Search results for 'Robert A. Cummins' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  18
    Robert Cummins (2010). The World in the Head. OUP Oxford.
    Robert Cummins presents a series of essays motivated by the following question: Is the mind a collection of beliefs and desires that respond to and condition our feeling and perceptual experiences, or is this just a natural way to talk about it? What sort of conceptual framework do we need to understand what is really going on in our brains?
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  2. Robert Cummins (2013). The World in the Head. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The World in the Head collects the best of Robert Cummins' papers on mental representation and psychological explanation. Cummins' essays are motivated by the following question: Is the mind a collection of beliefs and desires that respond to and condition our feeling and perceptual experiences, or is this just a natural way to talk about it? What sort of conceptual framework do we need to understand what is really going on in our brains?
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  3. M. R. Ayers, Phillip D. Cummins, Robert Fogelin, Don Garrett, Edwin McCann, Charles J. McCracken, George Pappas, G. A. J. Rogers, Barry Stroud, Ian Tipton, Margaret D. Wilson & Kenneth Winkler (1998). The Empiricists: Critical Essays on Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection of essays on themes in the work of John Locke , George Berkeley , and David Hume , provides a deepened understanding of major issues raised in the Empiricist tradition. In exploring their shared belief in the experiential nature of mental constructs, The Empiricists illuminates the different methodologies of these great Enlightenment philosophers and introduces students to important metaphysical and epistemological issues including the theory of ideas, personal identity, and skepticism. It will be especially useful in courses devoted (...)
     
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  4.  14
    Robert C. Cummins, James Blackmon & David Byrd (2005). What Systematicity Isn't. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:405-408.
    In “On Begging the Systematicity Question,” Wayne Davis criticizes the suggestion of Cummins et al. that the alleged systematicity of thought is not as obvious as is sometimes supposed, and hence not reliable evidence for the language of thought hypothesis. We offer a brief reply.
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  5. Robert Cummins (1982). Mind in Science: A History of Explanations in Psychology and Physics by Richard L. Gregory. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 73:441-441.
     
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  6. Robert A. Cummins, G. C. Myers, E. L. Cornell, A. I. Gates & A. T. Poffenberger (1918). New York Branch of the American Psychological Association. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (5):130-134.
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  7.  7
    Robert Cummins & Martin Roth (2010). Traits Have Not Evolved to Function the Way They Do Because of a Past Advantage. In Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Wiley-Blackwell Pub. 72--88.
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  8.  32
    Robert C. Cummins (1991). Form, Interpretation, and the Uniqueness of Content: A Response to Morris. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 1 (1):31-42.
    In response to Michael Morris, I attempt to refute the crucial second premise of the argument, which states that the formality condition cannot be satisfied “non-stipulatively” in computational systems. I defend the view of representation urged in Meaning and Mental Representation against the charge that it makes content stipulative and therefore irrelevant to the explanation of cognition. Some other reservations are expressed.
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  9.  9
    Robert C. Cummins (1993). Book Review:A Theory of Content and Other Essays Jerry Fodor. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 60 (1):172-.
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  10. Robert C. Cummins (2002). Haugeland on Representation and Intentionality. In Hugh Clapin (ed.), Philosophy of Mental Representation. Oxford University Press
    Haugeland doesn’t have what I would call a theory of mental representation. Indeed, it isn’t clear that he believes there is such a thing. But he does have a theory of intentionality and a correlative theory of objectivity, and it is this material that I will be discussing in what follows. It will facilitate the discussion that follows to have at hand some distinctions and accompanying terminology I introduced in Representations, Targets and Attitudes (Cummins, 1996; RTA hereafter). Couching the (...)
     
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  11.  46
    Denise D. Cummins, Robert C. Cummins & Pierre Poirier (2003). Cognitive Evolutionary Psychology Without Representational Nativism. Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 15 (2):143-159.
    A viable evolutionary cognitive psychology requires that specific cognitive capacities be (a) heritable and (b) ‘quasi-independent’ from other heritable traits. They must be heritable because there can be no selection for traits that are not. They must be quasi-independent from other heritable traits, since adaptive variations in a specific cognitive capacity could have no distinctive consequences for fitness if effecting those variations required widespread changes in other unrelated traits and capacities as well. These requirements would be satisfied by innate cognitive (...)
