Search results for 'Right to health care' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams (2011). Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value (...)
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  2.  59
    Efrat Ram-Tiktin (2012). The Right to Health Care as a Right to Basic Human Functional Capabilities. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):337 - 351.
    A just social arrangement must guarantee a right to health care for all. This right should be understood as a positive right to basic human functional capabilities. The present article aims to delineate the right to health care as part of an account of distributive justice in health care in terms of the sufficiency of basic human functional capabilities. According to the proposed account, every individual currently living beneath the sufficiency (...)
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  3.  9
    Paulius Čelkis & Eglė Venckienė (2011). Concept of the Right to Health Care. Jurisprudence 18 (1):269-286.
    On the grounds of the fundamental value of the human rights, which is the human dignity, this article describes a basis of the right to health care in terms of quality, discloses its concept, reviews the spheres of health system in which this right is exercised: health care and public health. The right to health care is stressed as one of the fundamental rights, without which the person will not (...)
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  4.  1
    James W. Nickel (2016). Can a Right to Health Care Be Justified by Linkage Arguments? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):293-306.
    Linkage arguments, which defend a controversial right by showing that it is indispensable or highly useful to an uncontroversial right, are sometimes used to defend the right to health care. This article evaluates such arguments when used to defend RHC. Three common errors in using linkage arguments are neglecting levels of implementation, expanding the scope of the supported right beyond its uncontroversial domain, and giving too much credit to the supporting right for outcomes (...)
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  5.  38
    Peter George Negus West-Oram (2014). Global Health Care Injustice: An Analysis of the Demands of the Basic Right to Health Care. Dissertation, The University of Birmingham
    Henry Shue’s model of basic rights and their correlative duties provides an excellent framework for analysing the requirements of global distributive justice, and for theorising about the minimum acceptable standards of human entitlement and wellbeing. Shue bases his model on the claim that certain ‘basic’ rights are of universal instrumental value, and are necessary for the enjoyment of any other rights, and of any ‘decent life’. Shue’s model provides a comprehensive argument about the importance of certain fundamental goods for all (...)
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  6.  8
    Norman Daniels (2015). A Progressively Realizable Right to Health and Global Governance. Health Care Analysis 23 (4):330-340.
    A moral right to health or health care is a special instance of a right to fair equality of opportunity. Nation-states generally have the capabilities to specify the entitlements of such a right and to raise the resources needed to satisfy those entitlements. Can these functions be replicated globally, as a global right to health or health care requires? The suggestion that “better global governance” is needed if such a global (...)
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  7.  3
    David A. Reidy (2016). A Right to Health Care? Participatory Politics, Progressive Policy, and the Price of Loose Language. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):323-342.
    This article begins by clarifying and noting various limitations on the universal reach of the human right to health care under positive international law. It then argues that irrespective of the human right to health care established by positive international law, any system of positive international law capable of generating legal duties with prima facie moral force necessarily presupposes a universal moral human right to health care. But the language used in (...)
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  8.  15
    Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2012). A Right to Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (2):268-285.
    What does it mean to say that there is a right to health care? Health care is part of a cooperative project that organizes finite resources. How are these resources to be distributed? This essay discusses three rival theories. The first two, a utilitarian theory and an interst theory, are both instrumental, in that they collapse rights to good states of affairs. A third theory, offered by Thomas Pogge, locates the question within an institutional legal (...)
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  9. Paul T. Menzel (2011). The Cultural Moral Right to a Basic Minimum of Accessible Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (1):79-119.
    In the United States, amid the fractious politics of attempting to achieve something close to universal access to basic health care, two impressions are likely to feed skepticism about the status of a right to universal access: the moral principles that underlie any right to universal access may seem incredibly "ideal," not well rooted in the society's actual fabric, and the necessary practical and political attempts to limit the scope of universally accessible care to make (...)
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  10.  91
    John C. Moskop (1983). Rawlsian Justice and a Human Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (4):329-338.
    This paper considers whether Rawls' theory of justice as fairness may be used to justify a human right to health care. Though Rawls himself does not discuss health care, other writers have applied Rawls' theory to the provision of health care. Ronald Green argues that contractors in the original position would establish a basic right to health care. Green's proposal, however, requires considerable relaxation of the constraints Rawls places on the (...)
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  11.  1
    Jennifer Prah Ruger (2016). The Health Capability Paradigm and the Right to Health Care in the United States. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):275-292.
    Against a backdrop of non-ideal political and legal conditions, this article examines the health capability paradigm and how its principles can help determine what aspects of health care might legitimately constitute positive health care rights—and if indeed human rights are even the best approach to equitable health care provision. This article addresses the long American preoccupation with negative rights rather than positive rights in health care. Positive health care rights (...)
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  12.  48
    J. T. Eberl, E. D. Kinney & M. J. Williams (2011). Foundation For A Natural Right To Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the (...)
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  13.  74
    Dani Filc (2007). The Liberal Grounding of the Right to Health Care: An Egalitarian Critique. Theoria 54 (112):51-72.
    The language of rights is increasingly used to regulate access to health care and allocation of resources in the health care field. The right to health has been grounded on different theories of justice. Scholars within the liberal tradition have grounded the right to health care on Rawls's two principles of justice. Thus, the right to health care has been justified as being one of the basic liberties, as (...)
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  14.  2
    Sarah Conly (2016). The Right to Preventive Health Care. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):307-321.
    The right to health care is a right to care that is not too costly to the provider, considering the benefits it conveys, and is effective in bringing about the level of health needed for a good human life, not necessarily the best health possible. These considerations suggest that, where possible, society has an obligation to provide preventive health care, which is both low cost and effective, and that health (...) regulations should promote citizens’ engagement in reasonable preventive health care practices. (shrink)
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  15.  9
    Aeyal Gross (2013). Is There a Human Right to Private Health Care? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (1):138-146.
    In recent years we have noticed an increase in the turn to rights analysis in litigation relating to access to health care. Examining litigation, we can notice a contradiction between on the one hand the ability of the right to health to reinforce privatization and commodification of health care, by rearticulating claims to private health care in terms of human rights, and on the other hand, its ability to reinforce and reinstate public (...)
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  16.  11
    Timothy F. Murphy (1994). Health Care Workers with Hiv and a Patient's Right to Know. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (6):553-569.
    Accidental human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of patients in health care settings raises the question about whether patients have a right to expect disclosure of HIV/AIDS diagnoses by their health workers. Although such a right – and the correlative duty to disclose – might appear justified by reason of standards of informed consent, I argue that such standards should only apply to questions of risks of and barriers to HIV infection involved in a particular medical (...)
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  17. Ken Knisely, Helen John & Patrick Sullivan (2001). Right to Health Care: Dvd. Milk Bottle Productions.
    To what extent can individuals make a claim on their community to provide for upkeep and healing of their bodies? Can the philosophy of natural rights that animates the American political tradition be applied usefully to the health care debate? With Michael Boylan, Helen John, and Patrick Sullivan.
     
