Search results for 'Rob Someren Greve' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rob van Someren Greve (2014). 'Ought', 'Can', and Fairness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (5):913-922.
    According to the principle that ‘ought’ implies ‘can’, it is never the case that you ought to do something you cannot do. While many accept this principle in some form, it also has its share of critics, and thus it seems desirable if an argument can be offered in its support. The aim of this paper is to examine a particular way in which the principle has been defended, namely, by appeal to considerations of fairness. In a nutshell, the idea (...)
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  2.  31
    Sebastian Grève & Felix Mühlhölzer (2014). Wittgenstein’s Philosophy of Mathematics: Felix Mühlhölzer in Conversation with Sebastian Grève. Nordic Wittgenstein Review 3 (2):151-180.
    Sebastian Grève interviews Felix Mühlhölzer on his work on the philosophy of mathematics.
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  3. Rob van Someren Greve (2011). Wishful Thinking in Moral Theorizing: Comment on Enoch. Utilitas 23 (04):447-450.
    David Enoch recently defended the idea that there are valid inferences of the form ‘it would be good if p, therefore, p’. I argue that Enoch's proposal allows us to infer the absurd conclusion that ours is the best of all possible worlds.
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  4. Rob van Someren Greve (2014). The Value of Practical Usefulness. Philosophical Studies 168 (1):167-177.
    Some moral theories, such as objective forms of consequentialism, seem to fail to be practically useful: they are of little to no help in trying to decide what to do. Even if we do not think this constitutes a fatal flaw in such theories, we may nonetheless agree that being practically useful does make a moral theory a better theory, or so some have suggested. In this paper, I assess whether the uncontroversial respect in which a moral theory can be (...)
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  5. Rob van Someren Greve (2013). Objective Consequentialism and Avoidable Imperfections. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):481-492.
    There are two distinct views on how to formulate an objective consequentialist account of the deontic status of actions, actualism and possibilism. On an actualist account, what matters to the deontic status of actions is only the value of the outcome an action would have, if performed. By contrast, a possibilist account also takes into account the value of the outcomes that an action could have. These two views come apart in their deontic verdicts when an agent is imperfect in (...)
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  6. Rob van Someren Greve (2012). Can Reasons Be Self-Undermining? Philosophia 40 (2):411-414.
    The characterization of objective, normative reasons to φ as facts (or truths) that count in favor of φ-ing is widely accepted. But are there any further conditions that considerations which count in favor of φ-ing must meet, in order to count as a reason to φ? In this brief paper, I consider and reject one such condition, recently proposed by Caspar Hare.
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  7.  53
    Sebastian Sunday Grève (2015). The Importance of Understanding Each Other in Philosophy. Philosophy 90 (2):213-239.
    What is philosophy? How is it possible? This essay constitutes an attempt to contribute to a better understanding of what might be a good answer to either of these questions by reflecting on one particular characteristic of philosophy, specifically as it presents itself in the philosophical practice of Socrates, Plato and Wittgenstein. Throughout this essay, I conduct the systematic discussion of my topic in parallel lines with the historico-methodological comparison of my three main authors. First, I describe a certain neglected (...)
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  8.  44
    J. Greve (2012). Emergence in Sociology: A Critique of Nonreductive Individualism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (2):188-223.
    The emergentist position that R. Keith Sawyer has formulated, nonreductive individualism, contains three propositions. First, that social characteristics must always be realized in individuals; second, that it is nevertheless possible to understand social properties as irreducible; and third, that therefore it is possible to demonstrate how social properties are able to exercise independent causal influences on individuals and their properties. It is demonstrated that Sawyer is not able to meet an objection that Kim has formulated against the analogous position in (...)
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  9.  71
    Jens Greve (2013). Response to R. Keith Sawyer. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (2):246-256.
    R. Keith Sawyer rightly claimed that the formulation of several cross-level regularities does not disprove the “autonomy” of sciences. Nevertheless, first, this autonomy becomes gradual because cross-level regularities narrow the scope for strong emergence and, second, these examples do not disprove the metaphysical premises of Kim’s critique. Sawyer and I concur on the thesis according to which the proof of strong emergence is in part an empirical question. However, it also depends on the concept of individualism applied whether a description (...)
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  10.  1
    Hedderik Rijn, Maarten Someren & Han Maas (2003). Modeling Developmental Transitions on the Balance Scale Task. Cognitive Science 27 (2):227-257.
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  11. Wilfried Greve (2000). Abraham in Kierkegaard Research. Kierkegaardiana 21:7-18.
     
