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Rob Clifton [25]Robert K. Clifton [7]Robert Clifton [2]
  1. Rob Clifton (2004). Quantum Entanglements: Selected Papers. Oxford University Press.
    Rob Clifton was one of the most brilliant and productive researchers in the foundations and philosophy of quantum theory, who died tragically at the age of 38. Jeremy Butterfield and Hans Halvorson collect fourteen of his finest papers here, drawn from the latter part of his career (1995-2002), all of which combine exciting philosophical discussion with rigorous mathematical results. Many of these papers break wholly new ground, either conceptually or technically. Others resolve a vague controversy intoa precise technical problem, which (...)
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  2. Rob Clifton, Jeffrey Bub & Hans Halvorson (2003). Characterizing Quantum Theory in Terms of Information-Theoretic Constraints. Foundations of Physics 33 (11):1561-1591.
    We show that three fundamental information-theoretic constraints -- the impossibility of superluminal information transfer between two physical systems by performing measurements on one of them, the impossibility of broadcasting the information contained in an unknown physical state, and the impossibility of unconditionally secure bit commitment -- suffice to entail that the observables and state space of a physical theory are quantum-mechanical. We demonstrate the converse derivation in part, and consider the implications of alternative answers to a remaining open question about (...)
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  3. Rob Clifton (2002). The Subtleties of Entanglement and its Role in Quantum Information Theory. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2002 (3):S150-S167.
    My aim in this paper is a modest one. I do not have any particular thesis to advance about the nature of entanglement, nor can I claim novelty for any of the material I shall discuss. My aim is simply to raise some questions about entanglement that spring naturally from certain developments in quantum information theory and are, I believe, worthy of serious consideration by philosophers of science. The main topics I discuss are different manifestations of quantum nonlocality, entanglement-assisted communication, (...)
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  4. Hans Halvorson & Rob Clifton (2002). No Place for Particles in Relativistic Quantum Theories? Philosophy of Science 69 (1):1-28.
    David Malament (1996) has recently argued that there can be no relativistic quantum theory of (localizable) particles. We consider and rebut several objections that have been made against the soundness of Malament’s argument. We then consider some further objections that might be made against the generality of Malament’s conclusion, and we supply three no‐go theorems to counter these objections. Finally, we dispel potential worries about the counterintuitive nature of these results by showing that relativistic quantum field theory itself explains the (...)
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  5. Hans Halvorson & Rob Clifton (2002). Reconsidering Bohr's Reply to EPR. In T. Placek & J. Butterfield (eds.), Non-locality and Modality. Kluwer. 3--18.
    Although Bohr's reply to the EPR argument is supposed to be a watershed moment in the development of his philosophy of quantum theory, it is difficult to find a clear statement of the reply's philosophical point. Moreover, some have claimed that the point is simply that Bohr is a radical positivist. In this paper, we show that such claims are unfounded. In particular, we give a mathematically rigorous reconstruction of Bohr's reply to the _original_ EPR argument that clarifies its logical (...)
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  6. Christian Wüthrich, Rob Clifton & Brian Hepburn (2002). Generic Incomparability of Infinite-Dimensional Entangled States. Physics Letters A 303:121-124.
    In support of a recent conjecture by Nielsen (1999), we prove that the phenomena of ‘incomparable entanglement’— whereby, neither member of a pair of pure entangled states can be transformed into the other via local operations and classical communication (LOCC)—is a generic feature when the states at issue live in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space.  2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
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  7. S. L. Zabell, Brian Skyrms, Elliott Sober, Malcolm R. Forster, Wayne C. Myrvold, William L. Harper, Rob Clifton, Itamar Pitowsky, Robyn M. Dawes & David Faust (2002). 10. It All Adds Up: The Dynamic Coherence of Radical Probabilism It All Adds Up: The Dynamic Coherence of Radical Probabilism (Pp. S98-S103). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 69 (S3).
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  8. Rob Clifton & Hans Halvorson (2001). Are Rindler Quanta Real? Inequivalent Particle Concepts in Quantum Field Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (3):417-470.
    Philosophical reflection on quantum field theory has tended to focus on how it revises our conception of what a particle is. However, there has been relatively little discussion of the threat to the ‘reality’ of particles posed by the possibility of inequivalent quantizations of a classical field theory, i.e. inequivalent representations of the algebra of observables of the field in terms of operators on a Hilbert space. The threat is that each representation embodies its own distinctive conception of what a (...)
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  9. Rob Clifton & Hans Halvorson (2001). Entanglement and Open Systems in Algebraic Quantum Field Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (1):1-31.
    Entanglement has long been the subject of discussion by philosophers of quantum theory, and has recently come to play an essential role for physicists in their development of quantum information theory. In this paper we show how the formalism of algebraic quantum field theory (AQFT) provides a rigorous framework within which to analyse entanglement in the context of a fully relativistic formulation of quantum theory. What emerges from the analysis are new practical and theoretical limitations on an experimenter's ability to (...)
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  10. Rob Clifton & Damian Pope, On the Nonlocality of the Quantum Channel in the Standard Teleportation Protocol.
