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Robert Cummings Neville [79]Robert C. Neville [48]
  1.  11
    Robert C. Neville (2000). Boston Confucianism: Portable Tradition in the Late-Modern World. State University of New York Press.
    Promoting multiculturalism through renewed East-West and Confucian-Christian dialogue, Neville (philosophy, religion, and theology, Boston U.) fosters the idea ...
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  2. Robert Cummings Neville (2011). John E. Smith: Doing Something with American Philosophy. The Pluralist 6 (3):117-126.
    The philosophy of John Smith is not a dispassionate subject for me. He was my teacher from my sophomore year in college through the PhD, which he mentored. I worked in his office nearly every day during that time. He became my intellectual father and framed the way I took up philosophy. He performed my wedding and twenty-five years later taught my two daughters. We worked together philosophically and in the politics of the academy from my first day as his (...)
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  3.  16
    Robert C. Neville (1989). Value, Courage, and Leadership. Review of Metaphysics 43 (1):3 - 26.
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  4. Robert Cummings Neville (1995). Normative Cultures. State University of New York Press.
    This is a philosophic study of theory and practical reason focusing on social obligation and personal responsibility. It draws on Chinese as well as Western Traditions of philosophy.
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  5.  1
    Robert Cummings Neville (1989). Recovery of the Measure: Interpretation and Nature. State University of New York Press.
    The author constructs a philosophy of nature dealing with being, identity, value, space, time, motion, and causality, and uses that as a basis for a theory of hermeneutics to address contemporary problems of interpretation.
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  6.  10
    Robert C. Neville (1969). Neoclassical Metaphysics and Christianity. International Philosophical Quarterly 9 (4):605-624.
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  7. Robert Cummings Neville (1992). The Highroad Around Modernism. State University of New York Press.
    From the standpoint that both modernism and postmodernism look like nothing more than two late modern movements, too preoccupied with themselves and their historical place to engage a swiftly changing world containing more than the Western ...
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  8. Robert C. Neville (2002). Religion in Late Modernity. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  9.  2
    Robert Cummings Neville (1995). The Cosmology of Freedom. State University of New York Press.
    The book shows the connections between the personal and the social dimensions of freedom, and how all the meanings of freedom are functions of the natural cosmos.
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  10. Robert C. Neville (1988). Plurality and Ambiguity Hermeneutics, Religion , Hope. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  11.  20
    Robert Cummings Neville (2010). New Projects in Chinese Philosophy. The Pluralist 5 (2):45-56.
    The general thesis of this article is that contemporary Chinese philosophy needs to be more creative than it is.1 It proposes eight new projects for Chinese philosophy to undertake that involve creativity. But first it asks what the term "Chinese philosophy" means in the current philosophical context.To some people, it means the tradition of philosophy in China from the ancient world of the Zhou texts, the Confucians, Daoists, and other schools, through its development up to the point where Western intellectual (...)
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  12.  8
    Robert C. Neville (1986). A Thesis Concerning Truth. Process Studies 15 (2):127-136.
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  13. Robert C. Neville (2001). The Human Condition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  14. Robert C. Neville (2001). Ultimate Realities. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  15.  8
    Robert Cummings Neville (2003). Response to Bryan W. Van Norden's Review of "Boston Confucianism". [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 53 (3):417-420.
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  16.  2
    Robert Cummings Neville (2015). The Cosmology of Joseph Grange: Nature, The City, Soul. Philosophy East and West 65 (3):663-676.
    The late Joseph Grange is perhaps the most sharply focused and elegantly lucid of the group of North American philosophers to build new aesthetic metaphysical visions from the legacies of process philosophy and pragmatism. His peers include, among others, George Allan,1 Roger Ames,2 Chung-ying Cheng,3 Robert Corrington,4 Frederick Ferre,5 Warren Frisina,6 David L. Hall,7 Judith Jones,8 Elizabeth Kraus,9 Hugh P. McDonald,10 Steve Odin,11 Sandra Rosenthal,12 Robert Smid,13 David Weissman,14 and myself, along with our many students and colleagues. This group has (...)
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  17.  8
    Robert C. Neville (1967). Socratic Ignorance. International Philosophical Quarterly 7 (2):340-356.
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  18.  10
    Robert Cummings Neville (2001). Two Forms of Comparative Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):1-13.
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  19.  5
    Robert Cummings Neville (1999). Knowing and Value. Process Studies 28 (3/4):356-358.
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  20.  6
    Robert Cummings Neville (1994). Confucianism as a World Philosophy Presidential Address for the 8th International Conference on Chinese Philosophy, Beijing, 1993. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 21 (1):5-25.
  21.  4
    Robert Cummings Neville (2011). Sagehood. Review of Metaphysics 64 (3):623-625.
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  22.  4
    Robert C. Neville (1998). Lewis S. Ford's Theology. Process Studies 27 (1/2):18-33.
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  23.  9
    Robert Cummings Neville (1999). Eternity and the Time of Education. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:237-243.
    Part of the recent neglect of eternity comes from a poor definition of it as static abstraction, as mere form, or even robust form that is not so mere. This, of course, could not be what the ancients such as Origin or Plotinus must have meant when they claimed that God is eternal, and thus more real than things that change. Therefore, my first task here is to develop a contemporary theory of eternity that is worth being an orientation point (...)
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  24. Robert Cummings Neville (1981). Reconstruction of Thinking. State University of New York Press.
    The Renaissance development of science fulfilled the ancient ideal of integrating quantitative and qualitative thinking, but failed to recognize valuational thinking and thus deprived moral, aesthetic, and political thought of cognitive status. The task of this book is to reconstruct the concept of thinking in order to exhibit valuation, not reason, as the foundation for thinking and to integrate valuational with quantitative and qualitative modes. Part I explains the broad thesis, interpreting the problem of the foundations for thinking and providing (...)