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  12.  29
    Joseph Levine (1987). The Nature of Psychological Explanation by Robert Cummins: A Critical Notice. Philosophical Review 96 (2):249-274.
  13.  44
    Ron Amundson & Laurence D. Smith (1984). Clark Hull, Robert Cummins, and Functional Analysis. Philosophy of Science 51 (December):657-666.
    Robert Cummins has recently used the program of Clark Hull to illustrate the effects of logical positivist epistemology upon psychological theory. On Cummins's account, Hull's theory is best understood as a functional analysis, rather than a nomological subsumption. Hull's commitment to the logical positivist view of explanation is said to have blinded him to this aspect of this theory, and thus restricted its scope. We will argue that this interpretation of Hull's epistemology, though common, is mistaken. Hull's (...)
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  14.  1
    Robert A. Larmer (2008). Miracles, Physicalism, and the Laws of Nature: ROBERT A. LARMER. Religious Studies 44 (2):149-159.
    In his paper ‘Miracles: metaphysics, physics, and physicalism’, 1 Kirk McDermid appears to have two primary goals. The first is to demonstrate that my account of how God might produce a miracle without violating any laws of nature is radically flawed. The second is to suggest two alternative accounts, one suitable for a deterministic world, one suitable for an indeterministic world, which allow for the occurrence of a miracle without violation of the laws of nature, yet do not suffer from (...)
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  15.  2
    Robert A. Oakes (1976). Religious Experience and Rational Certainty*: ROBERT A. OAKES. Religious Studies 12 (3):311-318.
    The purpose of this paper is to clear up the long-standing veritable mountain of misinterpretation, perpetuated from critic to critic, concerning the admittedly problematic concept of self-authenticating religious experience. While it may well be the case, as many have argued, that a sort of ‘experience’ about which one could not be mistaken is simply a logically impossible state of affairs, this cannot be known to be the case so long as what is under attack is a bogus concept, obviously absurd, (...)
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  16. Robert A. Larmer (2009). Interpreting Hume on Miracles: ROBERT A. LARMER. Religious Studies 45 (3):325-338.
    Contemporary commentators on Hume's essay, ‘Of miracles’ have increasingly tended to argue that Hume never intended to suggest that testimonial evidence must always be insufficient to justify belief in a miracle. This is in marked contrast to earlier commentators who interpreted Hume as intending to demonstrate that testimonial evidence is incapable in principle of ever establishing rational belief in a miracle. In this article I argue that this traditional interpretation is the correct one.
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  17. Robert A. Oakes (1980). Classical Theism and Pantheism: A Reply to Professor Quinn: ROBERT A. OAKES. Religious Studies 16 (3):353-356.
    I am grateful to Philip Quinn for his thorough and penetrating critique of my paper on classical theism and pantheism. He has given me much to think about, and it would be philosophically remiss of me not to acknowledge that – in the light of his remarks – the argument which I employed in defence of the thesis that classical theism implies a version of pantheism might well benefit from some amendment. However, the purpose of this brief counter-rejoinder is to (...)
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  18. Robert A. Oakes (1977). Classical Theism and Pantheism: A Victory for Process Theism?: ROBERT A. OAKES. Religious Studies 13 (2):167-173.
    In Anselm's Discovery , Professor Hartshorne makes the rather startling and counterintuitive claim that ‘…there is indeed no issue between theism and pantheism. We all exist in the divine being, as St Paul said.’ 1 Classical or orthodox theists, it seems eminently fair to say, can be expected to recoil from any such suggestion with more than a little indignation. First of all, it might well be objected that Hartshorne - as a ‘process theist’ - is not a classical theist, (...)
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  19. Robert A. Segal (1978). Eliade's Theory of Millenarianism: ROBERT A. SEGAL. Religious Studies 14 (2):159-173.
    To the extent that Mircea Eliade is concerned with millenarianism he is concerned with it as only an instance of religious phenomena generally and is concerned with its meaning rather than its cause. Yet presupposed in the meaning he finds is a theory of its cause, and that theory is worth examining both because it elucidates Eliade's approach to religion as a whole and because as an explanation of millenarianism it is atypical and even unique.
