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  1. Richard Tuck (2004). The Utopianism of Leviathan. In Tom Sorell & Luc Foisneau (eds.), Leviathan After 350 Years. Clarendon Press.
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  2. Richard Tuck (2002). Hobbes: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) was the first great English political philosopher, and his book Leviathan was one of the first truly modern works of philosophy. Richard Tuck shows that while Hobbes may indeed have been an atheist, he was far from pessimistic about human nature, nor did he advocate totalitarianism. By locating him against the context of his age, we learn that Hobbes developed a theory of knowledge which rivaled that of Descartes in its importance for the formation of modern philosophy.
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  3. Richard Tuck (2000). Hobbes and Tacitus. In G. A. J. Rogers & Tom Sorell (eds.), Hobbes and History. Routledge. 99--111.
     
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  4. Patchen Markell Lukes, Pratap Mehta, Jim Miller, Anthony Pagden, Jennifer Pitts, Melvin Richter, Patrick Riley, Richard Tuck & Linda Zerilli (1999). Anti-Imperialism*/Bysankarmuthu. Social Research 66 (4).
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  5. Richard Tuck (1999). The Rights of War and Peace: Political Thought and the International Order From Grotius to Kant. Clarendon Press.
    The Rights of War and Peace is the first fully historical account of the formative period of modern theories of international law. It sets the scene with an extensive history of the theory of international relations from antiquity down to the seventeenth century. Professor Tuck then examines the arguments over the moral basis for war and international aggression, and links the debates to the writings of the great political theorists such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant. -/- This is not (...)
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  6. Richard Tuck (1996). 8 Hobbes's Moral Philosophy. In Tom Sorell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hobbes. Cambridge University Press. 175.
  7. Richard Tuck (1994). Rights and Pluralism. In Charles Taylor, James Tully & Daniel M. Weinstock (eds.), Philosophy in an Age of Pluralism: The Philosophy of Charles Taylor in Question. Cambridge University Press. 14--15.
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  8. Richard Tuck (1993). Philosophy and Government, 1572-1651. Cambridge University Press.
    This major new contribution to our understanding of European political theory will challenge the perspectives in which political thought is understood. Framed as a general account of the period between 1572 and 1651 it charts the formation of a distinctively modern political vocabulary, based on arguments of political necessity and raison d'etat in the work of the major theorists. While Dr. Tuck pays detailed attention to Montaigne, Grotius, Hobbes and the theorists of the English Revolution, he also reconsiders the origins (...)
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  9. Richard Tuck (1992). Hobbes. In Quentin Skinner (ed.), Great Political Thinkers. Oxford University Press.
     
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  10. Richard Tuck (1988). Descartes and Hobbes. In G. A. J. Rogers & Alan Ryan (eds.), Perspectives on Thomas Hobbes. Oxford University Press. 11--41.
     
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  11. Richard Tuck (1988). Hobbes and Descartes. In G. A. J. Rogers & Alan Ryan (eds.), Perspectives on Thomas Hobbes. Oxford University Press.
  12. Richard Tuck (1988). Optics and Sceptics: The Philosophical Foundations of Hobbes's Political Thought. In Edmund Leites (ed.), Conscience and Casuistry in Early Modern Europe. Editions de la Maison des Sciences de L'homme. 235--63.
     
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  13. Richard Tuck (1986). Peter Haggenmacher, Grotius Et La Doctrine De La Guerre Juste. Grotiana 7 (1):87-92.
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  14. Richard Tuck (1983). Grotius, Carneades and Hobbes. Grotiana 4 (1):43-62.
  15. Richard Tuck (1979). Natural Rights Theories: Their Origin and Development. Cambridge University Press.
    This book shows how political argument in terms of rights and natural rights began in medieval Europe, and how the theory of natural rights was developed in the seventeenth century after a period of neglect in the Renaissance. Dr Tuck provides a new understanding of the importance of Jean Gerson in the formation of the theories, and of Hugo Grotius in their development; he also restores the Englishman John Selden's ideas to the prominence they once enjoyed, and shows how Thomas (...)
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