    By exhibiting a violation of a novel form of the Bell-CHSH inequality, \.{Z}ukowski has recently established that the quantum correlations exploited in the standard perfect teleportation protocol cannot be recovered by any local hidden variables model. Allowing the quantum channel state in the protocol to be given by any density operator of two spin-1/2 particles, we show that a violation of a generalized form of \.{Z}ukowski's teleportation inequality can only occur if the channel state, considered by itself, violates a Bell-CHSH (...)
     
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  11. Kevin Davey & Rob Clifton (2001). Insufficient Reason in the ‘New Cosmological Argument’. Religious Studies 37 (4):485-490.
    In a recent article in this journal, Richard Gale and Alexander Pruss offer a new cosmological proof for the existence of God relying only on the Weak Principle of Sufficient Reason, W-PSR. We argue that their proof relies on applications of W-PSR that cannot be justified, and that our modal intuitions simply do not support W-PSR in the way Gale and Pruss take them to.
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  12. Rob Clifton (1999). 1.'Observables' versus beables. In Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.), From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 12.
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  13. Rob Clifton & Bradley Monton (1999). Losing Your Marbles in Wavefunction Collapse Theories. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (4):697 - 717.
    Peter Lewis ([1997]) has recently argued that the wavefunction collapse theory of GRW (Ghirardi, Rimini and Weber [1986]) can only solve the problem of wavefunction tails at the expense of predicting that arithmetic does not apply to ordinary macroscopic objects. More specifically, Lewis argues that the GRW theory must violate the enumeration principle: that 'if marble 1 is in the box and marble 2 is in the box and so on through marble n, then all n marbles are in the (...)
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  14. Rob Clifton & Laura Ruetsche (1999). Changing the Subject: Redei on Causal Dependence and Screening Off in Relativistic Quantum Field Theory. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):169.
    In a pair of articles (1996, 1997) and in his recent book (1998), Miklos Redei has taken enormous strides toward characterizing the conditions under which relativistic quantum field theory is a safe setting for the deployment of causal talk. Here, we challenge the adequacy of the accounts of causal dependence and screening off on which rests the relevance of Redei's theorems to the question of causal good behavior in the theory.
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  15. Rob Clifton & Laura Ruetsche (1999). Foundations of Statistical Physics, Spacetime Theories, and Quantum Field Theory-Changing the Subject: Redei on Causal Dependence and Screening Off in Relativistic Quantum Field Theory. Philosophy of Science 66 (3).
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  16. Hans Halvorson & Rob Clifton (1999). Maximal Beable Subalgebras of Quantum-Mechanical Observables. International Journal of Theoretical Physics 38:2441-2484.
    The centerpiece of Jeffrey Bub's book Interpreting the Quantum World is a theorem (Bub and Clifton 1996) which correlates each member of a large class of no-collapse interpretations with some 'privileged observable'. In particular, the Bub-Clifton theorem determines the unique maximal sublattice L(R,e) of propositions such that (a) elements of L(R,e) can be simultaneously determinate in state e, (b) L(R,e) contains the spectral projections of the privileged observable R, and (c) L(R,e) is picked out by R and e alone. In (...)
     
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  17. Rob Clifton, Scientific Explanation in Quantum Theory.
    In this paper (which is, at best, a work in progress), I discuss different modes of scientific explanation identified by philosophers (Hempel, Salmon, Kitcher, Friedman, Hughes) and examine how well or badly they capture the "explanations" of phenomena that modern quantum theory provides. I tentatively conclude that quantum explanation is best seen as "structural explanation", and spell out in detail how this works in the case of explaining vacuum correlations. Problems and prospects for structural explanation in quantum theory are also (...)
     
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  18. Rob Clifton (1996). On What Being a World Takes Away. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):158.
    In their article "On What It Takes To Be a World", David Albert and Jeffrey Barrett raise "a rather urgent question about what the proponents of a many-worlds interpretation [of quantum mechanics] can possibly mean by the term 'worlds' " (1995, 35). I argue that their considerations do not translate into an argument against the Many-Worlds conception of a world unless one requires that the dispositions that measurement devices display through the outcomes they record be explainable in terms of facts (...)
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  19. Rob Clifton (1996). The Properties of Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (3):371-398.
    Orthodox quantum mechanics includes the principle that an observable of a system possesses a well-defined value if and only if the presence of that value in the system is certain to be confirmed on measurement. Modal interpretations reject the controversial ‘only if’ half of this principle to secure definite outcomes for quantum measurements that leave the apparatus entangled with the object it has measured. However, using a result that turns on the construction of a Kochen–Specker contradiction, I argue that modal (...)
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  20. Rob Clifton (1995). Independently Motivating the Kochen-Dieks Modal Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (1):33-57.
    The distinguishing feature of ‘modal’ interpretations of quantum mechanics is their abandonment of the orthodox eigenstate–eigenvalue rule, which says that an observable possesses a definite value if and only if the system is in an eigenstate of that observable. Kochen's and Dieks' new biorthogonal decomposition rule for picking out which observables have definite values is designed specifically to overcome the chief problem generated by orthodoxy's rule, the measurement problem, while avoiding the no-hidden-variable theorems. Otherwise, their new rule seems completely ad (...)
