Search results for 'Right to health care' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams (2011). Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.score: 1224.0
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value (...)
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  2. Efrat Ram-Tiktin (2012). The Right to Health Care as a Right to Basic Human Functional Capabilities. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):337 - 351.score: 1224.0
    A just social arrangement must guarantee a right to health care for all. This right should be understood as a positive right to basic human functional capabilities. The present article aims to delineate the right to health care as part of an account of distributive justice in health care in terms of the sufficiency of basic human functional capabilities. According to the proposed account, every individual currently living beneath the sufficiency (...)
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  3. Paulius Čelkis & Eglė Venckienė (2011). Concept of the Right to Health Care. Jurisprudence 18 (1):269-286.score: 1224.0
    On the grounds of the fundamental value of the human rights, which is the human dignity, this article describes a basis of the right to health care in terms of quality, discloses its concept, reviews the spheres of health system in which this right is exercised: health care and public health. The right to health care is stressed as one of the fundamental rights, without which the person will not (...)
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  4. John C. Moskop (1983). Rawlsian Justice and a Human Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (4):329-338.score: 816.0
    This paper considers whether Rawls' theory of justice as fairness may be used to justify a human right to health care. Though Rawls himself does not discuss health care, other writers have applied Rawls' theory to the provision of health care. Ronald Green argues that contractors in the original position would establish a basic right to health care. Green's proposal, however, requires considerable relaxation of the constraints Rawls places on the (...)
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  5. Dani Filc (2007). The Liberal Grounding of the Right to Health Care: An Egalitarian Critique. Theoria 54 (112):51-72.score: 816.0
    The language of rights is increasingly used to regulate access to health care and allocation of resources in the health care field. The right to health has been grounded on different theories of justice. Scholars within the liberal tradition have grounded the right to health care on Rawls's two principles of justice. Thus, the right to health care has been justified as being one of the basic liberties, as (...)
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  6. J. T. Eberl, E. D. Kinney & M. J. Williams (2012). Foundation For A Natural Right To Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.score: 816.0
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate (...)
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  7. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2012). A Right to Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):268-285.score: 816.0
    What does it mean to say that there is a right to health care? Health care is part of a cooperative project that organizes finite resources. How are these resources to be distributed? This essay discusses three rival theories. The first two, a utilitarian theory and an interst theory, are both instrumental, in that they collapse rights to good states of affairs. A third theory, offered by Thomas Pogge, locates the question within an institutional legal (...)
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  8. Aeyal Gross (2013). Is There a Human Right to Private Health Care? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):138-146.score: 795.0
    In recent years we have noticed an increase in the turn to rights analysis in litigation relating to access to health care. Examining litigation, we can notice a contradiction between on the one hand the ability of the right to health to reinforce privatization and commodification of health care, by rearticulating claims to private health care in terms of human rights, and on the other hand, its ability to reinforce and reinstate public (...)
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  9. Paul T. Menzel (2011). The Cultural Moral Right to a Basic Minimum of Accessible Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (1):79-119.score: 792.0
    In the United States, amid the fractious politics of attempting to achieve something close to universal access to basic health care, two impressions are likely to feed skepticism about the status of a right to universal access: the moral principles that underlie any right to universal access may seem incredibly "ideal," not well rooted in the society's actual fabric, and the necessary practical and political attempts to limit the scope of universally accessible care to make (...)
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  10. Timothy F. Murphy (1994). Health Care Workers with Hiv and a Patient's Right to Know. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (6):553-569.score: 792.0
    Accidental human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of patients in health care settings raises the question about whether patients have a right to expect disclosure of HIV/AIDS diagnoses by their health workers. Although such a right – and the correlative duty to disclose – might appear justified by reason of standards of informed consent, I argue that such standards should only apply to questions of risks of and barriers to HIV infection involved in a particular medical (...)
