Search results for 'Robert A. Mechikoff' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert A. Mechikoff (2006). A History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World. Mcgraw-Hill.
    This engaging and informative text will hold the attention of students and scholars as they take a journey through time to understand the role that history and philosophy have played in shaping the course of sport and physical education in Western and selected non-Western civilizations. Using appropriate theoretical and interpretive frameworks, students will investigate topics such as the historical relationship between mind and body; what philosophers and intellectuals have said about the body as a source of knowledge; educational philosophy and (...)
     
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  2.  1
    Robert A. Larmer (2008). Miracles, Physicalism, and the Laws of Nature: ROBERT A. LARMER. Religious Studies 44 (2):149-159.
    In his paper ‘Miracles: metaphysics, physics, and physicalism’, 1 Kirk McDermid appears to have two primary goals. The first is to demonstrate that my account of how God might produce a miracle without violating any laws of nature is radically flawed. The second is to suggest two alternative accounts, one suitable for a deterministic world, one suitable for an indeterministic world, which allow for the occurrence of a miracle without violation of the laws of nature, yet do not suffer from (...)
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  3.  2
    Robert A. Oakes (1976). Religious Experience and Rational Certainty*: ROBERT A. OAKES. Religious Studies 12 (3):311-318.
    The purpose of this paper is to clear up the long-standing veritable mountain of misinterpretation, perpetuated from critic to critic, concerning the admittedly problematic concept of self-authenticating religious experience. While it may well be the case, as many have argued, that a sort of ‘experience’ about which one could not be mistaken is simply a logically impossible state of affairs, this cannot be known to be the case so long as what is under attack is a bogus concept, obviously absurd, (...)
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    Robert A. Larmer (2009). Interpreting Hume on Miracles: ROBERT A. LARMER. Religious Studies 45 (3):325-338.
    Contemporary commentators on Hume's essay, ‘Of miracles’ have increasingly tended to argue that Hume never intended to suggest that testimonial evidence must always be insufficient to justify belief in a miracle. This is in marked contrast to earlier commentators who interpreted Hume as intending to demonstrate that testimonial evidence is incapable in principle of ever establishing rational belief in a miracle. In this article I argue that this traditional interpretation is the correct one.
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    Robert A. Oakes (1980). Classical Theism and Pantheism: A Reply to Professor Quinn: ROBERT A. OAKES. Religious Studies 16 (3):353-356.
    I am grateful to Philip Quinn for his thorough and penetrating critique of my paper on classical theism and pantheism. He has given me much to think about, and it would be philosophically remiss of me not to acknowledge that – in the light of his remarks – the argument which I employed in defence of the thesis that classical theism implies a version of pantheism might well benefit from some amendment. However, the purpose of this brief counter-rejoinder is to (...)
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  6.  1
    Robert A. Oakes (1977). Classical Theism and Pantheism: A Victory for Process Theism?: ROBERT A. OAKES. Religious Studies 13 (2):167-173.
    In Anselm's Discovery , Professor Hartshorne makes the rather startling and counterintuitive claim that ‘…there is indeed no issue between theism and pantheism. We all exist in the divine being, as St Paul said.’ 1 Classical or orthodox theists, it seems eminently fair to say, can be expected to recoil from any such suggestion with more than a little indignation. First of all, it might well be objected that Hartshorne - as a ‘process theist’ - is not a classical theist, (...)
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  7.  1
    Robert A. Segal (1978). Eliade's Theory of Millenarianism: ROBERT A. SEGAL. Religious Studies 14 (2):159-173.
    To the extent that Mircea Eliade is concerned with millenarianism he is concerned with it as only an instance of religious phenomena generally and is concerned with its meaning rather than its cause. Yet presupposed in the meaning he finds is a theory of its cause, and that theory is worth examining both because it elucidates Eliade's approach to religion as a whole and because as an explanation of millenarianism it is atypical and even unique.
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  8.  1
    Robert A. Oakes (1972). Reply to Professor Rachels: ROBERT A. OAKES. Religious Studies 8 (2):165-167.
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  9. Clarence Wunderlin Jr (2012). The Image of the Entrepreneur and the Language of the Market: Robert A. Taft, Market Rhetoric, and Political Argument, 1933-1944. [REVIEW] Libertarian Papers 4.