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  21. Rob Clifton & Mark Hogarth (1995). The Definability of Objective Becoming in Minkowski Spacetime. Synthese 103 (3):355 - 387.
    In his recent article On Relativity Theory and Openness of the Future (1991), Howard Stein proves not only that one can define an objective becoming relation in Minkowski spacetime, but that there is only one possible definition available if one accepts certain natural assumptions about what it is for becoming to occur and for it to be objective. Stein uses the definition supplied by his proof to refute an argument due to Rietdijk (1966, 1976), Putnam (1967) and Maxwell (1985, 1988) (...)
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  22. Constantine Pagonis & Rob Clifton (1995). Unremarkable Contextualism: Dispositions in the Bohm Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 25 (2):281-296.
    One way to characterize dispositions is to take them to be reducible to categorical properties plus experimental arrangements. We argue that this view applied to Bohm 's ontological interpretation of quantum theory provides a good picture of the unremarkable nature of spin in that interpretation, and so explains how a simple realism of possessed values may be retained in the face of Kochen and Specker's theorem. With this in mind we discuss Redhead's influential analysis of Kochen and Specker's theorem which (...)
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  23. Robert Clifton & Mark Hogarth (1993). Time, Space and Philosophy. Philosophical Books 34 (2):123-125.
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  24. Martin R. Jones & Robert K. Clifton (1993). Against Experimental Metaphysics. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 18 (1):295-316.
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  25. Robert Clifton, Constantine Pagonis & Itamar Pitowsky (1992). Relativity, Quantum Mechanics and EPR. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:114 - 128.
    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument for the incompleteness of quantum mechanics involves two assumptions: one about locality and the other about when it is legitimate to infer the existence of an element-of-reality. Using one simple thought experiment, we argue that quantum predictions and the relativity of simultaneity require that both these assumptions fail, whether or not quantum mechanics is complete.
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  26. Robert K. Clifton (1991). The Structure and Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Philosophical Books 32 (3):189-191.
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  27. Robert K. Clifton, Michael L. G. Redhead & Jeremy N. Butterfield (1991). Generalization of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger Algebraic Proof of Nonlocality. Foundations of Physics 21 (2):149-184.
    We further develop a recent new proof (by Greenberger, Horne, and Zeilinger—GHZ) that local deterministic hidden-variable theories are inconsistent with certain strict correlations predicted by quantum mechanics. First, we generalize GHZ's proof so that it applies to factorable stochastic theories, theories in which apparatus hidden variables are causally relevant to measurement results, and theories in which the hidden variables evolve indeterministically prior to the particle-apparatus interactions. Then we adopt a more general measure-theoretic approach which requires that GHZ's argument be modified (...)
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  28. Robert K. Clifton (1990). Book Review:Schrodinger: Centenary Celebration of a Polymath C. W. Kilmister. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 57 (2):342-.
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  29. Robert K. Clifton, Jeremy N. Butterfield & Michael L. G. Redhead (1990). Nonlocal Influences and Possible Worlds--A Stapp in the Wrong Direction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (1):5-58.
    give a proof of the existence of nonlocal influences acting on correlated spin-1/2 particles in the singlet state which does not require any particular interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM). (Except Stapp holds that the proof fails under a many-worlds interpretation of QM—a claim we analyse in 1.2.) Recently, in responding to Redhead's ([1987], pp. 90-6) criticism that the Stapp 1 proof fails under an indeterministic interpretation of QM, Stapp [1989] (henceforth Stapp 2), has revised the logical structure of his proof (...)
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  30. Robert K. Clifton & Marilyn G. Regehr (1990). Toward a Sound Perspective on Modern Physics: Capra's Popularization of Mysticism and Theological Approaches Reexamined. Zygon 25 (1):73-104.
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  31. Robert K. Clifton (1989). Some Recent Controversy Over the Possibility of Experimentally Determining Isotropy in the Speed of Light. Philosophy of Science 56 (4):688-696.
    The most recent attempt at factually establishing a "true" value for the one-way velocity of light is shown to be faulty. The proposal consists of two round-trip photons travelling first in vacuo and then through a medium of refractive index n before returning to their common point of origin. It is shown that this proposal, as well as a similar one considered by Salmon (1977), presupposes that the one-way velocities of light are equal to the round-trip value. Furthermore, experiments of (...)
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  32. Rob Clifton, Introductory Notes on the Mathematics Needed for Quantum Theory.
    These are notes designed to bring the beginning student of the philosophy of quantum mechanics 'up to scratch' on the mathematical background needed to understand elementary finite-dimensional quantum theory. There are just three chapters: Ch. 1 'Vector Spaces'; Ch. 2 'Inner Product Spaces'; and Ch. 3 'Operators on Finite-Dimensional Complex Inner Product Spaces'. The notes are entirely self-contained and presuppose knowledge of only high school level algebra.
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