Search results for 'Right to die Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Richard Walker (1997). A Right to Die? Franklin Watts.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Robert F. Weir (1989). Abating Treatment with Critically Ill Patients: Ethical and Legal Limits to the Medical Prolongation of Life. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers an in-depth analysis of the wide range of issues surrounding "passive euthanasia" and "allow-to-die" decisions. The author develops a comprehensive conceptual model that is highly useful for assessing and dealing with real-life situations. He presents an informative historical overview, an evaluation of the clinical settings in which treatment abatement takes place, and an insightful discussion of relevant legal aspects. The result is a clearly articulated ethical analysis that is medically realistic, philosophically sound, and legally viable.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  3.  7
    C. G. Prado (2008). Choosing to Die: Elective Death and Multiculturalism. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, C. G. Prado addresses the difficult question of when and whether it is rational to end one’s life in order to escape devastating terminal illness. He specifically considers this question in light of the impact of multiculturalism on perceptions and judgments about what is right and wrong, permissible and impermissible. Prado introduces the idea of a “coincidental culture” to clarify the variety of values and commitments that influence decision. He also introduces the idea of a “proxy (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  9
    M. Luchetti (2010). Eluana Englaro, Chronicle of a Death Foretold: Ethical Considerations on the Recent Right-to-Die Case in Italy. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (6):333-335.
    In 1992, Eluana Englaro was involved in a car accident in Italy that eventually left her in a permanent vegetative state requiring artificial nutrition and hydration. This paper, after briefly reviewing Eluana's case, gives a chronicle of Eluana last months until her death on 9 February 2009, and discusses the right-to-die controversy in Italy. For many years, Mr Englaro, Eluana's father, would litigate to enforce what he considered to be his daughter's wish to discontinue life-prolonging treatment. In July 2008, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.) (2009). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    The case of Terri Schiavo, a young woman who spent 15 years in a persistent vegetative state, has emerged as a watershed in debates over end-of-life care. While many observers had thought the right to refuse medical treatment was well established, this case split a family, divided a nation, and counfounded physicians, legislators, and many of the people they treated or represented. In renewing debates over the importance of advance directives, the appropriate role of artificial hydration and nutrition, and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  10
    Richard Walker (2006). The Right to Die? Sea to Sea Publications.
    Discusses the moral and ethical aspects of euthanasia and related topics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  59
    Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. Eduardo Luiz Santos Cabette (2009). Eutanásia E Ortotanásia: Comentários à Resolução 1,805/06 Cfm: Aspectos Éticos E Jurídicos. Juruá Editora.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Mario Coltorti (ed.) (2004). Medicina Ed Etica di Fine Vita: Atti Del Convegno, Napoli, 22-24 Aprile 2004. Giannini.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Hamide Tacir (2011). Hastanın Kendi Geleceğini Belirleme Hakkı. Xii Levha.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. O. S. Kapinus (2006). Ėvtanazii͡a Kak Sot͡sialʹno-Pravovoe I͡avlenie. Bukvoved.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Ricardo Vaca Andrade (ed.) (2009). Eutanasia: Aspectos Éticos-Médicos y Jurídicos: La Bioética y Los Conflictos En Los Confines de la Vida. Universidad de Konstanz de Alemania.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Ping Wang (2005). Si Wang Yu Yi Xue Lun Li. Wuhan da Xue Chu Ban She.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  20
    Frédéric Gilbert & Susan Dodds (2014). Is There a Moral Obligation to Develop Brain Implants Involving NanoBionic Technologies? Ethical Issues for Clinical Trials. NanoEthics 8 (1):49-56.
