Search results for 'Right to education' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gonzalo Jover (2001). What Does the Right to Education Mean? A Look at an International Debate From Legal, Ethical, and Pedagogical Points of View. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):213-223.score: 726.0
    Working from a concept of politics of education that encompasses legal,ethical and pedagogical levels of analysis, this paper presents theresults of a field work project on the meaning and current state of theright to education with a larger philosophical discourse. Talk ofeducation as a human right presupposes taking part in a horizon ofinterpretation. Projected is a view of person as a subject, i.e., assomeone not only placed in a specific context, but also as someone whois capable of (...)
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  2. Birutė Pranevičienė & Aurelija Pūraitė (2010). Right to Education in International Legal Documents. Jurisprudence 121 (3):133-156.score: 720.0
    The importance of the right to education reaches far beyond education itself. The right to education is recognized, promoted and protected at all levels— from local to global. The concept of each human right constitutes a dual perception—human rights are personified and there are particular duty-bearers, most often the states, which have certain obligations to preserve and protect those rights. This article summarizes governmental obligations, foreseen in international and regional legal human rights’ instruments, corresponding (...)
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  3. Birutė Pranevičienė & Agnė Margevičiūtė (2012). The Right to Religious Education in Lithuania. Jurisprudence 19 (2):443-458.score: 702.0
    The article analyzes preconditions of realization of the right to religious education in Lithuania during the period of compulsory education. The article consists of two parts. The essence of the freedom of thought, religion and conscience and their relation to religious education is discussed in the first part. The second part of the article analyses national legal framework related to compulsory education in the light of freedom of thought, religion and conscience. The states are required (...)
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  4. Denise de Vito (2007). The Gap Between the Real and the Ideal: The Right to Education Amid Fiscal Equity Legislation in a Democratic Culture. Ethics and Education 2 (2):173-180.score: 549.0
    Lack of understanding about the relationship between federal and state educational institutions brings confusion into discussions of democracy, equity and equality in schools. The 'right to education' continues to be espoused by American society as a birthright, yet it does not figure in federal documentation. This matter has repeatedly come to the attention of legislative courts, who have insisted that the question of education as a fundamental right be addressed. Numerous court cases have attempted to bring (...)
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  5. Elias Hemelsoet (2012). How to Make Sense of the Right to Education? Issues From the Case of Roma People. Ethics and Education 7 (2):163-174.score: 549.0
    In most cases, discussions on the right to education focus on the way access to education can be warranted for all and which aims should be pursued in rather abstract terms. This article approaches the topic starting from the case of Roma people. The particularity of their living circumstances raises the question what it is that we are aiming at when trying to realize a universal right to education for them. After confronting their social practices (...)
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  6. Alan L. Lockwood (1977). Values Education and the Right to Privacy. Journal of Moral Education 7 (1):9-26.score: 531.0
    Abstract Values education is occasionally attacked as violative of the privacy rights of students and others. Stipulating a definition of the right to privacy, the author develops some general reasons for protecting the right to privacy. General criteria for judging the extent to which values education curricula violate privacy are established and applied to two approaches to values education. One conclusion is that not all approaches to values education should be seen as violative of (...)
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  7. Lucas Swaine (2012). The False Right to Autonomy in Education. Educational Theory 62 (1):107-124.score: 525.0
    The ideal of personal autonomy enjoys considerable support in educational theory, but close analysis reveals serious problems with its core analytical and psychological components. The core conception of autonomy authorizes individuals to employ their imaginations in troubling and unhealthy ways that clash with sound ideals of moral character. Lucas Swaine argues in this essay that this gives grounds to deny that the core conception of autonomy should be promoted in democratic education. What is more, according to Swaine, young citizens (...)
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  8. Tristan McCowan (2012). Is There a Universal Right to Higher Education? British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (2):111 - 128.score: 525.0
    Opposition to university fees is often framed as a defence of higher education as a 'right' rather than a 'privilege'. However, the basis and nature of this right is unclear. This article presents a conceptual exploration of the question, drawing on an initial analysis of international law. An argument is put forward for a right to higher education seen as one of a number of possible forms of post-school education, restricted only by a requirement (...)
