Search results for 'Rita Nakashima Brock' (try it on Scholar)

984 found
Sort by:
  1. Rita Nakashima Brock (1993). God's Power. Process Studies 22 (1):58-60.score: 870.0
  2. Joanne Lynn, Joan Teno, Rebecca Dresser, Dan Brock, H. Lindemann Nelson, J. Lindemann Nelson, Rita Kielstein, Yoshinosuke Fukuchi, Dan Lu & Haruka Itakura (1999). Dementia and Advance-Care Planning: Perspectives From Three Countries on Ethics and Epidemiology. Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (4):271.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Rita Brock (1982). Feminism and Process Thought. Process Studies 12 (1):46-50.score: 240.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Stephen L. Brock, Stephen L. Brock.score: 180.0
    Size is not always a gauge of significance. The issue that I propose to address here centers on a single clause from the Summa theologiae . But it goes nearly to the heart of St Thomas’s teaching on natural law. It concerns the way in which Thomas thinks the human mind comes to understand good and evil. The specific question raised by the clause is the role played in this process by what Thomas calls “natural inclination.” This question leads to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Gillian Brock (2009). Concerns About Global Justice : A Response to Critics. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):269 – 280.score: 60.0
    A review essay of Gillian Brock Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account (Oxford University Press, 2009).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Dan W. Brock (1993). Life and Death: Philosophical Essays in Biomedical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    How should modern medicine's dramatic new powers to sustain life be employed? How should limited resources be used to extend and improve the quality of life? In this collection, Dan Brock, a distinguished philosopher and bioethicist and co-author of Deciding for Others (Cambridge, 1989), explores the moral issues raised by new ideals of shared decision making between physicians and patients. The book develops an ethical framework for decisions about life-sustaining treatment and euthanasia, and examines how these life and death (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Soran Reader & Gillian Brock (2004). Needs, Moral Demands and Moral Theory. Utilitas 16 (3):251-266.score: 60.0
    In this article we argue that the concept of need is as vital for moral theory as it is for moral life. In II we analyse need and its normativity in public and private moral practice. In III we describe simple cases which exemplify the moral demandingness of needs, and argue that the significance of simple cases for moral theory is obscured by the emphasis in moral philosophy on unusual cases. In IV we argue that moral theories are inadequate if (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Gillian Brock (2009). Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    OUP writes: Gillian Brock develops a viable cosmopolitan model of global justice that takes seriously the equal moral worth of persons, yet leaves scope for defensible forms of nationalism and for other legitimate identifications and affiliations people have. Brock addresses two prominent kinds of skeptic about global justice: those who doubt its feasibility and those who believe that cosmopolitanism interferes illegitimately with the defensible scope of nationalism by undermining goods of national importance, such as authentic democracy or national (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. S. R. Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.) (2011). Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Global Health, Definitions and Descriptions: 1. What is global health? Solly Benatar and Ross Upshur; 2. The state of global health in a radically unequal world: patterns and prospects Ron Labonte and Ted Schrecker; 3. Addressing the societal determinants of health: the key global health ethics imperative of our times Anne-Emmanuelle Birn; 4. Gender and global health: inequality and differences Lesley Doyal and Sarah Payne; 5. Heath systems and health Martin McKee; Part (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Werner Brock (1935). An Introduction to Contemporary German Philosophy. Cambridge [Eng.]The University Press.score: 60.0
    Werner Brock. was concerned equally with nature and with human life and was striving to explore the reality of all that exists, philosophy met with a serious crisis. For a fundamental issue arose: must philosophy be merged in science or has it ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Dan W. Brock (1992). Voluntary Active Euthanasia. Hastings Center Report 22 (2):10-22.score: 30.0
    This article references the following linked citations. If you are trying to access articles from an off-campus location, you may be required to first logon via your library web site to access JSTOR. Please visit your library's website or contact a librarian to learn about options for remote access to JSTOR.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Stuart Brock (2007). Fictions, Feelings, and Emotions. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):211 - 242.score: 30.0
    Many philosophers suggest (1) that our emotional engagement with fiction involves participation in a game of make-believe, and (2) that what distinguishes an emotional game from a dispassionate game is the fact that the former activity alone involves sensations of physiological and visceral disturbances caused by our participation in the game. In this paper I argue that philosophers who accept (1) should reject (2). I then illustrate how this conclusion illuminates various puzzles in aesthetics and the philosophy of mind.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gillian Brock (2005). The Difference Principle, Equality of Opportunity, and Cosmopolitan Justice. Journal of Moral Philosophy 2 (3):333-351.score: 30.0