    During his first decade on the national political stage , Robert A. Taft contributed to a lively “Old Right” conservative critique of the New Deal’s efforts to achieve economic recovery, promote sustainable growth, and convert to a postwar peacetime economy. This paper examines the senator’s market rhetoric—the ideas on the market, entrepreneurship, and the role of the state that he employed in political arguments after 1935—to understand the foundation of his libertarian brand of conservatism. The following article argues that (...)
     
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  10.  5
    Clarence Wunderlin Jr (2012). The Image of the Entrepreneur and the Language of the Market: Robert A. Taft, Market Rhetoric, and Political Argument, 1933-1944. [REVIEW] Libertarian Papers 4.
    During his first decade on the national political stage , Robert A. Taft contributed to a lively “Old Right” conservative critique of the New Deal’s efforts to achieve economic recovery, promote sustainable growth, and convert to a postwar peacetime economy. This paper examines the senator’s market rhetoric—the ideas on the market, entrepreneurship, and the role of the state that he employed in political arguments after 1935—to understand the foundation of his libertarian brand of conservatism. The following article argues that (...)
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  11. David Baldwin & Mark Haugaard (eds.) (2016). Robert A. Dahl: An Unended Quest. Routledge.
    This book is devoted to the work of Robert A. Dahl, who passed away in 2014. Dahl was one of the most important American political scientists and normative democratic theorists of the post-war era, and he was also an influential teacher who mentored some of the most significant academics of the next two generations of American political science. As an incredibly productive scholar he had a career that spanned more than half a century, his first book was published in (...)
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  12. John Orth Riedl & Robert A. Baker (1940). A Catalogue of Renaissance Philosophers, 1350-1650. Compiled by, Robert A. Baker [and Others]. Marquette University Press.
     
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  13. Robert A. Smith Iii (1974). 17 Our Passport to Evolutionary Awareness Robert A. Smith, III. In John Warren White (ed.), Frontiers of Consciousness: The Meeting Ground Between Inner and Outer Reality. Julian Press
     
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  14.  16
    Joelle M. Abi-Rached (2011). REVIEW: Robert A. Aronowitz. Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):79-82.
    “Breast cancer is all around us.” This is how Robert Aronowitz, a medical doctor, opens his timely Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. We are all familiar with the truism that “one in eight American women” will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. The pink ribbon has come to symbolize both solidarity and hope. Mammograms and “Self-Breast Examination” have become part of women’s daily routine, if not a spectre haunting their daily lives. Yet the (...)
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  15.  5
    Donald W. Light (2000). The Managed Care Blues and How to Cure Them, by Walter A. Zelman and Robert A. Berenson. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 1998. 240 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (1):138-141.
    In a new and important book entitled TheManagedCareBluesandHowtoCureThem, a lifetime consumer advocate and a surgeon who witnessed the excesses and unaccountable errors of his colleagues under fee for service explain with deft hands the promise of managed care, its problems, and solutions to them. Walter Zelman and Robert Berenson show empathy for the consumer backlash, provider resentment, and the patients' rights movement that has spawned a thousand bills to prevent possibly unethical actions. Yet they believe these efforts to regulate (...)
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  16.  26
    Russell Blackford (2012). Robots and Reality: A Reply to Robert Sparrow. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):41-51.
    We commonly identify something seriously defective in a human life that is lived in ignorance of important but unpalatable truths. At the same time, some degree of misapprehension of reality may be necessary for individual health and success. Morally speaking, it is unclear just how insistent we should be about seeking the truth. Robert Sparrow has considered such issues in discussing the manufacture and marketing of robot ‘pets’, such as Sony’s doglike ‘AIBO’ toy and whatever more advanced devices may (...)
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  17.  51
    Kevin Carnahan (2013). Religion, and Not Just Religious Reasons, in the Public Square: A Consideration of Robert Audi's and Nicholas Wolterstorff's Religion in the Public Square. Philosophia 41 (2):397-409.
    For the last several decades, philosophers have wrestled with the proper place of religion in liberal societies. Usually, the debates among these philosophers have started with the articulation of various conceptions of liberalism and then proceeded to locate religion in the context of these conceptions. In the process, however, too little attention has been paid to the way religion is conceived. Drawing on the work of Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff, two scholars who are often read as holding opposing (...)
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  18. Robert Mccauley (1986). Science as Cognitive Process: Toward an Empirical Philosophy of Science by Robert A. Rubinstein; Charles D. Laughlin,; John McManus. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 77:112-113.