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  9. Pádraig Hogan (2010). Preface to an Ethics of Education as a Practice in its Own Right. Ethics and Education 5 (2):85-98.score: 495.0
    Education as a practice in its own right (or sui generis practice) invokes quite a different set of ethical considerations than does education understood as a subordinate activity ? i.e. prescribed and controlled in its essentials by the current powers-that-be in a society. But the idea of education as a vehicle for the ?values? of a particular group or party is so commonplace, from history's legacy as well as from ongoing waves of educational reforms, as to (...)
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  10. Ylva Bergström (2010). The Universal Right to Education: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity. Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (2):167-182.score: 495.0
  11. I. M. M. Gregory (1973). The Right to Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 7 (1):85–102.score: 459.0
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  12. Daniel Lechner (2001). The Dangerous Human Right to Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):279-281.score: 459.0
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  13. Graham Haydon (1977). The 'Right to Education' and Compulsory Schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory 9 (1):1–15.score: 453.0
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  14. Colin Wringe (1986). The Human Right to Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 18 (2):23–33.score: 453.0
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  15. Gerald J. Beyer (2010). Catholic Universities, Solidarity and the Right to Education in the American Context. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 7 (1):145-179.score: 450.0
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  16. Marja Heimonen (2006). Justifying the Right to Music Education. Philosophy of Music Education Review 14 (2):119-141.score: 444.0
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  17. Hermann J. Kaiser (2006). A Response to Marja Heimonen, "Justifying the Right to Music Education&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 14 (2):213-216.score: 444.0
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  18. Aaron Cooley (2005). Book Review of Political Agendas for Education: From the Religious Right to the Green Party. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 37 (3):299-305.score: 438.0
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  19. David Carr (1999). Professional Education and Professional Ethics Right to Die or Duty to Live? Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):33–46.score: 435.0
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  20. C. Kaplan (2010). Film Review: In Response to the Prevalence of Technology and Multimedia Sources of Information in Nursing Academia and Continuing Education for Nurses, Nursing Ethics is Opening the Traditional Book Review Section of the Journal to Occasional Review of Material From Other Media, Including Film. Films for the Humanities and Sciences, The Right to Femininity: Fighting Female Circumcision in Africa Today, Films Media Group, Cambridge Educational: Princeton, New Jersey, 2005, 46 Minutes: VHS 9781421313610, DVD 9781421324099, VHS or DVD $149.95, DVD + 3-Year Streaming $224.93, 3-Year Streaming $149.95. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 17 (1):146-147.score: 435.0
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  21. Pradeep Dhillon (2011). The Role of Education in Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (3):249-259.score: 342.0
    Education lies at the heart of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR): ‘Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms’. However, when education is mentioned in the philosophical literature on human rights, or even within the literature on educational policy, it is usually within the context of its being treated as a specific right—as education as a human (...) rather than human rights education. Taking rights and obligations to be intimately tied within a full human rights educational regime, I argue for the role of education in establishing and realizing freedom from poverty as a human right. The arguments for why this freedom should be considered a human right are compelling. I offer five educational moments in the human rights movement in general, and the arguments for freedom from poverty as a human right, more specifically, in my discussion of human rights education. (shrink)
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  22. Robin Barrow (2009). Was Peters Nearly Right About Education? Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):9-25.score: 306.0
    Richard Peters pioneered a form of philosophical analysis in relation to educational discourse that was criticised by some at the time and is today somewhat out of fashion. This paper argues that much of the objection to Peters' methodology is based on a misunderstanding of what it does and does not involve, that consequently philosophical analysis is often wrongly seen as one of a number of comparable alternative traditions or approaches to philosophy of education between which one needs to (...)
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  23. Sara Radoff (2011). Crossing the Borders of Plyler V. Doe: Students Without Documentation and Their Right to Rights. Educational Studies 47 (5):436-450.score: 301.0
    In this article, I show that the intersection between education policy and immigration law in the United States sustains a permanent underclass and reinforces the deliberate disenfranchisement of students without authorized immigration status. I critically analyze the Supreme Court case Plyler s. Doe, and I suggest the DREAM Act as a means for these students to secure a right to rights for economic, social, and political agency. At the heart of the argument is my assertion that domiciled residency (...)