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  20.  1
    Robert A. Oakes (1972). Reply to Professor Rachels: ROBERT A. OAKES. Religious Studies 8 (2):165-167.
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  21. Clarence Wunderlin Jr (2012). The Image of the Entrepreneur and the Language of the Market: Robert A. Taft, Market Rhetoric, and Political Argument, 1933-1944. [REVIEW] Libertarian Papers 4.
    During his first decade on the national political stage , Robert A. Taft contributed to a lively “Old Right” conservative critique of the New Deal’s efforts to achieve economic recovery, promote sustainable growth, and convert to a postwar peacetime economy. This paper examines the senator’s market rhetoric—the ideas on the market, entrepreneurship, and the role of the state that he employed in political arguments after 1935—to understand the foundation of his libertarian brand of conservatism. The following article argues that (...)
     
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  22.  4
    Clarence Wunderlin Jr (2012). The Image of the Entrepreneur and the Language of the Market: Robert A. Taft, Market Rhetoric, and Political Argument, 1933-1944. [REVIEW] Libertarian Papers 4.
    During his first decade on the national political stage , Robert A. Taft contributed to a lively “Old Right” conservative critique of the New Deal’s efforts to achieve economic recovery, promote sustainable growth, and convert to a postwar peacetime economy. This paper examines the senator’s market rhetoric—the ideas on the market, entrepreneurship, and the role of the state that he employed in political arguments after 1935—to understand the foundation of his libertarian brand of conservatism. The following article argues that (...)
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  23. David Baldwin & Mark Haugaard (eds.) (2016). Robert A. Dahl: An Unended Quest. Routledge.
    This book is devoted to the work of Robert A. Dahl, who passed away in 2014. Dahl was one of the most important American political scientists and normative democratic theorists of the post-war era, and he was also an influential teacher who mentored some of the most significant academics of the next two generations of American political science. As an incredibly productive scholar he had a career that spanned more than half a century, his first book was published in (...)
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  24. John Orth Riedl & Robert A. Baker (1940). A Catalogue of Renaissance Philosophers, 1350-1650. Compiled by, Robert A. Baker [and Others]. Marquette University Press.
     
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  25. Robert A. Smith Iii (1974). 17 Our Passport to Evolutionary Awareness Robert A. Smith, III. In John Warren White (ed.), Frontiers of Consciousness: The Meeting Ground Between Inner and Outer Reality. Julian Press
     
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  26.  14
    Joelle M. Abi-Rached (2011). REVIEW: Robert A. Aronowitz. Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):79-82.
    “Breast cancer is all around us.” This is how Robert Aronowitz, a medical doctor, opens his timely Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. We are all familiar with the truism that “one in eight American women” will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. The pink ribbon has come to symbolize both solidarity and hope. Mammograms and “Self-Breast Examination” have become part of women’s daily routine, if not a spectre haunting their daily lives. Yet the (...)
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  27.  5
    Donald W. Light (2000). The Managed Care Blues and How to Cure Them, by Walter A. Zelman and Robert A. Berenson. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 1998. 240 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (1):138-141.
    In a new and important book entitled TheManagedCareBluesandHowtoCureThem, a lifetime consumer advocate and a surgeon who witnessed the excesses and unaccountable errors of his colleagues under fee for service explain with deft hands the promise of managed care, its problems, and solutions to them. Walter Zelman and Robert Berenson show empathy for the consumer backlash, provider resentment, and the patients' rights movement that has spawned a thousand bills to prevent possibly unethical actions. Yet they believe these efforts to regulate (...)
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  28.  25
    Russell Blackford (2012). Robots and Reality: A Reply to Robert Sparrow. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):41-51.
    We commonly identify something seriously defective in a human life that is lived in ignorance of important but unpalatable truths. At the same time, some degree of misapprehension of reality may be necessary for individual health and success. Morally speaking, it is unclear just how insistent we should be about seeking the truth. Robert Sparrow has considered such issues in discussing the manufacture and marketing of robot ‘pets’, such as Sony’s doglike ‘AIBO’ toy and whatever more advanced devices (...)
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  29.  50
    Kevin Carnahan (2013). Religion, and Not Just Religious Reasons, in the Public Square: A Consideration of Robert Audi's and Nicholas Wolterstorff's Religion in the Public Square. Philosophia 41 (2):397-409.