    What kinds of principles of justice should a cosmopolitan support? In recent years some have argued that a cosmopolitan should endorse a Global Difference Principle. It has also been suggested that a cosmopolitan should support a Principle of Global Equality of Opportunity. In this paper I examine how compelling these two suggestions are. I argue against a Global Difference Principle, but for an alternative Needs-Based Minimum Floor Principle (where these are not co-extensive, as I explain). Though I support a negative (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Dan W. Brock (2009). Cost-Effectiveness and Disability Discrimination. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):27-47.score: 30.0
    It is widely recognized that prioritizing health care resources by their relative cost-effectiveness can result in lower priority for the treatment of disabled persons than otherwise similar non-disabled persons. I distinguish six different ways in which this discrimination against the disabled can occur. I then spell out and evaluate the following moral objections to this discrimination, most of which capture an aspect of its unethical character: it implies that disabled persons' lives are of lesser value than those of non-disabled persons; (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Stuart Brock (2002). Fictionalism About Fictional Characters. Noûs 36 (1):1–21.score: 30.0
    Despite protestations to the contrary, philosophers have always been renowned for espousing theories that do violence to common-sense opinion. In the last twenty years or so there has been a growing number of philosophers keen to follow in this tradition. According to these philosophers, if a story of pure fic-tion tells us that an individual exists, then there really is such an individual. According to these realists about fictional characters, ‘Scarlett O’Hara,’ ‘Char-lie Brown,’ ‘Batman,’ ‘Superman,’ ‘Tweedledum’ and ‘Tweedledee’ are not (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Stuart Brock (2010). The Creationist Fiction: The Case Against Creationism About Fictional Characters. Philosophical Review 119 (3):337-364.score: 30.0
    This essay explains why creationism about fictional characters is an abject failure. Creationism about fictional characters is the view that fictional objects are created by the authors of the novels in which they first appear. This essay shows that, when the details of creationism are filled in, the hypothesis becomes far more puzzling than the linguistic data it is used to explain. No matter how the creationist identifies where, when and how fictional objects are created, the proposal conflicts with other (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Allen Buchanan, Dan Brock, Norman Daniels & Dan Wikler, Why Not the Best?score: 30.0
    "Be All You Can Be," the Army recruiting poster urges young men and women. Many parents share the sentiment. They want their children to be the best they can be. For many parents, their most important project in life is to pursue that goal, and they make sacrifices to see it happen. And why shouldn't parents aim to make their offspring the best they can be?
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Dan W. Brock (1995). The Non-Identity Problem and Genetic Harms – the Case of Wrongful Handicaps. Bioethics 9 (3):269–275.score: 30.0
  19. Gillian Brock (2008). Taxation and Global Justice: Closing the Gap Between Theory and Practice. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):161–184.score: 30.0
    I examine how reforming our international tax regime could be an important vehicle by which we can begin to realize global justice. For instance, eliminating tax havens, tax evasion, and transfer pricing schemes are all important to ensure accountability and to support democracies. I argue that the proposals concerning taxation reform are likely to be more effective in tackling global poverty than Thomas Pogge's global resources dividend because they target some of the central issues more effectively. I also discuss many (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Dan W. Brock (1999). A Critique of Three Objections to Physician‐Assisted Suicide. Ethics 109 (3):519-547.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Franklin G. Miller, Robert D. Truog & Dan W. Brock (2010). Moral Fictions and Medical Ethics. Bioethics 24 (9):453-460.score: 30.0
    Conventional medical ethics and the law draw a bright line distinguishing the permitted practice of withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from the forbidden practice of active euthanasia by means of a lethal injection. When clinicians justifiably withdraw life-sustaining treatment, they allow patients to die but do not cause, intend, or have moral responsibility for, the patient's death. In contrast, physicians unjustifiably kill patients whenever they intentionally administer a lethal dose of medication. We argue that the differential moral assessment of these two practices (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Dan W. Brock (2008). Conscientious Refusal by Physicians and Pharmacists: Who is Obligated to Do What, and Why? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):187-200.score: 30.0
    Some medical services have long generated deep moral controversy within the medical profession as well as in broader society and have led to conscientious refusals by some physicians to provide those services to their patients. More recently, pharmacists in a number of states have refused on grounds of conscience to fill legal prescriptions for their customers. This paper assesses these controversies. First, I offer a brief account of the basis and limits of the claim to be free to act on (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Dan W. Brock (2005). Shaping Future Children: Parental Rights and Societal Interests. Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (4):377–398.score: 30.0