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  12.  10
    Wilfried Greve (1998). El dudoso eticista. O lo uno, o lo otro II, de Kierkegaard. Enrahonar 29 (1):9-3.
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  13.  2
    Bent Greve (2015). European Foundations of the Welfare State. The European Legacy 20 (5):562-563.
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  14.  15
    Werner Greve & Dirk Wentura (2010). True Lies: Self-Stabilization Without Self-Deception☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):721-730.
    Self-deception entails apparent conceptual paradoxes and poses the dilemma between two competing needs: the need for stability of the self-concept, on the one hand, and the need to accept reality, on the other. It is argued, first, that conceptual difficulties can be avoided by distinguishing two levels of explanation. Whereas, in a personal language, “the person” deceives him- or her-self, a cognitive approach explains this self-deception by reference to the interplay of cognitive processes of which the person is not aware. (...)
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  15.  5
    Daniel Bullock, Douglas Greve & Frank Guenther (1992). Do Reaches in the Dark Shed Sufficient Light on Internal Representations? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):330-332.
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  16. Carson Rob (1992). Washington's I-119. Hastings Center Report 22.
     
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  17.  3
    Werner Greve & Axel Buchner (1995). Speaking of Beliefs: Reporting or Constituting Mental Entities? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):391.
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  18.  4
    Bent Greve (2003). Introduction: The End of the Welfare State? The European Legacy 8 (5):557-558.
  19.  3
    Bent Greve (2003). Ways Forward for the Welfare State in the Twenty-First Century. The European Legacy 8 (5):611-630.
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  20.  6
    Anniken Greve (2012). Fiction and Conversation. Philosophical Investigations 35 (3-4):238-259.
    Exploring Rhees's analogy between everyday conversation and literature, the paper suggests a conception of form that encourages us to see literary works as contributions to conversation in virtue of their concern. How we might read for the concern of a literary work is exemplified by readings of Ibsen's Ghosts and The Wild Duck. These readings suggest that Rhees's analogy not only throws light on the communicative powers of literature: viewing everyday talk in the light of works of literature also gives (...)
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  21. Bent Greve (1996). Citizen, State, and Social Welfare in Britain 1830–1990. History of European Ideas 22 (2):129-130.
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  22. Bent Greve (1994). Development in the EC and its Impact on the Welfare State in Europe—Trends Towards Convergence in the Last ten Years. History of European Ideas 19 (1-3):147-152.
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  23. Jens Greve & Annette Schnabel (eds.) (2011). Emergenz: Zur Analyse Und Erklärung Komplexer Strukturen. Suhrkamp.
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  24. Bent Greve (2002). Review of Alexander Hicks: Social Democracy and Welfare Capitalism. A Century of Income Security Politics. Cornell, Cornell University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 7 (3).
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  25. Bent Greve (2001). Review of Christopher Howard: The Hidden Welfare State, Tax Expenditures and Social Policy in the United States. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 6 (4):540-541.
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  26. Bent Greve (2001). Review of David Schmidtz and Robert E. Goodin: Social Welfare and Individual Responsibility. Cambridge University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 6 (3):396-397.
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  27. Bent Greve (2000). Review of Ellen Frankel Paul (Eds.) Et. Al.: The Welfare State. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 5 (2).
     
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  28. Bent Greve (2002). Review of Meritocracy and Economic Inequality (Eds) Kennt Arrow, Samuel Bowles and Steven Durlau. NJ., Princeton. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 7 (5):660-661.
     
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  29. Bent Greve (1998). Review of Pocock: JGA Et. Al.: The Varieties of British Political Thought, 1500-1800. Cambridge University Press. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 3 (2).
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  30. B. Greve (2002). Social Democracy and Welfare Capitalism. A Century of Income Security Politics. By Alexander Hicks. The European Legacy 7 (3):404-404.
     
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  31. Bent Greve (1996). Social Work in a Changing Europe. History of European Ideas 22 (2):186-186.
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  32. A. Greve (2002). The Development of Durkheim's Social Realism. By Robert Alun Jones. The European Legacy 7 (2):244-245.
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  33. B. Greve (1998). The Varieties of British Political Thought, 1500-1800. By JGA Pocock, Gordon J. Schochet, and Lois G. Schwoerer. The European Legacy 3:105-105.
     
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  34. B. Greve (2000). The Welfare State. Edited by Ellen by Ellen Frankel Paul Et Al. The European Legacy 5 (2):297-297.
     