    In their article published in Nanoethics, “Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques”, Berger et al. suggest that there may be a prima facie moral obligation to improve neuro implants with nanotechnology given their possible therapeutic advantages for patients [Nanoethics, 2:241–249]. Although we agree with Berger et al. that developments in nanomedicine hold the potential to render brain implant technologies less invasive and to better target neural stimulation to respond to brain impairments (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  4
    Charles L. Sprung, Leonid A. Eidelman & Avraham Steinberg (1997). Is the Patient's Right to Die Evolving Into a Duty to Die?: Medical Decision Making and Ethical Evaluations in Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (1):69-75.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  3
    H. McHaffie (2009). Why I Wrote ... Holding On? Vacant Possession, Paternity, Double Trouble, Right to Die - Novels Addressing Key Medical Ethical Dilemmas. Clinical Ethics 4 (4):213-216.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. David Anderson, Robert Cavalier & Preston Covey (1996). A Right to Die?: The Dax Cowart Case an Ethical Case Study on Cd-Rom. Routledge.
    First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Karl-Wilhelm Merks (1994). Das Recht Anders Zu Sein: Eine Chance Für Die Moral -The Right to Be Different: A Chance for the Moral. Bijdragen 55 (1):2-23.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Robert M. Veatch (1981). Ethical Aspects of the Right to Health Care. In Marc D. Hiller (ed.), Medical Ethics and the Law: Implications for Public Policy. Ballinger Pub. Co.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Norman Daniels (2008). Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly. Cambridge University Press.
    In this new book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: What is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? The theory has implications for national and global health policy: Can we meet health needs fairly in aging societies? Or protect health in the workplace while respecting individual (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   87 citations  
  21.  25
    Volkert Beekman & Frans W. A. Brom (2007). Ethical Tools to Support Systematic Public Deliberations About the Ethical Aspects of Agricultural Biotechnologies. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):3-12.
    This special issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics presents so-called ethical tools that are developed to support systematic public deliberations about the ethical aspects of agricultural biotechnologies. This paper firstly clarifies the intended connotations of the term “ethical tools” and argues that such tools can support liberal democracies to cope with the issues that are raised by the application of genetic modification and other modern biotechnologies in agriculture and food production. The paper secondly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  22.  22
    J. Angelo Corlett (2001). Is There a Moral Duty to Die? Health Care Analysis 9 (1):41-63.
    In recent years, there has been a great deal of philosophical discussion about the alleged moral right to die. If there is such a moral right, then it would seem to imply a moral duty on others to not interfere with the exercise of the right. And this might have important implications for public policy insofar as public policy ought to track what is morally right.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  13
    William Bülow (2014). Treating Inmates as Moral Agents: A Defense of the Right to Privacy in Prison. Criminal Justice Ethics 33 (1):1-20.
    This paper addresses the question of prison inmates' right to privacy from an ethical perspective. I argue that the right to privacy is important because of its connection to moral agency and that the protection of privacy is warranted by different established philosophical theories about the justification of legal punishment. I discuss the practical implications of this argument by addressing two potential problems. First, how much privacy should be allowed during imprisonment in order to meet the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  22
    L. Syd M. Johnson (2011). The Right to Die in the Minimally Conscious State. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (37):175-178.
    The right to die has for decades been recognised for persons in a vegetative state, but there remains controversy about ending life-sustaining medical treatment for persons in the minimally conscious state (MCS). The controversy is rooted in assumptions about the moral significance of consciousness, and the value of life for patients who are conscious and not terminally ill. This paper evaluates these assumptions in light of evidence that generates concerns about quality of life in the MCS. It is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25.  54
    Joel Feinberg (1991). Overlooking the Merits of the Individual Case: An Unpromising Approach to the Right to Die. Ratio Juris 4 (2):131-151.
    .One of the strongest arguments against the legalization of voluntary euthanasia is that even though a given suffering or comatose patient may have a moral right to die, legal recognition of the right would lead inevitably to mistakes and abuses in other cases. The flaw in this argument is the assumption that it is always and necessarily a greater evil to let someone die by mistake than to keep a person alive by mistake. In fact, we cannot (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  48
    Raphael Cohen-Almagor (1995). Autonomy, Life as an Intrinsic Value, and the Right to Die in Dignity. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):261-272.
    This paper examines two models of thinking relating to the issue of the right to die in dignity: one takes into consideration the rights and interests of the individual; the other supposes that human life is inherently valuable. I contend that preference should be given to the first model, and further assert that the second model may be justified in moral terms only as long as it does not resort to paternalism. The view that holds that certain patients (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Rosangela Barcaro (2001). The Right to Die Debate: A Survey. Global Bioethics 14 (1): 85-90.