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  19.  2
    A. K. Giri (2011). Sociology as a Quest for a Good Society: A Conversation with Robert Bellah. Journal of Human Values 17 (1):1-22.
    Quest for a good society has a long pedigree in sociological thought and critical reflections. It vibrates with many themes of liberation, morality and justice in classical sociology as pioneered by thinkers such as Marx and Durkheim and themes of decent society and creative society in recent theoretical discourses. The present essay discusses this quest for a good society in contemporary social sciences with a detailed discussion of the work of Robert N. Bellah, the pre-eminent sociologist of our times. (...)
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  20. Richard L. Moreland & Sascha Topolinski (2010). The Mere Exposure Phenomenon: A Lingering Melody by Robert Zajonc. Emotion Review 2 (4):329-339.
    The mere exposure phenomenon (repeated exposure to a stimulus is sufficient to improve attitudes toward that stimulus) is one of the most inspiring phenomena associated with Robert Zajonc’s long and productive career in social psychology. In the first part of this article, Richard Moreland (who was trained by Zajonc in graduate school) describes his own work on exposure and learning, and on the relationships among familiarity, similarity, and attraction in person perception. In the second part, Sascha Topolinski (a recent (...)
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  21.  5
    Robert A. Preston (1967). "Theories of Knowledge: A Critical Introduction," by Robert Ackermann. Modern Schoolman 44 (2):197-198.
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  22. G. William Barnard (2005). Pt. 3. James and Mysticism. For an Engaged Reading : William James and the Varieties of Postmodern Religious Experience / Grace M. Jantzen ; Asian Religions and Mysticism : The Legacy of William James in the Study of Religions / Richard King ; James and Freud on Mysticism / Robert A. Segal ; Mystical Assessments : Jamesian Reflections on Spiritual Judgments. [REVIEW] In Jeremy R. Carrette (ed.), William James and the Varieties of Religious Experience: A Centenary Celebration. Routledge
  23.  7
    Morgan Luck (2014). Robert A. Larmer, The Legitimacy of Miracles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (2):235-240.
    This is a good book. It is good because: (a) it outlines well the central arguments of the debate (that is, the arguments relating to what a miracle is, whether they are possible, whether we can have evidence of their occurrence, and what would follow from such evidence were we to have it); (b) it furthers the debate; and (c) it is a clearly written. If you are a philosopher religion whose research area is miracles, the book is a must-read. (...)
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  24.  6
    Gilbert A. Davies (1931). Translations From the Greek Anthology. By Robert A. Furness. Pp. 239. London: Jonathan Cape, 1931. 10s. 6d. The Classical Review 45 (05):202-.
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  25.  1
    Peter Taylor (1993). Pioneer Ecologist: The Life and Work of Victor Ernest Shelford, 1877-1968 by Robert A. Croker; Foundations of Ecology: Classic Papers with Commentaries by Leslie A. Real; James H. Brown. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 84:177-179.
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  26. Charles A. Baylis (1958). McNaughton Robert. A Metrical Concept of Happiness. English, with Brief Spanish Abstract. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 14 No. 2 , Pp. 172–183. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 23 (3):351-352.
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  27. Richard Burkhardt Jr (1984). Ethology: Its Nature and Relations with Other Sciences by Robert A. Hinde. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 75:219-220.
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  28. Robert H. Kargon (1977). The Conservative Mode: Robert A. Millikan and the Twentieth-Century Revolution in Physics. Isis 68 (4):509-526.
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  29. E. A. Meyer (1990). Guardians of Language: The Grammarian and Society in Late Antiquity.Robert A. Kaster. Speculum 65 (4):1002-1005.
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  30. A. G. Rigg (1969). De Archana Deorum [sic]Thomae Walsingham Robert A. van Kluyve. Speculum 44 (3):501-504.
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  31. George Sarton (1930). Science and the New Civilization by Robert A. Millikan; Humanism and America by Norman Foerster. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 14:446-449.
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  32. Alan Shapiro (2001). A History Of Color: The Evolution Of Theories Of Lights And Color By Robert A. Crone. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:145-145.
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  33. Richard A. Shweder (1999). Encomium for Robert A. LeVine. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 27 (2):235-244.
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  34. Richard A. Shweder (1999). Encomium for Robert A. LeVine. Ethos 27 (2):235-244.
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  35.  4
    Giovanni Gellera (2013). The Philosophy of Robert Forbes: A Scottish Scholastic Response to Cartesianism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (2):191-211.
