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Robert A. Segal [20]Robert Alan Segal [1]
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Profile: Robert Segal
  1. Robert A. Segal (2004). The Place of Religion in Modernity. History of the Human Sciences 17 (4):131-149.
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  2.  10
    Robert A. Segal (2015). The Modern Study of Myth and its Relation to Science. Zygon 50 (3):757-771.
    The history of the modern study of myth can be divided into two main categories: that which sees myth as the primitive counterpart to natural science, itself considered overwhelmingly modern, and that which sees myth as almost anything but the primitive counterpart to natural science. The first category constitutes the nineteenth-century approach to myth. The second category constitutes the twentieth-century approach. Tylor and Frazer epitomize the nineteenth-century view. Malinowski, Eliade, Bultmann, Jonas, Camus, Freud, and Jung epitomize the twentieth-century approach. The (...)
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  3.  9
    Robert A. Segal (1990). Misconceptions of the Social Sciences. Zygon 25 (3):263-278.
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  4.  8
    Robert A. Segal (1992). Religionists'misconceptions: Replies to Sharma and Pals. Zygon 27 (1):107-111.
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  5.  35
    Robert A. Segal (2011). What is “Mythic Reality”? Zygon 46 (3):588-592.
    Abstract. The topic of the March 2011 symposium in Zygon is “The Mythic Reality of the Autonomous Individual.” Yet few of the contributors even discuss “mythic reality.” Of the ones who do, most cavalierly use “myth” dismissively, as simply a false belief. Rather than reconciling myth with reality, they oppose myth to reality. Their view of myth is by no means unfamiliar or unwarranted, but they need to recognize other views of myth and to defend their own. Above all, they (...)
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  6.  15
    Robert A. Segal (1983). Victor Turners Theory of Ritual. Zygon 18 (3):327-335.
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  7.  4
    Robert A. Segal (1981). Donald Capps, Walter H. Capps and M. Gerald Bradford . Encounter with Erikson: Historical Interpretation and Religious Biography. Pp. Xvi + 429. $9.00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 17 (1):121.
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  8.  7
    Robert A. Segal (1985). A Jungian View of Evil. Zygon 20 (1):83-89.
    . On the one hand Jungian John Sanford criticizes Carl Jung for underestimating the importance granted evil by at least some strains of Christianity. On the other hand Sanford follows Jung in assuming that psychology is entitled to criticize Christianity whenever it fails to grant evil its due. Like Jung, Sanford contends that he is faulting Christianity on only psychological grounds: for failing to cope with evil in man–the shadow archetype. In fact, Sanford, like perhaps Jung as well, is also (...)
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  9.  9
    Robert A. Segal (1985). Anthropological Definitions of Religion. Zygon 20 (1):78-79.
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  10.  3
    Robert A. Segal (2003). Psychoanalyzing Myth: From Freud to Winnicott. In Diane E. Jonte-Pace (ed.), Teaching Freud. Oxford University Press 137--162.
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  11.  1
    Robert A. Segal (1978). Eliade's Theory of Millenarianism: ROBERT A. SEGAL. Religious Studies 14 (2):159-173.
    To the extent that Mircea Eliade is concerned with millenarianism he is concerned with it as only an instance of religious phenomena generally and is concerned with its meaning rather than its cause. Yet presupposed in the meaning he finds is a theory of its cause, and that theory is worth examining both because it elucidates Eliade's approach to religion as a whole and because as an explanation of millenarianism it is atypical and even unique.
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  12.  3
    Robert A. Segal (1978). Eliade's Theory of Millenarianism. Religious Studies 14 (2):159 - 173.
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  13.  2
    Robert A. Segal, Myth.
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    Robert A. Segal, Myth : Theoretical Approaches.
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  15. Robert A. Segal (2006). Contributions From Religious Studies. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford
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  16. Robert A. Segal (ed.) (1998). Jung on Mythology. Routledge.
    At least three major questions can be asked of myth: what is its subject matter? What is its origin? What is its function? Theories of myth may differ in the answers they give to any of these questions, but more basically they may also differ on which of the questions they ask. C.G. Jung's theory is one of the few that purports to answer fully all three questions. This volume collects and organizes the key passages on myth by Jung himself (...)
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  17. Robert A. Segal (2002). 1 Myth as Primitive Philosophy. In Kevin Schilbrack (ed.), Thinking Through Myths: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge 18.
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  18. Robert A. Segal (2006). Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford Univ Pr.
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  19. Robert Alan Segal (ed.) (1996). Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Myth. Garland Pub..
     
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  20. Robert A. Segal (1996). The Jung Cult: Origins of a Charismatic MovementRichard Noll. Isis 87 (1):199-199.
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  21. William Robertson Smith & Robert A. Segal (2004). Religion of the Semites. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 194 (1):86-86.
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