    In the present article the concept of the right to die will be analyzed in English and American literature between 1990 and 1994.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  7
    Dr Raphael Cohen-Almagor (1995). Autonomy, Life as an Intrinsic Value, and the Right to Die in Dignity. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):261-272.
    This paper examines two models of thinking relating to the issue of the right to die in dignity: one takes into consideration the rights and interests of the individual; the other supposes that human life is inherently valuable. I contend that preference should be given to the first model, and further assert that the second model may be justified in moral terms only as long as it does not resort to paternalism. The view that holds that certain patients (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  7
    Dorothea P. Touwen (2011). Egg Cell Preservation and the Right to Die in The Netherlands: Citizens' Choices and the Limits of Medicine. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):449-457.
    It is a funny thing with the Dutch. On one hand, they seem preoccupied with death and adamant that patients be allowed to decide for themselves in what way they want to die. On the other, contrary to popular belief, the Dutch physician is allotted a very influential role in treatment decisions, far more prominent than in many other Western countries. From an American perspective Dutch professional ethics may seem quite paternalistic: a patient’s freedom to decide to have a particular (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Elvio Baccarini (2004). The Right to Die with Dignity. A Discussion of Cohen-Almagor's Book. Etica E Politica 6 (2):1-11.
    Cohen-Almagor's book represents a remarkable contribution to the discussion of the right to die with dignity. It offers the discussion of a wide range of topics. They include: the terminology respectful of human dignity ; the question of autonomy; the sanctity-of life – quality of life debate; criticism of some extreme quality-of-life position; criticism of Ronald Dworkin's distinction between critical and experiential interests and the consequences this author draws from it; active and passive euthanasia; the Dutch experience and the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  43
    Edmund Wall (2011). Privacy and the Moral Right to Personal Autonomy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):69-85.
    I argue that the moral right to privacy is the moral right to consent to access by others to one’s personal information. Although this thesis is relatively simple and already implicit in considerations about privacy, it has, nevertheless, been overlooked by philosophers. In the paper, I present and defend my account of the moral right to privacy, respond to possible objections to it, and attempt to show its advantages over two recent accounts: one by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  7
    Eileen Morgan (1998). Navigating Cross-Cultural Ethics: What Global Managers Do Right to Keep From Going Wrong. Butterworth-Heinemann.
    Through the personal stories of managers running global business, this book takes an inside look into the dilemmas of managers who are asked to make profits ethically according to the dictates of their company's ethics code. It examines what companies `think" they are doing to help managers in those situations and how those managers are actually affected. Thanks to the boost from the 1991 Sentencing Guidelines which minimizes penalties for companies with ethics codes caught in ethical wrongdoing, more than (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  33.  5
    M. R. N. Bruijnis, V. Blok, E. N. Stassen & H. G. J. Gremmen (2015). Moral “Lock-In” in Responsible Innovation: The Ethical and Social Aspects of Killing Day-Old Chicks and Its Alternatives. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):939-960.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that will help in understanding and evaluating, along social and ethical lines, the issue of killing day-old male chicks and two alternative directions of responsible innovations to solve this issue. The following research questions are addressed: Why is the killing of day-old chicks morally problematic? Are the proposed alternatives morally sound? To what extent do the alternatives lead to responsible innovation? The conceptual framework demonstrates clearly that there is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  10
    Maria M. Wolter (2013). Examining the Need to Complement Karol Wojtyła's Ethical Personalism Through an Ethics of Inner Responses, Fundamental Moral Attitudes, and Virtues. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):97-115.
