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  1. Richard Schlegel (1982). Gravitation and Mass Decrease. Foundations of Physics 12 (8):781-795.
    Consequences in physical theory of assuming the general relativistic time transformation for the de Broglie frequencies of matter, v = E/h = mc2/h, are investigated in this paper. Experimentally it is known that electromagnetic waves from a source in a gravitational field are decreased in frequency, in accordance with the Einstein general relativity time transformation. An extension to de Broglie frequencies implies mass decrease in a gravitational field. Such a decrease gives an otherwise missing energy conservation for some processes; also, (...)
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  2. Richard Schlegel (1982). Is Science the Only Way to Truth? Zygon 17 (4):343-359.
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  3. Richard Schlegel (1982). Schlegel's Photon Clock Theory: A Reply to Wormald. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 12 (1):89-92.
    Wormald proposes to remove the anomalous absorption of photons in the light clock by making a relativistic correction for absorption frequencies in the mirrors. This would require different corrections for atoms in mirrors 1 and 2, even though both have the same velocity relative to the observer. A relativistic time transformation by direct velocity dependence of time rate is different from a transformation between clocks with Lorentz-invariant proper time readings. With ascription of an invariant proper time to the photon clock, (...)
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  4. Richard Schlegel (1980). Superposition & Interaction: Coherence in Physics. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  5. Richard Schlegel (1980). The Light Clock: Error and Implications. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 10 (3-4):345-351.
    The light clock (a photon undergoing successive reflections between two particle mirrors a fixed distance apart) has commonly been used as a theoretical confirmation of the special-relativistic slowing of clock rates. In order to obtain that result one must describe the clock photon in a system moving relatively to the clock. However, contradictory frequency transformations for the photon, as observed from the mirrors, are then predicted by relatively moving observers. A correct and consistent analysis utilizes the Lorentz-invariant relative velocity and (...)
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  6. Richard Schlegel (1979). Quantum Physics and the Divine Postulate. Zygon 14 (2):163-185.
  7. Richard Schlegel (1977). A Lorentz-Invariant Clock. Foundations of Physics 7 (3-4):245-253.
    Relative distance and velocity magnitudes between two arbitrarily moving particles are independent of an observer's reference frame, and may be used to construct theoretically a clock whose rate is Lorentz-invariant. This result is in accord with the principle of relativity, using the interaction interpretation: Relativistic changes arise in association with momentum-energy transfer, rather than in consequence of velocity-induced changes in measuring clocks and rods.
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  8. Richard Schlegel (1977). The Clock Paradox: Some New Thoughts. Philosophy of Science 44 (2):306-312.
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  9. Richard Schlegel (1976). Interaction, Not Gravitation. Foundations of Physics 6 (4):435-438.
    Cannon and Jensen assert that data from different national time laboratories give a test of the interaction interpretation of special relativity theory. That interpretation is to be applied, however, to clocks in relative uniform motion, and therefore is not tested by the time-rate effects associated with different terrestrial locations of clocks. Those effects are described by the general theory of relativity, and arise with differences in gravitational potential and state of circular motion of the clocks. An argument by the authors (...)
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  10. Richard Schlegel (1975). Superposition in Quantum and Relativity Physics—An Interaction Interpretation of Special Relativity Theory: Part III. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 5 (2):197-215.
    With the interaction interpretation, the Lorentz transformation of a system arises with selection from a superposition of its states in an observation-interaction. Integration of momentum states of a mass over all possible velocities gives the rest-mass energy. Static electrical and magnetic fields are not found to form such a superposition and are to be taken as irreducible elements. The external superposition consists of those states that are reached only by change of state of motion, whereas the internal superposition contains all (...)
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  11. Richard Schlegel (1973). An Interaction Interpretation of Special Relativity Theory. Part II. Foundations of Physics 3 (3):277-295.
    The interaction interpretation of special relativity theory (elaborated in Part I) is discussed in relation to quantum theory. The relativistic transformations (Lorentz processes) of physical variables, on the interaction interpretation, are observation-interaction dependent, just as are the physical values (eigenvalues) of systems described by quantum-theoretic state functions; a common, basic structure of the special relativity and quantum theories can therefore be presented. The constancy of the light speed is shown to follow from interaction-transformations of frequency and wavelength variables. A parallelism (...)
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  12. Richard Schlegel (1973). An Interaction Interpretation of Special Relativity Theory. Part I. Foundations of Physics 3 (2):169-184.
    In the established space-time coordinate-transformation (STCT) interpretation of special relativity theory, relativistic changes are consequent upon the Lorentz transformation of coordinate clocks and rods between relatively moving systems. In the proposed alternative interpretation, relativistic changes occur only in association with physical interactions, and are direct alterations in the variables of the observed system. Since space-time and momentum-energy are conjugate four-vectors, transformation of a space or time variable of a system is to be expected only if there is a concomitant transformation (...)
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  13. Richard Schlegel (1973). Quantum Physics and Human Purpose. Zygon 8 (3-4):200-220.
  14. Richard Schlegel (1972). A Conversation in the Afternoon. Zygon 7 (4):250-268.
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  15. Richard Schlegel (1972). Inquiry Into Science: Its Domain and Limits. Garden City, N.Y.,Doubleday.
     
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  16. Richard Schlegel (1971). On the Self-Consistency of the Steady-State Cosmology: Reply to David Hawkins. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):280-281.
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  17. Richard Schlegel (1970). Statistical Explanation in Physics: The Copenhagen Interpretation. Synthese 21 (1):65 - 82.
    The statistical aspects of quantum explanation are intrinsic to quantum physics; individual quantum events are created in the interactions associated with observation and are not describable by predictive theory. The superposition principle shows the essential difference between quantum and non-quantum physics, and the principle is exemplified in the classic single-photon two-slit interference experiment. Recently Mandel and Pfleegor have done an experiment somewhat similar to the optical single-photon experiment but with two independently operated lasers; interference is obtained even with beam intensity (...)
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  18. Richard Schlegel (1967). Book Review:Symmetries and Reflections: Scientific Essays of Eugene P. Wigner Walter J. Moore, Michael Scriven. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 34 (4):383-.
  19. Richard Schlegel (1967). Completeness in Science. New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts.
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  20. Richard Schlegel (1965). The Problem of Infinite Matter in Steady-State Cosmology. Philosophy of Science 32 (1):21-31.
    The creation-of-matter hypothesis of the Bondi-Gold-Hoyle steady-state cosmology requires that in an infinite time to which the first transfinite number may be assigned the number of atoms of matter produced would be equal to the cardinal number of the set of mathematical points in the continuum. The existence of a set of finite atoms with that cardinal number is physically unacceptable. The argument for the production of a non-denumerable set of atoms, in infinite time, is given in terms of a (...)
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  21. Richard Schlegel (1963). Light Velocity in the Interaction Interpretation of Relativity Theory. Review of Metaphysics 17 (2):286 - 288.
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  22. Richard Schlegel (1961). Mario Bunge on Causality. Philosophy of Science 28 (1):72-82.
  23. Richard Schlegel (1961/1968). Time and the Physical World. New York, Dover Publications.
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  24. Richard Schlegel (1954). The Age of the Universe. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (19):226-236.
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  25. Richard Schlegel (1948). Atemporal Processes in Physics. Philosophy of Science 15 (1):25-35.
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