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  18. Ken Knisely, Michael Boylan, Helen John & Patrick Sullivan (forthcoming). Right to Health Care: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed. DVD.
    To what extent can individuals make a claim on their community to provide for upkeep and healing of their bodies? Can the philosophy of natural rights that animates the American political tradition be applied usefully to the health care debate? With Michael Boylan, Helen John, and Patrick Sullivan.
     
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  19.  5
    Stuart F. Spicker (2005). The Right to Health Care and Other Misconceptions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):115-117.
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  20.  15
    Bernard Baumrin (2002). Why There is No Right to Health Care. In Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.), Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. OUP Usa 78--83.
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  21.  15
    Albert Weale (2012). The Right to Health Versus Good Medical Care? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (4):473-493.
    There are two discourses that are used in connection with the provision of good healthcare: a rights discourse and a beneficial design discourse. Although the logical force of these two discourses overlaps, they have distinct and incompatible implications for practical reasoning about health policy. The language of rights can be interpreted as the ground of a well-designed healthcare system stressing the values of equality and inclusion, but it has less application when dealing with questions of cost-effectiveness. This difference reflects (...)
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  22. T. L. Beauchamp & R. R. Faden (1979). The Right to Health and the Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):118-131.
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  23. Ruth R. Faden (1979). The Right to Health and the Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):118-131.
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  24.  60
    Robert M. Veatch (1979). Just Social Institutions and the Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):170-173.
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  25.  22
    John Ancona Robertson (2006). Controversial Medical Treatment and the Right to Health Care. Hastings Center Report 36 (6):15-20.
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  26.  51
    James F. Childress (1979). The Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):132-147.
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  27.  50
    Mark Siegler (1979). A Right to Health Care: Ambiguity, Professional Responsibility, and Patient Liberty. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):148-157.
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  28.  20
    Gary E. Jones (1983). The Right to Health Care and the State. Philosophical Quarterly 33 (132):279-287.
  29.  7
    David DeGrazia (1991). Grounding a Right to Health Care in Self-Respect and Self-Esteem. Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (4):301-318.
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  30.  3
    Sidney Dean Watson (1994). Minority Access and Health Reform: A Civil Right to Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 22 (2):127-137.
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  31.  3
    Pat Milmoe McCarrick (1992). A Right to Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 2 (4):389-405.
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  32.  7
    Allen Buchanan (1985). Competition, Charity and the Right to Health Care. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 7:129-143.
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  33.  3
    Edward V. Sparer (1976). The Legal Right to Health Care: Public Policy and Equal Access. Hastings Center Report 6 (5):39-47.
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  34. Epstein Richard Allen (1999). [Book Review] Mortal Peril, Our Inalienable Right to Health Care? [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 29 (1).
     