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  24. Sarah M. Stitzlein (2012). The Right to Dissent and its Implications for Schooling. Educational Theory 62 (1):41-58.score: 300.0
    In this article Sarah Stitzlein highlights an educational right that has been largely unacknowledged in the past but has recently gained significance given renewed citizen participation in displays of public outcry on our streets and in our town halls. Dissent is typically conceived of as a negative right—a liberty that guarantees that the government will not interfere with one's public self-expression. Stitzlein argues that, insofar as the legitimacy of the state depends on obtaining the consent of the governed, (...)
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  25. Gopal Sreenivasan (2012). A Human Right to Health? Some Inconclusive Scepticism. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):239-265.score: 297.0
    This paper offers four arguments against a moral human right to health, two denying that the right exists and two denying that it would be very useful (even if it did exist). One of my sceptical arguments is familiar, while the other is not.The unfamiliar argument is an argument from the nature of health. Given a realistic view of health production, a dilemma arises for the human right to health. Either a state's moral duty to preserve the (...)
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  26. Jacques Derrida (2004). Eyes of the University: Right to Philosophy. Stanford University Press.score: 297.0
    Completing the translation of Derrida’s monumental work Right to Philosophy (the first part of which has already appeared under the title of Who’s Afraid of Philosophy?), Eyes of the University brings together many of the philosopher’s most important texts on the university and, more broadly, on the languages and institutions of philosophy. In addition to considerations of the implications for literature and philosophy of French becoming a state language, of Descartes’ writing of the Discourse on Method in French, and (...)
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  27. Martin Gunderson (2011). Does the Human Right to Health Lack Content? Social Philosophy Today 27:49-62.score: 297.0
    The human right to health is crucial in the fight against global poverty. Health and an adequate standard of living are intimately connected. Poor health can make it difficult to overcome poverty, and poverty can make it difficult to attain good health. For the human right to health to be effective, however, it must have sufficient content to do the important normative work of rights. In the first part of this paper I give plausible arguments against the very (...)
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  28. Termika N. Smith (2012). To Conceal and Carry or Not to Conceal and Carry on Higher Education Campuses, That is the Question. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (3):237-242.score: 285.0
    This article addresses conceal and carry laws on higher education campuses as ethical and social dilemmas. The Second Amendment reads, “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed” (U. S. Const. amend. II 1791 ). Proponents for conceal and carry laws on college and university campuses often interpret the Second Amendment as an overarching right to have weapons, regardless (...)
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  29. Pádraig Hogan (2011). The Ethical Orientations of Education as a Practice in its Own Right. Ethics and Education 6 (1):27 - 40.score: 270.0
    This article is the second of a two-part investigation, the first part of which was published in Ethics and Education, vol. 5, issue 2, 2010, under the title ?Preface to an ethics of education as a practice in its own right?. Although it builds on the arguments of that ?preface?, this second part of the investigation can be read as a stand-alone essay. It begins with a brief review of a new subordination of educational practice achieved by (...)
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  30. Joel H. Spring (2006). Wheels in the Head: Educational Philosophies of Authority, Freedom, and Culture From Socrates to Human Rights. L. Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.score: 270.0
    In this popular text, Joel Spring provocatively analyzes the ideas of traditional and non-traditional philosophers, from Plato to Paulo Freire, regarding the contribution of education to the creation of a democratic society. Each section focuses on an important theme: “Autocratic and Democratic Forms of Education;” “Dissenting Traditions in Education;” “The Politics of Culture;” “The Politics of Gender;” and “Education and Human Rights.” This edition features a special emphasis on human rights education. Spring advocates a legally (...)
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  31. Marek Piechowiak (2011). Negatywna wolność religijna i przekonania sekularystyczne w świetle sprawy Lautsi przeciwko Włochom [Negative Religious Freedom and Secular Thought in the Light of the Case of Lautsi v. Italy]. Przegląd Sejmowy 19 (5 (106)):37-68.score: 270.0
    The article provides an analysis of the European Court of Human Rights judgments in the case of Lautsi v. Italy (application no. 30814/06), also known as the Italian crucifix case. The applicant claimed that displaying crucifixes in the Italian State-school classrooms attended by her children was contrary to the principle of secularism, by which she wished to bring up her children, and therefore infringed her right to ensure their education and teaching in conformity with her religious and philosophical (...)