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  11. Indrė Špokienė (2010). The Concept of Solidarity and its Role in Health Care Regulation (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 121 (3):329-348.score: 771.0
    The principle of solidarity is one of the fundamental legal principles applied in the field of health care regulation. This article analyses EU and Lithuanian legal acts, judicial practice, the doctrine of law and foreign scientific resources in order to reveal the content of solidarity principle and to discuss its role in the legal regulation of health care both at EU and national levels. The article is divided into three parts. The first part of the paper (...)
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  12. Yvonne Donders (2011). The Right to Enjoy the Benefits of Scientific Progress: In Search of State Obligations in Relation to Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):371-381.score: 744.0
    After having received little attention over the past decades, one of the least known human rights—the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications—has had its dust blown off. Although included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)—be it at the very end of both instruments -this right hardly received any attention from States, UN bodies and programmes and academics. The role of (...)
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  13. Albert Weale (2012). The Right to Health Versus Good Medical Care? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (4):473-493.score: 671.0
    There are two discourses that are used in connection with the provision of good healthcare: a rights discourse and a beneficial design discourse. Although the logical force of these two discourses overlaps, they have distinct and incompatible implications for practical reasoning about health policy. The language of rights can be interpreted as the ground of a well-designed healthcare system stressing the values of equality and inclusion, but it has less application when dealing with questions of cost-effectiveness. This difference reflects (...)
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  14. Bernard Baumrin (2002). Why There is No Right to Health Care. In Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.), Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. Oup Usa. 78--83.score: 666.0
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  15. Stuart F. Spicker (2005). The Right to Health Care and Other Misconceptions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):115-117.score: 666.0
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  16. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2004). The Goal : Health for All-the Commitment : All for Health. Mens Sana Monographs 2 (1):97.score: 639.0
    Primary Health Care was the means by which Health for All by the Year 2000 AD was to be achieved. And Health for All was possible only if All were mobilised for Health. This meant not just governments and medical establishments, but people themselves. Primary health care is essentially health care made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community by means acceptable to them, through their full participation and at (...)
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  17. Charles L. Sprung, Leonid A. Eidelman & Avraham Steinberg (1997). Is the Patient's Right to Die Evolving Into a Duty to Die?: Medical Decision Making and Ethical Evaluations in Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (1):69-75.score: 618.0
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  18. Martin Biujsen & André den Exter (2010). Pt. 2. Equitable Access to Health Care. Equality and the Right to Health Care. In André den Exter (ed.), Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu.score: 616.0
     
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  19. Walter Devillé (2010). The Right to Health Care for Vulnerable Population Groups in the Netherlands and Europe. In André den Exter (ed.), Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu.score: 616.0
     
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  20. Gary E. Jones (1983). The Right to Health Care and the State. Philosophical Quarterly 33 (132):279-287.score: 612.0
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  21. James F. Childress (1979). The Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):132-147.score: 612.0
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  22. Robert M. Veatch (1979). Just Social Institutions and the Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):170-173.score: 612.0
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  23. Mark Siegler (1979). A Right to Health Care: Ambiguity, Professional Responsibility, and Patient Liberty. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):148-157.score: 612.0
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  24. Ruth R. Faden (1979). The Right to Health and the Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):118-131.score: 612.0
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  25. T. L. Beauchamp & R. R. Faden (1979). The Right to Health and the Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):118-131.score: 612.0
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  26. Sidney Dean Watson (1994). Minority Access and Health Reform: A Civil Right to Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (2):127-137.score: 612.0
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  27. Allen Buchanan (1985). Competition, Charity and the Right to Health Care. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 7:129-143.score: 612.0
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  28. David DeGrazia (1991). Grounding a Right to Health Care in Self-Respect and Self-Esteem. Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (4):301-318.score: 612.0
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  29. John Ancona Robertson (2006). Controversial Medical Treatment and the Right to Health Care. Hastings Center Report 36 (6):15-20.score: 612.0
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  30. Epstein Richard Allen (1999). [Book Review] Mortal Peril, Our Inalienable Right to Health Care? [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 29 (1).score: 612.0
     
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  31. Pat Milmoe McCarrick (1992). A Right to Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 2 (4):389-405.score: 612.0
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  32. Edward V. Sparer (1976). The Legal Right to Health Care: Public Policy and Equal Access. Hastings Center Report 6 (5):39-47.score: 612.0
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  33. Robert M. Veatch (1981). Ethical Aspects of the Right to Health Care. In Marc D. Hiller (ed.), Medical Ethics and the Law: Implications for Public Policy. Ballinger Pub. Co..score: 612.0
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  34. Bengt-Ola S. Bengtsson (2011). Promote the General Welfare to Ourselves and Our Posterity: The Founding Documents of the United States and the Nation's Health Care Debate. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):249-255.score: 602.0
    A recent on-line discussion asked whether healthcare for Americans is a constitutional right or a privilege. One can debate whether one can extract a legal right to healthcare from the Declaration of Independence depending on whether one sees it is a philosophical or as a legal document. The Constitution of the United States of America lists “promote the general welfare” and protect “ourselves and our posterity” as some of its aims. Perhaps this would demand the inclusion of certain (...)