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  35. Martin Biujsen & André den Exter (2010). Pt. 2. Equitable Access to Health Care. Equality and the Right to Health Care. In André den Exter (ed.), Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu
     
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  36. Walter Devillé (2010). The Right to Health Care for Vulnerable Population Groups in the Netherlands and Europe. In André den Exter (ed.), Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu
     
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  37. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2012). A Right to Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):268-285.
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  38. Robert M. Veatch (1981). Ethical Aspects of the Right to Health Care. In Marc D. Hiller (ed.), Medical Ethics and the Law: Implications for Public Policy. Ballinger Pub. Co.
     
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  39. Sidney Dean Watson (1994). Minority Access and Health Reform: A Civil Right to Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (2):127-137.
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  40.  5
    Charles L. Sprung, Leonid A. Eidelman & Avraham Steinberg (1997). Is the Patient's Right to Die Evolving Into a Duty to Die?: Medical Decision Making and Ethical Evaluations in Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (1):69-75.
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  41. Allen E. Buchanan (1984). The Right to a Decent Minimum of Health Care. Philosophy and Public Affairs 13 (1):55-78.
  42.  97
    Laurence J. O'Connell, James Parker, Mary C. Rawlinson, Massimo Reichlin, David Resnik, John Sadler, Yosaf Hulgus, George Agich, Marian Gray Secundy & Mark J. Sedler (1994). AIDS 519 Murphy, Timothy F. Health-Care Workers with AIDS and a Patient's Right to Know 553 Nelson, James Lindemann. Publicity and Pricelessness: Grassroots Decisionmaking and Justice in Rationing 333. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19:641-645.
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  43.  2
    Eric A. Friedman & Lawrence O. Gostin (2015). Imagining Global Health with Justice: In Defense of the Right to Health. Health Care Analysis 23 (4):308-329.
    The singular message in Global Health Law is that we must strive to achieve global health with justice—improved population health, with a fairer distribution of benefits of good health. Global health entails ensuring the conditions of good health—public health, universal health coverage, and the social determinants of health—while justice requires closing today’s vast domestic and global health inequities. These conditions for good health should be incorporated into public policy, supplemented (...)
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  44.  5
    Ade Firmansyah Sugiharto (2010). Right and Duty to Emergency Care Under the Provision of Indonesian Health Act 36/2009. Asian Bioethics Review 2 (3):195-201.
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  45.  5
    Juan A. Figueroa (2012). Fighting for Our Health: The Epic Battle to Make Health Care a Right in the United States Fighting for Our Health: The Epic Battle to Make Health Care a Right in the United States Richard Kirsch , Albany, N.Y.: The Rockefeller Institute Press. 2012. 416 Pp. $19.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Inquiry 49 (4):362-363.
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  46.  10
    E. C. Brugger (2012). Do Health Care Providers Have a Right to Refuse to Treat Some Patients? Christian Bioethics 18 (1):15-29.
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  47.  3
    Juan A. Figueroa (2012). Fighting for Our Health: The Epic Battle to Make Health Care a Right in the United States. Inquiry 49 (4):362-363.
  48.  2
    D. Dickenson (1994). The Right to Know and the Right to Privacy: Confidentiality, HIV and Health Care Professionals. Nursing Ethics 1 (2):111-115.
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  49. Aeyal Gross (2013). Is There a Human Right to Private Health Care? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):138-146.
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  50.  31
    Yvonne Donders (2011). The Right to Enjoy the Benefits of Scientific Progress: In Search of State Obligations in Relation to Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):371-381.
    After having received little attention over the past decades, one of the least known human rights—the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications—has had its dust blown off. Although included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)—be it at the very end of both instruments -this right hardly received any attention from States, UN bodies and programmes and academics. The role of (...)
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