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  32. Ivan Snook (1979). Education and Rights. International Scholarly Book Services.score: 270.0
  33. Luis Sime (1994). Challenges to Popular and Human Rights Education: The Formation of Producer, Citizen and Person. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):305-314.score: 269.7
    Abstract Popular education stands in the background of the majority of efforts in human rights education in Latin America. Both kinds of education have contributed to the education of people as producers, citizens and people. As producers, people are located in the common world of labour and the corresponding culture, as citizens in a sphere of rights and obligations, as people in their life?histories. All these dimensions provide challenges of a different kind to education; they (...)
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  34. John‐Stewart Gordon (2013). Is Inclusive Education a Human Right? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):754-767.score: 267.0
    In this article, I question the general idea that inclusive education — i.e., to teach all students in one class — is a moral human right. The following discussion shows that the widespread view in disability studies that there is a moral human right to inclusive education can be reasonably called into question by virtue of the proposed counter arguments, but without denying that inclusive education is of utmost importance. Practically speaking, the legal human (...) to inclusive education is of great practical value for impaired students, and for their basic right to be free from discrimination in education, since their concern thereby gains great legal and moral force. But, theoretically speaking, this particular human right lacks an attainable consensus concerning proper moral justification. (shrink)
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  35. Linus Vanlaere & Chris Gastmans (2007). Ethics in Nursing Education: Learning To Reflect On Care Practices. Nursing Ethics 14 (6):758-766.score: 261.0
    Providing good care requires nurses to reflect critically on their nursing practices. Ethics education must provide nurses with tools to accomplish such critical reflection. It must also create a pedagogical context in which a caring attitude can be taught and cultivated. To achieve this twofold goal, we argue that the principles of a right-action approach, within which nurses conform to a number of minimum principles, must be integrated into a virtue ethics approach that cultivates a caring attitude. Ethics (...)
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  36. Randall Curren (2009). Education as a Social Right in a Diverse Society. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):45-56.score: 247.0
    The aim of this article is to outline the basis for a comprehensive account of educational rights. It begins by acknowledging the difficulties posed by diversity, and defends a conception of universal human rights that limits parental educational discretion. Against the backdrop of the literature of public reason and fair equality of opportunity, it sketches arguments for the existence of rights to education of some specific kinds. Those rights, and associated educational purposes, are systematised on the basis of a (...)
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  37. Kenneth A. Strike (1990). Parents, the State and the Right to Educate. Educational Theory 40 (2):237-248.score: 246.3
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  38. Peter Singer, The Right to Be Rich or Poor the New York Review of Books , Vol. 23, No. 2 (March 6, 1975).score: 246.0
    When times are hard and governments are looking for ways to reduce expenditure, a book like Anarchy, State, and Utopia is about the last thing we need. That will be the reaction of some readers to this book. It is, of course, an unfair reaction, since a work of philosophy that consists of rigorous argument and needle-sharp analysis with absolutely none of the unsupported vague waffle that characterizes too many philosophy books must be welcomed whatever we think of its conclusions. (...)
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  39. Geoffrey Cupit (1990). Parents, the State and the Right to Educate. Philosophical Books 31 (3):177-179.score: 243.3
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  40. Ellen Allewijn (2010). Do Mothers Have the Right to Bring Up Their Own Children? How Facts Do Not Determine (Dutch) Government Policy. Ethics and Education 5 (2):147-157.score: 228.0
    The Dutch government has a double moral message for Dutch parents. On the one hand, they expect mothers to work more hours outside the home; on the other hand, they expect parents to perform better in their parental tasks. New research shows again that in spite of all stimulation measures, Dutch women with children prefer their part-time jobs, and parents prefer not to leave their children to the responsibility of day care all week. To what extent is the government allowed (...)