    An objection has been raised that Karol Wojtyła presents an ethical system heavily centered on actions and deeds. With the exception of his occasional references to the virtue of chastity in Love and Responsibility and his first writing on Saint John, some of the most central themes of ancient and medieval, as well as of contemporary, ethics seem almost entirely absent. In the following article, we will turn to Wojtyła’s most important philosophical work, The Acting Person, to glean from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  22
    G. T. Laurie (2002). Genetic Privacy: A Challenge to Medico-Legal Norms. Cambridge University Press.
    The phenomenon of the New Genetics raises complex social problems, particularly those of privacy. This book offers ethical and legal perspectives on the questions of a right to know and not to know genetic information from the standpoint of individuals, their relatives, employers, insurers and the state. Graeme Laurie provides a unique definition of privacy, including a concept of property rights in the person, and argues for stronger legal protection of privacy in the shadow of developments in human (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  36.  31
    Thomas Douglas (2014). Criminal Rehabilitation Through Medical Intervention: Moral Liability and the Right to Bodily Integrity. Journal of Ethics 18 (2):101-122.
    Criminal offenders are sometimes required, by the institutions of criminal justice, to undergo medical interventions intended to promote rehabilitation. Ethical debate regarding this practice has largely proceeded on the assumption that medical interventions may only permissibly be administered to criminal offenders with their consent. In this article I challenge this assumption by suggesting that committing a crime might render one morally liable to certain forms of medical intervention. I then consider whether it is possible to respond persuasively to this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37.  2
    M. Lappe (1978). Dying While Living: A Critique of Allowing-to-Die Legislation. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (4):195-199.
    Several US states are enacting 'right-to-die' laws, in the wake of the Karen Quinlan case. But the way such a law is drafted may cast doubt on a patient's existing common law right to control all aspects of his own treatment; it may give legal sanction to a lower standard of medical care that society at present expects from doctors; and it may lead to conflict between the patient's directive and his doctor's clinical judgement which cannot readily (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Michael Cholbi (2015). No Last Resort: Pitting the Right to Die Against the Right to Medical Self-Determination. Journal of Ethics 19 (2):143-157.
    Many participants in debates about the morality of assisted dying maintain that individuals may only turn to assisted dying as a ‘last resort’, i.e., that a patient ought to be eligible for assisted dying only after she has exhausted certain treatment or care options. Here I argue that this last resort condition is unjustified, that it is in fact wrong to require patients to exhaust a prescribed slate of treatment or care options before being eligible for assisted dying. The last (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  62
    Carol J. Gill (2004). Depression in the Context of Disability and the “Right to Die”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (3):171-198.
    Arguments in favor of legalized assisted suicide often center on issues of personal privacy and freedom of choice over one's body. Many disability advocates assert, however, that autonomy arguments neglect the complex sociopolitical determinants of despair for people with disabilities. Specifically, they argue that social approval of suicide for individuals with irreversible conditions is discriminatory and that relaxing restrictions on assisted suicide would jeopardize, not advance, the freedom of persons with disabilities to direct the lives they choose. This paper examines (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  4
    F. M. Kamm (2012). The Moral Target: Aiming at Right Conduct in War and Other Conflicts. OUP Usa.
    The Moral Target: Aiming at Right Conduct in War and Other Conflicts comprises essays that discuss aspects of war and other conflicts in the light of nonconsequentialist ethical theory. Topics include the relation between conditions that justify starting war and those that justify stopping it, the treatment of combatants and noncombatants in war, collaboration, justice after war and other conflicts, terrorism, resistance to communal injustice, and nuclear deterrence.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  3
    Mark Tunick (1998). Practices and Principles: Approaches to Ethical and Legal Judgment. Princeton University Press.
    Are there universally valid moral principles that dictate what's right regardless of what the consensus is within a particular society? Or are moral judgments culturally relative, ultimately dictated by conventions and practices which vary among societies? Practices and Principles takes up the debate between cultural relativists and universalists, and the related debate in political philosophy between communitarians and liberals, each of which has roots in an earlier debate between Kant and Hegel. Rejecting uncritical deference to social practice, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Marianne Jennings (2006). The Seven Signs of Ethical Collapse: How to Spot Moral Meltdowns in Companies-- Before It's Too Late. St. Martin's Press.