    In the second half of the seventeenth century, philosophy teaching in the Scottish universities gradually moved from scholasticism to Cartesianism. Robert Forbes, regent at Marischal College and King's College, Aberdeen, was a strenuous opponent of Descartes. The analysis of the philosophy of Forbes and of his teacher Patrick Gordon sheds light on the relationship between Scottish Reformed scholasticism and the reception of Descartes in Scotland.
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  36.  9
    Andrew Ali Aghapour (2014). Defining “Religion” as Natural: A Critical Invitation to Robert McCauley. Zygon 49 (3):708-715.
    Previous critics have argued that Robert McCauley defines religion and science selectively and arbitrarily, cutting them to fit his model in Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not. McCauley has responded that final definitions are “overrated” and that artificial distinctions can serve an important role in naturalistic investigation. I agree with this position but argue that a genealogy of the category of religion is crucial to the methodology that McCauley describes. Since the inherent ambiguity of religion will undermine (...)
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  37.  8
    Carlos J. Moya (forthcoming). Frankfurtian Reflections: A Critical Discussion of Robert Lockie’s “Three Recent Frankfurt Cases”. Philosophia:1-21.
    In a recent article, Robert Lockie brings about a critical examination of three Frankfurtstyle cases designed by David Widerker and Derk Pereboom. His conclusion is that these cases do not refute either the Principle of Alternative Possibilities or some cognate leeway principle for moral responsibility. Though I take the conclusion to be true, I contend that Lockie's arguments do not succeed in showing it. I concentrate on Pereboom's Tax Evasion 2. After presenting Pereboom's example and analyzing its structure, I (...)
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  38.  22
    Gert Goeminne (2013). Who is Afraid of the Political? A Response to Robert Scharff and Michel Puech. Foundations of Science 18 (2):355-360.
    In their respective commentaries to my article “Postphenomenology and the Politics of Sustainable Technology” both Robert Scharff and Michel Puech take issue with my postphenomenological inroad into the politics of technology. In a first step I try to accommodate the suggestions and objections raised by Scharff by making my account of the political more explicit. Consequently, I argue how an antagonistic relational conceptualisation of the political allows me to address head on Puech’s plea to leave politics behind and move (...)
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  39.  12
    Dean Moyar (2012). How the Good Obligates in Hegel's Conception ofSittlichkeit: A Response to Robert Stern'sUnderstanding Moral Obligation. Inquiry 55 (6):584-605.
    Abstract In Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Robert Stern argues that Hegel has a social command view of obligation. On this view, there is an element of social command or social sanction that must be added to a judgment of the good in order to bring about an obligation. I argue to the contrary that Hegel's conception of conscience, and thus the individual's role in obligation, is more central to his account than the social dimension. While agreeing with (...)
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  40. Mark Walker & Milan Cirkovic, Anthropic Reasoning and the Contemporary Design Argument in Astrophysics: A Reply to Robert Klee.
    In a recent study of astrophysical “fine-tunings” (or “coincidences”), Robert Klee critically assesses the support that such astrophysical evidence might be thought to lend to the design argument (i.e., the argument that our universe has been designed by some deity). Klee argues that a proper assessment indicates that the universe is not as “fine-tuned” as advertised by proponents of the design arguments. We argue (i) that Klee’s assessment of the data is, to a certain extent, problematic; and (ii) even (...)
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  41.  26
    Donald Musser (2008). “A Response To The Papers of Robert John Russell, Durwood Foster and Richard Gelwick”. Tradition and Discovery 35 (3):48-50.
    This essay is a brief response to Durwood Foster and Richard Gelwick’s essays analyzing the 1963 encounter of Paul Tillich and Michael Polanyi and to Robert Russell’s assessment of the importantce of Polanyi’s ideas for recent theology and science discussions.
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  42.  12
    John Haught (2012). Robert Ulanowicz and the Possibility of a Theology of Evolution. Axiomathes 22 (2):261-268.
    In A Third Window Robert Ulanowicz exposes the explanatory weaknesses of both classical and statistical methods in scientific inquiry. His book, however, does much more than that. While being completely grounded in empirical science, it also outlines a worldview, or a metaphysics, that renders intelligible the fact of chance and emergent novelty. Ulanowicz establishes his position by comparing his third window onto nature with two others conventional scientific approaches. The purpose of this essay is to point out the value (...)
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  43.  5
    Christoph Gradmann (2004). A Harmony of Illusions: Clinical and Experimental Testing of Robert Koch's Tuberculin 1890–1900. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (3):465-481.