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  35. Allen E. Buchanan (1984). The Right to a Decent Minimum of Health Care. Philosophy and Public Affairs 13 (1):55-78.score: 594.0
  36. E. C. Brugger (2012). Do Health Care Providers Have a Right to Refuse to Treat Some Patients? Christian Bioethics 18 (1):15-29.score: 594.0
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  37. Laurence J. O'Connell, James Parker, Mary C. Rawlinson, Massimo Reichlin, David Resnik, John Sadler, Yosaf Hulgus, George Agich, Marian Gray Secundy & Mark J. Sedler (1994). AIDS 519 Murphy, Timothy F. Health-Care Workers with AIDS and a Patient's Right to Know 553 Nelson, James Lindemann. Publicity and Pricelessness: Grassroots Decisionmaking and Justice in Rationing 333. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19:641-645.score: 594.0
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  38. D. Dickenson (1994). The Right to Know and the Right to Privacy: Confidentiality, HIV and Health Care Professionals. Nursing Ethics 1 (2):111-115.score: 594.0
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  39. Juan A. Figueroa (2012). Fighting for Our Health: The Epic Battle to Make Health Care a Right in the United States Fighting for Our Health: The Epic Battle to Make Health Care a Right in the United States Richard Kirsch , Albany, N.Y.: The Rockefeller Institute Press. 2012. 416 Pp. $19.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Inquiry 49 (4):362-363.score: 594.0
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  40. Juan A. Figueroa (2012). Fighting for Our Health: The Epic Battle to Make Health Care a Right in the United States. Inquiry 49 (4):362-363.score: 594.0
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  41. Søren Holm (2011). Can “Giving Preference to My Patients” Be Explained as a Role Related Duty in Public Health Care Systems? Health Care Analysis 19 (1):89-97.score: 594.0
    Most of us have two strong intuitions (or sets of intuitions) in relation to fairness in health care systems that are funded by public money, whether through taxation or compulsory insurance. The first intuition is that such a system has to treat patients (and other users) fairly, equitably, impartially, justly and without discrimination. The second intuition is that doctors, nurses and other health care professionals are allowed to, and may even in some cases be obligated to (...)
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  42. Ade Firmansyah Sugiharto (2010). Right and Duty to Emergency Care Under the Provision of Indonesian Health Act 36/2009. Asian Bioethics Review 2 (3):195-201.score: 594.0
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  43. Shelley Morrisette, William D. Oberman, Allison D. Watts & Joseph B. Beck (2013). Health Care: A Brave New World. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis:1-18.score: 568.0
    The current U.S. health care system, with both rising costs and demands, is unsustainable. The combination of a sense of individual entitlement to health care and limited acceptance of individual responsibility with respect to personal health has contributed to a system which overspends and underperforms. This sense of entitlement has its roots in a perceived right to health care. Beginning with the so-called moral right to health care (all life (...)