    Do you want to make sure you · Don’t invest your money in the next Enron? · Don’t go to work for the next WorldCom right before the crash? · Identify and solve problems in your organization before they send it crashing to the ground? Marianne Jennings has spent a lifetime studying business ethics---and ethical failures. In demand nationwide as a speaker and analyst on business ethics, she takes her decades of findings and shows us in The Seven (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  43. John Hardwig (2000). Is There a Duty to Die?: And Other Essays in Bio-Ethics. Routledge.
    Amid the controversies surrounding physician-assisted suicides, euthanasia, and long-term care for the elderly, a major component in the ethics of medicine is notably absent: the rights and welfare of the survivor's family, for whom serious illness and death can be emotionally and financially devastating. In this collection of eight provocative and timely essays, John Hardwig sets forth his views on the need to replace patient-centered bioethics with family-centered bioethics. Starting with a critique of the awkward language with which philosphers argue (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  9
    Lorys F. Oddi, Virginia R. Cassidy & Cheryl Fisher (1995). Nurses' Sensitivity To the Ethical Aspects of Clinical Practice. Nursing Ethics 2 (3):197-209.
    The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which nurses perceive the ethical dimensions of clinical practice situations involving patients, families and health care professionals. Using the composite theory of basic moral principles and the professional standard of care established by legal custom as a framework, situations involving ethical dilemmas were gleaned from the nursing literature. They were reviewed for content validity, clarity and representativeness in a two-stage process by expert panels. The situations were (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  2
    Payam Moula & Per Sandin (2015). Moral “Lock-In” in Responsible Innovation: The Ethical and Social Aspects of Killing Day-Old Chicks and Its Alternatives. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):939-960.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that will help in understanding and evaluating, along social and ethical lines, the issue of killing day-old male chicks and two alternative directions of responsible innovations to solve this issue. The following research questions are addressed: Why is the killing of day-old chicks morally problematic? Are the proposed alternatives morally sound? To what extent do the alternatives lead to responsible innovation? The conceptual framework demonstrates clearly that there is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  41
    Colin McGinn (1992). Moral Literacy, or, How to Do the Right Thing. Hackett Pub. Co..
    The book is short and yet it richly embodies the methods of ethical thinking about practical moral problems that are hard for students to learn unless they see ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  3
    Vasil Gluchman (2013). Pious Aspects in the Ethical and Moral Views of Matthias Bel. History of European Ideas 39 (6):776-790.
    Summary The author of the paper studies the ethical views of Matthias Bel expressed in his Preface to Johann Arndt's treatise and in Davidian-Solomonian Ethics, which contain a critique of false Christianity and ancient (especially Aristotle's) ethics. Bel refuses any philosophical ethics based on human nature, since man, in his very essence, is sinful and vicious. This leads to the general moral downfall of the young and mankind. He only recognises ethics whose source and the highest good is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  12
    Sally Bibb (2010). The Right Thing: An Everyday Guide to Ethics in Business. Wiley.
    The book features: Simple explanations of big ethical ideas. Case studies to bring ethics to life, and show how bad it can be when ethics go wrong.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  32
    J. P. Moreland (1995). Humanness, Personhood, and the Right to Die. Faith and Philosophy 12 (1):95-112.
    A widely adopted approach to end-of-life ethical questions fails to make explicit certain crucial metaphysical ideas entailed by it and when those ideas are clarified, then it can be shown to be inadequate. These metaphysical themes cluster around the notions of personal identity, personhood and humanness, and the metaphysics of substance. In order to clarify and critique the approach just mentioned, I focus on the writings of Robert N. Wennberg as a paradigm case by, first, stating his views of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  20
    Purushottama Bilimoria (1995). Legal Rulings on Suicide in India and Implications for the Right to Die. Asian Philosophy 5 (2):159 – 180.
    Abstract In this paper I am concerned to address the question of voluntary or self?willed death from two distinct positions?a particular community's socio?religious practice (viz. Jaina sallekhan?) and as the matter stands in law (penal code, constitution, judicial wisdom, etc.) in India?in the light of the recent move by a bench of its apex court striking down the penal code section proscribing suicide. I also wish to draw out some implications of these deliberations for the beneficence of medical practice and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000