  24. Dan W. Brock (1986). The Value of Prolonging Human Life. Philosophical Studies 50 (3):401 - 428.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Gillian Brock (2005). Egalitarianism, Ideals, and Cosmopolitan Justice. Philosophical Forum 36 (1):1–30.score: 30.0
    Cosmopolitans believe that all human beings have equal moral worth and that our responsibilities to others do not stop at borders. Various cosmopolitans offer different interpretations of how we should understand what is entailed by that equal moral worth and what responsibilities we have to each other in taking our equality seriously. Two suggestions are that a cosmopolitan should endorse a 'global difference principle' and a 'principle of global equality of opportunity'. In the first part of this paper I examine (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Stuart Brock (1993). Modal Fictionalism: A Response to Rosen. Mind 102 (405):147-150.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Gillian Brock (2005). Does Obligation Diminish with Distance? Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (1):3 – 20.score: 30.0
    Many people believe in what can be described as a 'concentric circles model of responsibilities to others' in which responsibilities are generally stronger to those physically or affectively closer to us - those who, on this model, occupy circles nearer to us. In particular, it is believed that we have special ties to compatriots and, moreover, that these ties entail stronger obligations than the obligations we have to non-compatriots. While I concede that our strongest obligations may generally be to those (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Dan W. Brock, Health Care Resource Prioritization and Discrimination Against Persons with Disabilities.score: 30.0
    In 1990 the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became federal law with the express purpose to “establish a clear and comprehensive national mandate for the elimination of discrimination against individuals with disabilities."l The act includes separate titles prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, public services, transportation and public accommodations. Since it prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in both public and private services and programs, in health care “it applies to programs provided by the government, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Stuart Brock (2012). The Puzzle of Imaginative Failure. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):443-463.score: 30.0
    The Puzzle of Imaginative Failure asks why, when readers are invited to do so, they so often fall short of imagining worlds where the moral facts are different. This is puzzling because we have no difficulty imagining worlds where the descriptive facts are different. Much of the philosophical controversy revolves around the question of whether the reader's lack of imagination in such cases is a result of psychological barriers (an inability or a difficulty on the reader's part to imagine what (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Gillian Brock (2011). How Does Equality Matter? Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (1):76-87.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Gillian Brock (2006). Humanitarian Intervention: Closing the Gap Between Theory and Practice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):277–291.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Gillian Brock (2002). Cosmopolitan Democracy and Justice: Held Versus Kymlicka. Studies in East European Thought 54 (4):325-347.score: 30.0
    There has been much interest in cosmopolitan models of democracy in recent times. Arguably, the most developed of these is the model articulated by David Held, so it is not surprising that it has received the most attention and criticism. In this paper, I outline Held's model of cosmopolitan democracy and consider the objections Will Kymlicka raises to this account. I argue that Kymlicka's objections do not undermine Held's central claims and that Held's cosmopolitanism remains a very promising model that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Dan W. Brock (2010). Creating Embryos for Use in Stem Cell Research. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):229-237.score: 30.0
    In this paper I will address whether the restriction on the creation of human embryos solely for the purpose of research in which they will be used and destroyed in the creation of human stem cell lines is ethically justified. Of course, a cynical but perhaps accurate reading of the new Obama policy is that leaving this restriction in place was done for political, not ethical, reasons, in light of the apparent public opposition to creating embryos for use in this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. H. Nakashima (1999). AI as Complex Information Processing. Minds and Machines 9 (1):57-80.score: 30.0
    In this article, I present a software architecture for intelligent agents. The essence of AI is complex information processing. It is impossible, in principle, to process complex information as a whole. We need some partial processing strategy that is still somehow connected to the whole. We also need flexible processing that can adapt to changes in the environment. One of the candidates for both of these is situated reasoning, which makes use of the fact that an agent is in a (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Gillian Brock (2007). Caney's Global Political Theory. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (2):239 – 254.score: 30.0
    In this critical discussion of Simon Caney's global political theory, I focus on two broad areas. In the first area, I consider Caney's suggestions concerning global equality of opportunity and note several problems with how we might develop these ideas. Some of the problems concern aggregation, while others point to difficulties with what equality of opportunity means in a culturally plural world, where different societies might value, construct, and rank goods in different ways. In the second broad area of criticism (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Stuart Brock (2004). The Ubiquitous Problem of Empty Names. Journal of Philosophy 101 (6):277 - 298.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Dan W. Brock (1987). Truth or Consequences: The Role of Philosophers in Policy-Making. Ethics 97 (4):786-791.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Dan W. Brock (2001). Children's Rights to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (2):163 – 177.score: 30.0
