8 found
Sort by:
  1. Richard T. Peterson (2012). Thinking About Violence in a Violent World. Radical Philosophy Review 15 (2):411-415.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Richard T. Peterson (2011). Violence and Historical Learning: Thinking with Robert Pippin's Hegel. Inquiry 53 (5):417-434.
    Pippin offers his reconstruction of Hegel's account of practical reason as a point of departure for contemporary social theory, yet he does not address the implications for us of Hegel's claim that social reflection can achieve its knowledge only on the basis of a world that has already become rational. After arguing that the unreasonableness of our world can be seen from the suffering it generates, I argue that an account of violence may be a way to retrieve the promise (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Richard T. Peterson (2006). Human Rights and the Politics of Neo-Colonial Intervention. Radical Philosophy Today 2006:211-234.
    What kind of ethical perspective is available for criticizing policies like the U.S. intervention in Iraq? Though human rights seems to offer a framework suited to this kind of global politics, the realities of the neo-colonial world bring the viability of its universality into question. Democratic responsibility may offer a bridging perspective, though it too lacks convincing embodiment. Exploration of the preconditions for assuming such responsibility does help us grasp some political features of the required agency and also helps us (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard T. Peterson (2004). Human Rights and Cultural Conflict. Human Rights Review 5 (3):22-32.
    In speaking of a right in relation to identity formation, I have avoided many important questions, including questions about how properly to understand identity formation itself. Evoking such a right does draw from existing trends, but it remains speculative. Nonetheless, it captures one valuable insight in criticisms of human rights as a Western imposition, namely the insight that an important kind of oppression figures in the imposition of identities. By affirming a human right in relation to identity formation, we can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard T. Peterson (1996). Democratic Philosophy and the Politics of Knowledge. Penn State University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Richard T. Peterson (1991). The Specter of the Absurd: Sources and Criticisms of Modern Nihilism. By Donald A. Crosby. The Modern Schoolman 69 (1):66-67.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard T. Peterson (1990). Deconstruction and Philosophy: The Texts of Jacques Derrida. Edited by John Sallis. The Modern Schoolman 67 (2):166-168.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Stephen L. Esquith & Richard T. Peterson (1988). The Original Position as Social Practice. Political Theory 16 (2):300-334.