    For the last several decades, philosophers have wrestled with the proper place of religion in liberal societies. Usually, the debates among these philosophers have started with the articulation of various conceptions of liberalism and then proceeded to locate religion in the context of these conceptions. In the process, however, too little attention has been paid to the way religion is conceived. Drawing on the work of Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff, two scholars who are often read as holding (...)
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  30.  26
    Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (1977). Theories of Truth and Semantical Primitives. Journal of Philosophical Logic 6 (1):349 - 354.
    Robert cummins has recently attacked this line of argument: if p is a semantically primitive predicate of a first order language l, then p requires its own clause in the definition of satisfaction integral to a definition of truth of l. thus if l has infinitely many such p, the satisfaction clause cannot be completed and truth for l will remain undefined. against this cummins argues that a single clause in a general base theory for l can (...)
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  31. Robert Mccauley (1986). Science as Cognitive Process: Toward an Empirical Philosophy of Science by Robert A. Rubinstein; Charles D. Laughlin,; John McManus. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 77:112-113.
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  32.  2
    A. K. Giri (2011). Sociology as a Quest for a Good Society: A Conversation with Robert Bellah. Journal of Human Values 17 (1):1-22.
    Quest for a good society has a long pedigree in sociological thought and critical reflections. It vibrates with many themes of liberation, morality and justice in classical sociology as pioneered by thinkers such as Marx and Durkheim and themes of decent society and creative society in recent theoretical discourses. The present essay discusses this quest for a good society in contemporary social sciences with a detailed discussion of the work of Robert N. Bellah, the pre-eminent sociologist of our times. (...)
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  33.  2
    Robert A. Preston (1967). "Theories of Knowledge: A Critical Introduction," by Robert Ackermann. Modern Schoolman 44 (2):197-198.
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  34.  98
    Richard L. Moreland & Sascha Topolinski (2010). The Mere Exposure Phenomenon: A Lingering Melody by Robert Zajonc. Emotion Review 2 (4):329-339.
    The mere exposure phenomenon (repeated exposure to a stimulus is sufficient to improve attitudes toward that stimulus) is one of the most inspiring phenomena associated with Robert Zajonc’s long and productive career in social psychology. In the first part of this article, Richard Moreland (who was trained by Zajonc in graduate school) describes his own work on exposure and learning, and on the relationships among familiarity, similarity, and attraction in person perception. In the second part, Sascha Topolinski (a recent (...)
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  35.  5
    Matthew J. Nestor (forthcoming). Narrow Structuralism: Paving a Middle Path Between Cummins and Millikan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTMillikan [2000] has levelled a number of persuasive criticisms against Cummins's [1996] theory of mental representation. In this paper, I pave a middle path in the debate between Cummins [2000] and Millikan [2000] to answer two questions. How are representations applied to targets? How is the content of a representation determined? The result is a new theory of mental representation, which I call narrow structuralism.
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  36.  8
    Andrew Ali Aghapour (2014). Defining “Religion” as Natural: A Critical Invitation to Robert McCauley. Zygon 49 (3):708-715.
    Previous critics have argued that Robert McCauley defines religion and science selectively and arbitrarily, cutting them to fit his model in Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not. McCauley has responded that final definitions are “overrated” and that artificial distinctions can serve an important role in naturalistic investigation. I agree with this position but argue that a genealogy of the category of religion is crucial to the methodology that McCauley describes. Since the inherent ambiguity of religion will undermine (...)
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  37. G. William Barnard (2005). Pt. 3. James and Mysticism. For an Engaged Reading : William James and the Varieties of Postmodern Religious Experience / Grace M. Jantzen ; Asian Religions and Mysticism : The Legacy of William James in the Study of Religions / Richard King ; James and Freud on Mysticism / Robert A. Segal ; Mystical Assessments : Jamesian Reflections on Spiritual Judgments. [REVIEW] In Jeremy R. Carrette (ed.), William James and the Varieties of Religious Experience: A Centenary Celebration. Routledge
  38.  11
    Nathaniel T. Wilcox (forthcoming). Robert A. Millikan Meets the Credibility Revolution: Comment on Harrison , ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance’. Journal of Economic Methodology:1-9.