  39. Dan W. Brock (1988). Paternalism and Autonomy:Harm to Self. Joel Feinberg; Paternalistic Intervention. Donald VanDeVeer. Ethics 98 (3):550-.score: 30.0
  40. Gillian Brock (2005). Needs and Global Justice. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (57):51-.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that needs are tremendously salient in developing any plausible account of global justice. I begin by sketching a normative thought experiment that models ideal deliberating conditions. I argue that under such conditions we would choose principles of justice that ensure we are well positioned to be able to meet our needs. Indeed, as the experiment aims to show, any plausible account of distributive justice must make space for the special significance of our needs. I go (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Gillian Brock (1998). Morally Important Needs. Philosophia 26 (1-2):165-178.score: 30.0
    Frankfurt argues that there are two categories of needs that are at least prima facie morally important (relative to other claims). In this paper I examine Frankfurt's suggestion that two categories of needs, namely, nonvolitional and constrained volitional needs, are eligible for (at least prima facie) moral importance. I show both these categories to be defective because they do not necessarily meet Frankfurt's own criteria for what makes a need morally important. I suggest a further category of needs as being (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Gillian Brock (2005). What Do We Owe Co-Nationals and Non-Nationals? Why the Liberal Nationalist Account Fails and How We Can Do Better. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):127 – 151.score: 30.0
    Liberal nationalists have been trying to argue that a suitably sanitized version of nationalism - namely, one that respects and embodies liberal values - is not only morally defensible, but also of great moral value, especially on grounds liberals should find very appealing. Although there are plausible aspects to the idea and some compelling arguments are offered in defense of this position, one area still proves to be a point of considerable vulnerability for this project and that is the issue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Steen Brock (2011). A Resolute Reading of Cassirer's Anthropology. Synthese 179 (1):93 - 113.score: 30.0
    In the paper I try, resolutely, to associate the open ended encyclopedic character of Cassirer's philosophy with the core part of this philosophy concerning symbolic formation. In this way I try to supplement and strengthen the anthropology that Cassirer formulated in AN ESSAY ON MAN. Finally I discuss the historical character and value of this anthropology.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Gillian Brock (1994). Braybrooke on Needs. Ethics 104 (4):811-823.score: 30.0
    In 'Meeting Needs', Braybrooke argues that a new and improved version of utilitarianism can be constructed around making a priority of satisfying needs. In this paper I concentrate on Braybrooke's suggestion about the method for determining needs, and more generally, the method of settling issues concerning matters of need. (This emphasis is chosen since these problems are most devastating to his project as currently formulated.) I argue that Braybrooke's method is seriously flawed. Braybrooke believes that the process for settling issues (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. M. Norton Wise & David C. Brock (1998). The Culture of Quantum Chaos. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 29 (3):369-389.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Dan W. Brock (2006). How Much Is More Life Worth? Hastings Center Report 36 (3):17-19.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Gillian Brock & Quentin D. Atkinson (2008). What Can Examining the Psychology of Nationalism Tell Us About Our Prospects for Aiming at the Cosmopolitan Vision? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (2):165 - 179.score: 30.0
    Opponents of cosmopolitanism often dismiss the position on the grounds that cosmopolitan proposals are completely unrealistic and that they fly in the face of our human nature. We have deep psychological needs that are satisfied by national identification and so all cosmopolitan projects are doomed, or so it is argued. In this essay we examine the psychological grounds claimed to support the importance of nationalism to our wellbeing. We argue that the alleged human needs that nationalism is said to satisfy (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Gillian Brock & Soran Reader (2002). Needs-Centered Ethical Theory. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (4):425-434.score: 30.0
    Our aims in this paper are: (1) to indicate some of the many ways in which needs are an important part of the moral landscape, (2) to show that the dominant contemporary moral theories cannot adequately capture the moral significance of needs, indeed, that the dominant theories are inadequate to the extent that they cannot accommodate the insights which attention to needs yield, (3) to offer some sketches that should be helpful to future cartographers charting the domain of morally significant (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. D. W. Brock (2006). Is a Consensus Possible on Stem Cell Research? Moral and Political Obstacles. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (1):36-42.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 984