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  35. B. Greve (1998). Winston Churchill: Resolution, Defiance, Magnamity, Good Will. Edited by R. Crosby Kemper, III. The European Legacy 3:109-109.
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  36. K. -M. Kodalle, W. Greve, J. Disse & J. Cattepoel (1993). Denken der Existenz. Einübungen in Kierkegaard. Philosophische Rundschau 40 (4):310-319.
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  37. James Rob (2011). Chatter in the Hizb: The Hizb Ut Tahrir Web Forum: An Ideology of Violence? Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 30:213-235.
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  38.  21
    Matthew Frise (2014). What God Only Knows: A Reply to Rob Lovering. Religious Studies 50 (2):245-254.
    Rob Lovering has recently argued that God is not omniscient on the grounds that (1) in order to be omniscient a subject must not only know all truths always but also know what it's like not to know a truth, and (2) God cannot fulfil both of these requirements. I show that Lovering's argument is unsuccessful since he inadequately supports (1) and (2), and since there are several serious doubts about (2). I also show that Lovering does not otherwise indicate (...)
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  39.  4
    Henrik Friberg‐Fernros (2015). A Critique of Rob Lovering's Criticism of the Substance View. Bioethics 29 (3):211-216.
    In his article, The Substance View: a critique, Rob Lovering argues that the substance view – according to which the human embryo is a person entitled to human rights – leads to such implausible implications that this view should be abandoned. In this article I respond to his criticism by arguing that either his arguments fail because the proponents of the substance view are not obligated to hold positions which may be considered absurd, or because the positions which they are (...)
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  40. Perry L. Glanzer (2008). Rethinking the Boundaries and Burdens of Parental Authority Over Education: A Response to Rob Reich's Case Study of Homeschooling. Educational Theory 58 (1):1-16.
    Rob Reich’s claim that fruitful discussions about the balance among state, parental, and children’s educational interests would benefit by contemplating the widespread phenomenon of homeschooling is a welcome suggestion. His policy recommendations, however, place an unjustified burden on parents to show the adequacy of homeschooling arrangements instead of placing the burden on the state to clarify commonly agreed‐upon outcome measures. In this essay, Perry Glanzer argues that Reich places the burden on parents by overstating the threat that the freedom given (...)
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  41. Douglas Kellner, The Virtual by Rob Shields London and New York: Routledge, 2003.
    In The Virtual, Rob Shields puts virtuality in with the key categories of contemporary social theory such as subjectivity, agency, structure, and the spaces and temporalities between the modern and the postmodern. Shields has rescued the term and the idea of the virtual from utopian futurists like Howard Rheingold and Nicholas Negroponte who use it to hype emergent technologies and forms of culture as the magical vehicles and entry points to new worlds and identities. The works of these digerati, ideologues (...)
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  42.  5
    D. Benatar (2009). Teaching Moral Theories is an Option: Reply to Rob Lawlor. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):395-396.
    In his response to my earlier criticism, Rob Lawlor argues that the benefits I suggest can be derived from teaching moral theories in applied ethics courses can be obtained in other ways. In my reply, I note that because I never claimed the benefits could be obtained only from teaching moral theories, Dr Lawlor’s response fails to refute my earlier argument that some attention to moral theories is an option in applied ethics courses.
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  43.  6
    Paolo Magagnoli (2012). Moulène, Rancière and 24 Objets de Grève: Productive Ambivalence or Reifying Opacity? Philosophy of Photography 3 (1):155-171.
    First exhibited in 1999, Jean-Luc Moulène's 24 Objets de Grève is a photographic archive printed in a range of different formats, portraying a variety of products made by French workers on strike between the 1970s and the 1990s. These comprise of scarves, T-shirts, dolls, geographical maps, cigarettes, facsimile banknotes, perfume bottles and other items. The objects were aimed at financially supporting the strikers and attracting the solidarity of the general public. Often destroyed after their use, they were not created with (...)
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  44. Michael Pusey (1994). Reviews : Peter Beilharz, Mark Considine and Rob Watts, Arguing About the Welfare State: The Australian Experience (Allen and Unwin, 1992). Thesis Eleven 38 (1):190-193.
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  45. Raymond Murphy (2012). Sandra Moog and Rob Stones, Eds, Nature, Social Relations and Human Needs: Essays in Honour of Ted Benton. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. 296 Pp. ISBN 978-0-230-20115-6, Hardback,£ 64.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 11 (4):510-514.
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  46. David Chaney (1991). Reviews : Rob Shields, Places on the Margin: Alternative Geographies of Modernity, London: Routledge, 1991, £35.00, Xiii + 334 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):466-468.
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  47.  73
    Sheila Shaver (1989). Reviews : Rob Watts, The Foundations of the National Welfare State (Sydney, Allen and Unwin, 1987). Thesis Eleven 24 (1):170-174.
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  48.  42
    H. Upton (2010). Shades of Goodness: Gradability, Demandingness and the Structure of Moral Theories * by Rob Lawlor. Analysis 70 (3):593-595.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  49.  4
    Dominique Leydet (forthcoming). Grève étudiante et démocratie : d'une crise à l'autre. Theory and Event 15 (3).
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  50.  7
    Robert W. Binkley (1998). Johan van Benthem, Frans H. Van Eemeren, Rob Grootendorst and Frank Veltman (Eds.), Logic and Argumentation. Argumentation 12 (4):508-512.
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