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  41. Cheryl Armon (1988). The Place of the Good in a Justice Reasoning Approach to Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 17 (3):220-229.score: 225.0
    Abstract Relying on developmental studies of reasoning about the good life, a model of moral education that integrates the good and the right is put forth. It is claimed that while Kohlberg's justice reasoning provides a justifiable aim for such curricula, how individuals attribute value will also significantly affect their moral actions. The notion of a ?critical period? for moral education during adolescence is also presented.
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  42. Jeffrey Glick (2010). Justification and the Right to Believe. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):532-544.score: 224.0
    Some philosophers have attempted to utilize the conceptual tools of ethics in order to understand epistemology. One instantiation of this understands justification in terms of having a certain kind of epistemic right, namely, a right to believe. In variations of this theme, some hold that justification involves having the authority to believe, or being entitled to believe. But by examining the putative analogies between different versions of rights and justification, I demonstrate that justification should not be understood as (...)
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  43. Ori J. Herstein (2012). Defending the Right To Do Wrong. Law and Philosophy 31 (3):343-365.score: 224.0
    Are there moral rights to do moral wrong? A right to do wrong is a right that others not interfere with the right-holder’s wrongdoing. It is a right against enforcement of duty, that is a right that others not interfere with one’s violation of one’s own obligations. The strongest reason for moral rights to do moral wrong is grounded in the value of personal autonomy. Having a measure of protected choice (that is a right) (...)
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  44. Kieran Oberman (2011). Immigration, Global Poverty and the Right to Stay. Political Studies 59 (2):253-268.score: 224.0
    This article questions the use of immigration as a tool to counter global poverty. It argues that poor people have a human right to stay in their home state, which entitles them to receive development assistance without the necessity of migrating abroad. The article thus rejects a popular view in the philosophical literature on immigration which holds that rich states are free to choose between assisting poor people in their home states and admitting them as immigrants when fulfilling duties (...)
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  45. Mark B. Brown & David H. Guston (2009). Science, Democracy, and the Right to Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):351-366.score: 224.0
    Debates over the politicization of science have led some to claim that scientists have or should have a “right to research.” This article examines the political meaning and implications of the right to research with respect to different historical conceptions of rights. The more common “liberal” view sees rights as protections against social and political interference. The “republican” view, in contrast, conceives rights as claims to civic membership. Building on the republican view of rights, this article conceives the (...)
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  46. Sune Lægaard (2010). What is the Right to Exclude Immigrants? Res Publica 16 (3):245-262.score: 224.0
    It is normally taken for granted that states have a right to control immigration into their territory. When immigration is raised as a normative issue two questions become salient, one about what the right to exclude is, and one about whether and how it might be justified. This paper considers the first question. The paper starts by noting that standard debates about immigration have not addressed what the right to exclude is. Standard debates about immigration furthermore tend (...)
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  47. Danny Frederick (2011). Confusion About the Right to Life. The Reasoner 5 (1):4-5.score: 224.0
    I defend the consistency of affirming the right to life while rejecting universal healthcare and liveable income programmes. I also defend the rationality of accepting inconsistency.
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  48. Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams (2011). Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.score: 224.0
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed (...)
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  49. Stephen Coleman (2006). E-Mail, Terrorism, and the Right to Privacy. Ethics and Information Technology 8 (1):17-27.score: 224.0
    This paper discusses privacy and the monitoring of e-mail in the context of the international nature of the modern world. Its three main aims are: (1) to highlight the problems involved in discussing an essentially philosophical question within a legal framework, and thus to show that providing purely legal answers to an ethical question is an inadequate approach to the problem of privacy on the Internet; (2) to discuss and define what privacy in the medium of the Internet actually is; (...)
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  50. Efrat Ram-Tiktin (2012). The Right to Health Care as a Right to Basic Human Functional Capabilities. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):337 - 351.score: 224.0
    A just social arrangement must guarantee a right to health care for all. This right should be understood as a positive right to basic human functional capabilities. The present article aims to delineate the right to health care as part of an account of distributive justice in health care in terms of the sufficiency of basic human functional capabilities. According to the proposed account, every individual currently living beneath the sufficiency threshold or in jeopardy of falling (...)
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