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  1. Robert A. Hinde (2008). Bending the Rules: The Flexibility of Absolutes in Modern Life. OUP Oxford.
    Do-unto-others-as-you-would-have-them-do-unto-you. Who would disagree with this 'Golden Rule'? We regard it as the basis of an absolute and universal morality. And yet it is considered acceptable to kill the enemy in war; for a businessman to do the best for himself; for a lawyer to argue professionally for a position he would personally reject. Are the moral rules we live by more flexible than they seem at first sight? -/- In Bending the Rules Robert Hinde does not follow the much-trodden (...)
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  2. Robert A. Hinde (2007). Bending the Rules: Morality in the Modern World: From Relationships to Politics and War. Oxford University Press.
    Ethical principles and precepts -- The evolution of morality -- Ethics and law -- Exchange and reciprocity : conflict in personal relationships -- Ethics and the physical sciences -- Ethics and medicine -- Ethics and politics -- Ethics and business -- Ethics and war -- What does all this mean for the future? -- Appendix : relations to moral philosophy.
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  3. Robert A. Hinde (2005). A Selectionist Approach Integrates Moral Heuristics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):555-556.
    The nature and diversity of moral codes can be understood in terms of a few basic propensities honed by diachronic dialectics between what people do and what they are supposed to do in the culture in question. Many of the moral heuristics presented by Sunstein can be seen as by-products of these processes.
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  4. Robert A. Hinde (2002). Reinforcement Stretched Beyond its Limit. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):262-263.
    The concept of “intrinsic reinforcement” stretches the use of “reinforcement” beyond where it is valuable. The concept of the “self-system,” though fuzzy at the edges, can cover experience as well as the behaviour of altruistic acts.
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  5. Robert A. Hinde (2002). Why Good is Good: The Sources of Morality. Routledge.
    Where do our moral beliefs come from? Theologians and scientists provide often conflicting answers. Robert Hinde resolves these conflicts in offering a groundbreaking, multidisciplinary response, drawing on psychology, philosophy, evolutionary biology and social anthropology. Hinde argues that understanding the origins of our morality can clarify the debates surrounding contemporary ethical dilemmas such as genetic modification, increasing consumerism and globalization.
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  6. Robert A. Hinde (2001). Emotion: The Relation Between Breadth of Definition and Explanatory Power. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):37-38.
    Attempts to integrate diverse phenomena in terms of common processes are much needed in psychology, but definitional precision is a necessary preliminary to explanation. It is also preferable to use caution in juxtaposing concepts from different realms of discourse.
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  7. Robert A. Hinde (1984). Ethology has Progressed. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (3):391.
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  8. Robert A. Hinde (1981). Biological Approaches to the Study of Learning: Does Johnston Provide a New Alternative? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):146.
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  9. Robert A. Hinde & Saroj Datta (1981). Dominance: An Intervening Variable. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):442.
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