    One of Ludwik Fleck’s ideas about the development of scientific knowledge is that—once a system of interpretation is in place—the process that follows can be characterised as one of inertia: any new evidence comes under a strong pressure to be incorporated into the established frame. This can result in what Fleck called a harmony of illusions when contradictory evidence becomes almost invisible or is incorporated into the established frame only by huge efforts.The paper analyses early explanations of the tuberculin reaction (...)
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  44.  1
    Michael Hunter (2007). Robert Boyle and the Early Royal Society: A Reciprocal Exchange in the Making of Baconian Science. British Journal for the History of Science 40 (1):1-23.
    This paper documents an important development in Robert Boyle's natural-philosophical method – his use from the 1660s onwards of ‘heads’ and ‘inquiries’ as a means of organizing his data, setting himself an agenda when studying a subject and soliciting information from others. Boyle acknowledged that he derived this approach from Francis Bacon, but he had not previously used it in his work, and the reason why it came to the fore when it did is not apparent from his printed (...)
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  45.  7
    Christian Polke (2015). Ultimates, The Ultimate, and the Quest of a Personal God: On Robert C. Neville's Philosophical Theology. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 36 (2):154-167.
    On his website, Robert Cummings Neville makes an interesting remark: My serious intellectual life began in 1944 at the age of five when a kindergarten classmate told me that God is a person. I checked with my father about this, and he said, “No, Jesus was a person but God is more like electricity or light.” This seemed reasonable and triggered in me a decisive love of God. Electricity makes things go, like my electric train, and my father explained (...)
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  46.  24
    Alexander Nehamas (2014). Nietzsche, Drives, Selves, and Leonard Bernstein: A Reply to Christopher Janaway and Robert Pippin. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):134-146.
    Ours is a discipline in which agreement is often a form of discourtesy, and so I must thank Christopher Janaway and Robert Pippin for doing me the courtesy of disagreeing with several issues in my book, most of which I will not be able to discuss here. Both are kind and generous friends, which is why they both begin by saying some very nice things about Nietzsche: Life as Literature.1 Or are they? Yes, they are, but that is not (...)
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  47.  14
    John Haldane & Patrick Lee (2003). Rational Souls and the Beginning of Life (A Reply to Robert Pasnau). Philosophy 78 (306):532 - 540.
    The present essay takes up matters discussed by Robert Pasnau in his response to our previous criticism of his account of Aquinas's view of when a foetus acquires a human soul. We are mainly concerned with metaphysical and biological issues and argue that the kind of organization required for ensoulment is that sufficient for the full development of a human being, and that this is present from conception. We contend that in his criticisms of our account Pasnau fails clearly (...)
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  48.  1
    June Barrow-Green (2010). 'A Corrective to the Spirit of Too Exclusively Pure Mathematics': Robert Smith (1689-1768) and His Prizes at Cambridge University. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 56 (3):271-316.
    (1999). 'A Corrective to the Spirit of too Exclusively Pure Mathematics': Robert Smith (1689-1768) and his Prizes at Cambridge University. Annals of Science: Vol. 56, No. 3, pp. 271-316.
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  49.  11
    Donald N. McCloskey (1985). The Problem of Audience in Historical Economics: Rhetorical Thoughts on a Text by Robert Fogel. History and Theory 24 (1):1-22.
    Both history and economics have rhetorics which limit their practitioners as to what sorts of evidence and what sorts of logical appeals they can make if they wish to retain an audience. The thesis of Robert Fogel's Railroads and Economic Growth could be summed up by a three-line proof, but Fogel used courtroom procedure, scientific jargon, statistics, simulation, and the traditions of economic and historical argument to persuade an audience of both historians and economists. It was a book about (...)
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  50.  23
    Noel Malcolm (2004). Robert Boyle, Georges Pierre des Clozets, and the Asterism: A New Source. Early Science and Medicine 9 (4):293-306.
    In 1677-8 Robert Boyle fell victim to a French confidence trickster, Georges Pierre des Clozets, who claimed to belong to a secret society of alchemists, 'the Asterism'; the leader of the Asterism was described as the 'Patriarch of Antioch', resident in Constantinople. New evidence shows that Georges Pierre had contrived to publish two short articles about this 'Patriarch' in a Dutch newspaper, and that one of these was given to Boyle to corroborate Pierre's claims. These articles provide further information (...)
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