificial intelligence and statistics help make the statistical evidence for the accepted epidemiological conclusion seem decisive. The first is a variable-selection routine in TETRAD III for finding causes, and the second a Bayesian estimation of the parameter reflecting the causal influence of Actual Lead Exposure, a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  15
    Richard Scheines, Matt Easterday & David Danks (2007). Teaching the Normative Theory of Causal Reasoning. In Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.), Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press 119--38.
    There is now substantial agreement about the representational component of a normative theory of causal reasoning: Causal Bayes Nets. There is less agreement about a normative theory of causal discovery from data, either computationally or cognitively, and almost no work investigating how teaching the Causal Bayes Nets representational apparatus might help individuals faced with a causal learning task. Psychologists working to describe how naïve participants represent and learn causal structure from data have focused primarily on learning from single trials under (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  21
    Richard Scheines, Piecewise Linear Instrumental Variable Estimation of Causal Influence.
    Dept. of Philosophy Center for Biomedical Center for Biomedical Dept. of Philosophy Carnegie Mellon Univ.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  1
    Clark Glymour, David Danks, Bruce Glymour, Frederick Eberhardt, Joseph Ramsey & Richard Scheines (2010). Actual Causation: A Stone Soup Essay. Synthese 175 (2):169-192.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  17
    Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour & Richard Scheines, Automated Search for Causal Relations - Theory and Practice.
    nature of modern data collection and storage techniques, and the increases in the speed and storage capacities of computers. Statistics books from 30 years ago often presented examples with fewer than 10 variables, in domains where some background knowledge was plausible. In contrast, in new domains, such as climate research where satellite data now provide daily quantities of data unthinkable a few decades ago, fMRI brain imaging, and microarray measurements of gene expression, the number of variables can range into the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  14
    Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes & Clark Glymour, Building Latent Variable Models'.
    Researchers routinely face the problem of inferring causal relationships from large amounts of data, sometimes involving hundreds of variables. Often, it is the causal relationships between "latent" (unmeasured) variables that are of primary interest. The problem is how causal relationships between unmeasured variables can be inferred from measured data. For example, naval manpower researchers have been asked to infer the causal relations among psychological traits such as job satisfaction and job challenge from a data base in which neither trait is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  14
    Aurora P. Jackson & Richard Scheines, Single Mother's Efficacy, Parenting in the Home Environment, and Children's Development in a Two-Wave Study.
    Aurora P. Jackson and Richard Scheines. Single Mother's Efficacy, Parenting in the Home Environment, and Children's Development in a Two-Wave Study.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  13
    Wilfried Sieg & Richard Scheines, Searching for Proofs.
    The Carnegie Mellon Proof Tutor project was motivated by pedagogical concerns: we wanted to use a "mechanical" (i.e. computerized) tutor for teaching students..
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  5
    Shane Harwood & Richard Scheines, Learning Linear Causal Structure Equation Models with Genetic Algorithms.
    Shane Harwood and Richard Scheines. Learning Linear Causal Structure Equation Models with Genetic Algorithms.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  14
    Richard Scheines & Wilfried Sieg, Computer Environments for Proof Construction.
    Richard Scheines and Wilfred Sieg. Computer Environments for Proof Construction.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  13
    Richard Scheines & Peter Spirtes, Uniform Consistency in Causal Inference.
    S There is a long tradition of representing causal relationships by directed acyclic graphs (Wright, 1934 ). Spirtes ( 1994), Spirtes et al. ( 1993) and Pearl & Verma ( 1991) describe procedures for inferring the presence or absence of causal arrows in the graph even if there might be unobserved confounding variables, and/or an unknown time order, and that under weak conditions, for certain combinations of directed acyclic graphs and probability distributions, are asymptotically, in sample size, consistent. These results (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  15
    Peter Spirtes, Thomas Richardson, Chris Meek & Richard Scheines, Using Path Diagrams as a Structural Equation Modelling Tool.
    Linear structural equation models (SEMs) are widely used in sociology, econometrics, biology, and other sciences. A SEM (without free parameters) has two parts: a probability distribution (in the Normal case specified by a set of linear structural equations and a covariance matrix among the “error” or “disturbance” terms), and an associated path diagram corresponding to the functional composition of variables specified by the structural equations and the correlations among the error terms. It is often thought that the path diagram is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  7
    Richard Scheines, Unidimensional Linear Latent Variable Models.
    Linear structural equation models with latent (unmeasured) variables are used widely in sociology, psychometrics, and political science. When such models have a unidimensional..
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  10
    James M. Robins, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes & Larry Wasserman, The Limits of Causal Knowledge.
    James M. Robins, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes, and Larry Wasserman. The Limits of Causal Knowledge.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  4
    Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Christopher Meek, S. Fineberg & E. Slate, Prediction and Experimental Design with Graphical Causal Models.
    Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Christopher Meek, S. Fineberg, E. Slate. Prediction and Experimental Design with Graphical Causal Models.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 71