    Millikan's famous oil drop experiment is scrutinized from the viewpoint of the methodological dicta of the credibility revolution.
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  39.  5
    Carlos J. Moya (forthcoming). Frankfurtian Reflections: A Critical Discussion of Robert Lockie’s “Three Recent Frankfurt Cases”. Philosophia:1-21.
    In a recent article, Robert Lockie brings about a critical examination of three Frankfurtstyle cases designed by David Widerker and Derk Pereboom. His conclusion is that these cases do not refute either the Principle of Alternative Possibilities or some cognate leeway principle for moral responsibility. Though I take the conclusion to be true, I contend that Lockie's arguments do not succeed in showing it. I concentrate on Pereboom's Tax Evasion 2. After presenting Pereboom's example and analyzing its structure, I (...)
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  40.  4
    Giovanni Gellera (2013). The Philosophy of Robert Forbes: A Scottish Scholastic Response to Cartesianism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (2):191-211.
    In the second half of the seventeenth century, philosophy teaching in the Scottish universities gradually moved from scholasticism to Cartesianism. Robert Forbes, regent at Marischal College and King's College, Aberdeen, was a strenuous opponent of Descartes. The analysis of the philosophy of Forbes and of his teacher Patrick Gordon sheds light on the relationship between Scottish Reformed scholasticism and the reception of Descartes in Scotland.
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  41.  6
    Morgan Luck (2014). Robert A. Larmer, The Legitimacy of Miracles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (2):235-240.
    This is a good book. It is good because: (a) it outlines well the central arguments of the debate (that is, the arguments relating to what a miracle is, whether they are possible, whether we can have evidence of their occurrence, and what would follow from such evidence were we to have it); (b) it furthers the debate; and (c) it is a clearly written. If you are a philosopher religion whose research area is miracles, the book is a must-read. (...)
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  42.  6
    Gilbert A. Davies (1931). Translations From the Greek Anthology. By Robert A. Furness. Pp. 239. London: Jonathan Cape, 1931. 10s. 6d. The Classical Review 45 (05):202-.
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  43.  1
    Peter Taylor (1993). Pioneer Ecologist: The Life and Work of Victor Ernest Shelford, 1877-1968 by Robert A. Croker; Foundations of Ecology: Classic Papers with Commentaries by Leslie A. Real; James H. Brown. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 84:177-179.
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  44. Richard Burkhardt Jr (1984). Ethology: Its Nature and Relations with Other Sciences by Robert A. Hinde. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 75:219-220.
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  45. George Sarton (1930). Science and the New Civilization by Robert A. Millikan; Humanism and America by Norman Foerster. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 14:446-449.
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  46. Alan Shapiro (2001). A History Of Color: The Evolution Of Theories Of Lights And Color By Robert A. Crone. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:145-145.
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  47. Richard A. Shweder (1999). Encomium for Robert A. LeVine. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 27 (2):235-244.
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  48. Richard A. Shweder (1999). Encomium for Robert A. LeVine. Ethos 27 (2):235-244.
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  49.  20
    Gert Goeminne (2013). Who is Afraid of the Political? A Response to Robert Scharff and Michel Puech. Foundations of Science 18 (2):355-360.
    In their respective commentaries to my article “Postphenomenology and the Politics of Sustainable Technology” both Robert Scharff and Michel Puech take issue with my postphenomenological inroad into the politics of technology. In a first step I try to accommodate the suggestions and objections raised by Scharff by making my account of the political more explicit. Consequently, I argue how an antagonistic relational conceptualisation of the political allows me to address head on Puech’s plea to leave politics behind and move (...)
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  50.  12
    Dean Moyar (2012). How the Good Obligates in Hegel's Conception ofSittlichkeit: A Response to Robert Stern'sUnderstanding Moral Obligation. Inquiry 55 (6):584-605.
    Abstract In Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Robert Stern argues that Hegel has a social command view of obligation. On this view, there is an element of social command or social sanction that must be added to a judgment of the good in order to bring about an obligation. I argue to the contrary that Hegel's conception of conscience, and thus the individual's role in obligation, is more central to his account than the social dimension. While agreeing with (...)
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