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  44. Massimo Reichlin (2011). The Role of Solidarity in Social Responsibility for Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):365-370.score: 566.0
    The Article focuses on the concept of social solidarity, as it is used in the Report of the International Bioethics Committee On Social Responsibility and Health. It is argued that solidarity plays a major role in supporting the whole framework of social responsibility, as presented by the IBC. Moreover, solidarity is not limited to members of particular groups, but potentially extended to all human beings on the basis of their inherent dignity; this sense of human solidarity is a necessary (...)
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  45. Timothy Goodman (2005). Is There a Right to Health? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (6):643 – 662.score: 555.0
    This article challenges the widespread contention - promoted by the World Health Organization, the U.N. Human Rights Commission, and certain non-governmental organizations - that health care should be regarded as an individual human right. Like other "post-modern" rights, the asserted individual right to health care is a positive claim on the resources of others; it is unlimited by corresponding responsibilities; and it pertains exclusively to the individual. In fact, an individual human right (...)
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  46. Hans-Martin Sass (1983). Justice, Beneficence, or Common Sense?: The President's Commission's Report on Access to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (4):381-388.score: 555.0
    The President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research published in March of 1983 its Report, Securing Access to Health Care: The Ethical Implications of Differences in the Availability of Health Services . Concluding that there are "ethical obligations" on behalf of society which are balanced by individual obligations, the Report provides an ethical framework for ensuring "ultimate responsibility" of the Federal government to arrange for equitable access to health (...)
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  47. D. P. Sulmasy (1996). Do the Bishops Have It Right On Health Care Reform? Christian Bioethics 2 (3):309-325.score: 555.0
    The National Conference of Catholic Bishops has argued for significant government involvement in health care in order to assure respect for what they regard as the right to health care. Critics charge that the bishops are wrong because health care is not a right. In this article, it is argued that these critics are correct in their claim that health care is not a right. However, it is also argued (...)
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  48. Dylan Ronald Tomlinson & Winston Trew (eds.) (2002). Equalising Opportunities, Minimising Oppression: A Critical Review of Anti-Discriminatory Policies in Health and Social Welfare. Routledge.score: 552.0
    This book clarifies the distinctions between three key concepts - Anti-Racist Practice (ARP), Anti-Discriminatory Practice(ADP) and Anti-Oppressive Practice (AOP). Critically and constructively analysing these three approaches to practice it reappraises their potential in the light of emerging equality issues in the health service. With contributions from leading teachers and practitioners in the field, Equalising Opportunities provides students and practitioners in health and social care with a clear overview of an area where there is much confusion and imperfect (...)
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  49. C. Sinding, L. Schwartz, M. Hunt, L. Redwood-Campbell, L. Elit & J. Ranford (2010). 'Playing God Because You Have To': Health Professionals' Narratives of Rationing Care in Humanitarian and Development Work. Public Health Ethics 3 (2):147-156.score: 546.0
    This article explores the accounts of Canadian-trained health professionals working in humanitarian and development organizations who considered not treating a patient or group of patients because of resource limitations. In the narratives, not treating the patient(s) was sometimes understood as the right thing to do, and sometimes as wrong. In analyzing participants’ narratives we draw attention to how medications and equipment are represented. In one type of narrative, medications and equipment are represented primarily as scarce resources; in another, (...)
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  50. J. Webb & C. Warwick (1999). Getting It Right: The Teaching of Philosophical Health Care Ethics. Nursing Ethics 6 (2):150-156.score: 540.0
    This article seeks to show one way in which moral philosophy, considered by the authors to be essential to the nursing and midwifery curricula, can be presented to achieve an optimal learning experience for nurses and midwives. It demonstrates that what might be considered a standard approach, that is, one that begins with ethical principles concerned with rights and duties and then often follows a linear pattern of teaching, may be in danger of promoting a focus on standardized outcomes. Such (...)
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