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Profile: Robert Phillips (University of Connecticut, Southwestern Baptist Seminary)
  1. Shawn L. Berman & Robert A. Phillips (forthcoming). Special Issue on" The Accountable Corporation": Guest Editors' Introduction. Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
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  2. Heather Elms, Stephen Brammer, Jared D. Harris & Robert A. Phillips (2010). Business Ethis Quarterly Twentieth Anniversary Forum, Part I: New Directions for Business New Directions in Strategic Management and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):401.
     
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  3. Heather Elms, Stephen Brammer, Jared D. Harris & Robert A. Phillips (2010). New Directions in Strategic Management and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):401-425.
    This essay attempts to provide a useful research agenda for researchers in both strategic management and business ethics. We motivate this agenda by suggesting that the two fields started with similar interests, diverged, and are beginning to converge again. We then identify several streams that hold particular promise for developing our understanding of the relationship between strategy and ethics: stakeholder theory, managerial discretion, behavioral strategy, strategy as practice, and environmental sustainability.
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  4. Robert A. Phillips (2010). Ethics and Network Organizations. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):533-543.
    As value chains become longer with increases in outsourcing and subcontracting, the challenges of fi xing responsibility become more diffi cult. Using concepts from the literature on social networks, this paper considers issues of diffusion of responsibility and plausible deniability in such relationships. Specifi cally, this paper isolates three sources of denial of – or defense against – attributions of responsibility: connection, control and knowledge. It goes on to consider the effects on network density and actor centrality as third parties (...)
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  5. Robert A. Phillips (2010). New Directions in Strategic Management and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):401-425.
    This essay attempts to provide a useful research agenda for researchers in both strategic management and business ethics. We motivate this agenda by suggesting that the two fields started with similar interests, diverged, and are beginning to converge again. We then identify several streams that hold particular promise for developing our understanding of the relationship between strategy and ethics: stakeholder theory, managerial discretion, behavioral strategy, strategy as practice, and environmental sustainability.
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  6. Robert A. Phillips (2010). 2009 Sbe Presidential Address New Directions in Strategic Management and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):533.
     
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  7. Robert A. Phillips (2009). Private Security Companies and Institutional Legitimacy. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):403-432.
    The private provision of security services has attracted a great deal of recent attention, both professional and popular. Much of that attention suggests the questioned moral legitimacy of the private vs. public provision of security. Linking the literature on moral legitimacy and responsibility from new institutional and stakeholder theories, we examine the relationship between moral legitimacy and responsible behavior by both private security companies (PSCs) and their stakeholders. We ask what the moral-legitimacy-enhancing responsibilities of both might be, and contribute to (...)
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  8. Robert A. Phillips & Michael E. Johnson-Cramer (2006). Ties That Unwind: Dynamism in Integrative Social Contracts Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):283 - 302.
    Social contract theory offers a powerful method and metaphor for the study of organizational ethics. This paper considers the variant of the social contract that has arguably gained the most attention among business ethicists: integrative social contracts theory or ISCT [Donaldson and Dunfee: 1999, Ties That Bind (Harvard Business School Press, Boston)]. A core precept of ISCT - that consent to membership in an organization entails obligations to follow the norms of that organization, subject to the moral minimums of basic (...)
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  9. Robert A. Phillips (2004). Brief Remarks on the Evolutionary Method. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2004:235-238.
    There are explicit claims to Darwinian thinking in numerous fields of study. A common temptation associated with this method across disciplines is to call some attributes “natural” and others “cultural” in origin. But this distinction can be dangerous—particularly when applied to ethics. When employing the Darwinian method, ideas should be evaluated in the same way whether the characteristics are described as natural or as cultural. We should ascertain the moral usefulness of a trait irrespective of its genetic basis or lack (...)
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  10. R. Edward Freeman & Robert A. Phillips (2002). Stakeholder Theory: A Libertarian Defense. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (3):331-350.
    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to suggest that at least one strain of what has come to be called “stakeholder theory” has roots that are deeply libertarian. We begin by explicating both “stakeholder theory” and “libertarian arguments.” We show how there are libertarian arguments for both instrumental and normative stakeholder theory, and we construct a version of capitalism, called “stakeholder capitalism,” that builds on these libertarian ideas. We argue throughout that strong notions of “freedom” and “voluntary action” are (...)
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  11. Robert A. Phillips & Joel Reichart (2000). The Environment as a Stakeholder? A Fairness-Based Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):185 - 197.
    Stakeholder theory is often unable to distinguish those individuals and groups that are stakeholders from those that are not. This problem of stakeholder identity has recently been addressed by linking stakeholder theory to a Rawlsian principle of fairness. To illustrate, the question of stakeholder status for the non-human environment is discussed. This essay criticizes a past attempt to ascribe stakeholder status to the non-human environment, which utilized a broad definition of the term "stakeholder." This paper then demonstrates how, despite the (...)
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  12. Robert A. Phillips & James G. Clawson (1998). Current Events Periodicals and Business Ethics. Teaching Business Ethics 2 (2):165-174.
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  13. Robert A. Phillips (1997). Stakeholder Theory and A Principle of Fairness. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (1):51-66.
    Stakeholder theory has become a central issue in the literature on business ethics / business and society. There are, however, a number of problems with stakeholder theory as currently understood. Among these are: 1) the lack of a coherent justificatory framework, 2) the problem of adjudicating between stakeholders, and 3) the problem of stakeholder identification. In this essay, I propose that a possible source of obligations to stakeholders is the principle of fairness (or fair play) as discussed in the political (...)
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