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  25.  8
    Robert Cummings Neville (2001). Humanity and the Natural World. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:259-264.
    A key existential problem for paideia in the modern Western world—and perhaps for much elsewhere—is to build up the continuum of engagement from the subtle signs of contemporary scientific, artistic, and imaginative society down through the depths of nature. That continuum has been prevented by the modern creation of a fake culture of artificial self-sufficiency within which nature appears only tamed and cooked, and which deflects interpretive engagements of deeper nature except where leakages occur. What can be done about (...)
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  26.  3
    Robert Cummings Neville (2003). Metaphysics in Contemporary Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):313-326.
  27.  7
    Robert Cummings Neville (1994). Nature and Spirit. International Philosophical Quarterly 34 (4):504-505.
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  28.  6
    Robert Cummings Neville (2014). Shen, Vincent, Ed., Dao Companion to Classical Confucian Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):445-449.
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  29. Robert C. Neville (1968). God the Creator; on the Transcendence and Presence of God. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.
     
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  30.  9
    Robert Cummings Neville (2013). Naturalism: So Easily Wrong. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (3):199-213.
    One of the things right about naturalism as an ideology is its rejection of authoritarianism and its insistence on experiential inquiry. One of the things often wrong with some naturalist positions is their insistence that only natural science constitutes valid inquiry. Another of the things right about naturalism is its rejection of literal supernaturalism as having explanatory or hermeneutical power. And yet, one of the things often wrong with some naturalist positions is tone-deafness with respect to the symbolic power of (...)
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  31.  7
    Robert C. Neville (2001). Dimensions of the Sacred: An Anatomy of the World's Beliefs (Review). Philosophy East and West 51 (3):420-425.
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  32.  13
    Robert C. Neville (1983). The Unity of Knowledge and Action. Review of Metaphysics 36 (3):703-706.
  33.  15
    Robert C. Neville (2012). Recent Books on Neo-Confucian Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (2):167-180.
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  34.  2
    Robert Cummings Neville (1997). Commentary on the AAS Panel: Shun, Bloom, Cheng, and Birdwhistell. Philosophy East and West 47 (1):67-74.
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  35. Robert Cummings Neville (1987). The Puritan Smile: A Look Toward Moral Reflection. State University of New York Press.
    This book develops a contemporary metaphysics of morals.
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  36.  5
    Robert Cummings Neville (2005). Comments on "Nature's Religion" and Robert Corrington's "Aesthetic Naturalism". American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 26 (3):254 - 262.
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  37.  3
    Robert Cummings Neville (2013). Chinese Philosophy in Systematic Metaphysics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (S1):59-75.
    The chief problematic for contemporary systematic metaphysics is to develop categories for understanding the world as having value at the same time that it is explicable by science. Western philosophical thinking, with major exceptions, has tracked science by understanding the world to be factual but not intrinsically valuable. Chinese philosophy in all periods has understood human beings to be embedded within society which in turn is embedded within nature, all of which bear values of appropriate types. Themes in Chinese philosophy (...)
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  38.  5
    Robert Cummings Neville (1995). Truth's Debt to Value. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 69 (1):116-119.
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  39.  9
    Robert C. Neville (1972). Plato. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (1):142-145.
  40.  4
    Robert Cummings Neville (2014). Self-Reliance and the Portability of Pragmatism. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 35 (2):93-107.
    Flush with the juices of adolescence, American philosophy declared independence from its European parentage in the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson and his generation. In 1837, Emerson addressed the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa Society on the occasion of its inaugural meeting for the year, which he called a “holiday.” Emerson began: I greet you on the recommencement of our literary year. Our anniversary is one of hope, and, perhaps, not enough of labor. We do not meet for games of strength (...)
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  41.  12
    Robert C. Neville (1967). Intuition. International Philosophical Quarterly 7 (4):556-590.
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  42.  8
    Robert C. Neville (1986). Comments on Girardot's Response. Philosophy East and West 36 (3):271-273.
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  43. Robert Cummings Neville (1993). A Theology Primer. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 14 (3):317-326.
     
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  44.  12
    Robert Cummings Neville (2007). Special Topic: Creativity in Christianity and Confucianism. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (2):125-130.
    In order respectfully and adequately to compare Confucian and Christian conceptions of creativity, it is necessary to have proper comparative categories. Put roughly, we need to know what creativity is in order to see how Confucianism and Christianity have various versions of it. In respect of what do they agree or differ? So the first order of business is to put forward, however briefly, a theory of creativity in light of which comparisons can be made. Creativity, of course, is a (...)
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  45.  1
    Robert C. Neville (1968). John E. Smith. Religion and Empiricism. The Aquinas Lecture. Pp. 68. Religious Studies 4 (1):161.
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  46.  7
    Robert C. Neville (1987). God, Guilt and Death. Faith and Philosophy 4 (2):221-224.
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  47.  7
    Robert Cummings Neville (2012). Dimensions of Contemporary Confucian Cosmopolitanism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):594-613.
    This paper identifies five dimensions of cosmopolitanism, though doubtless there are many more: cosmopolitanism in decision making, engaging others, attaining personal wholeness, the ultimate value-identity of life, and religious sensibility. These are discussed in terms of the Confucian ideas of the “Four Beginnings,” ritual, life as cultivated education, sagehood, public versus private life, Principle, heart-mind, harmony, value, humaneness, “love with differences,” “roots and branches,” and filiality, among others. In all, it presents Confucianism as a living tradition that is facing up (...)
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  48.  6
    Robert C. Neville (1984). New Metaphysics for Eternal Experience: Critical Review of Steve Odin's Process Metaphysics and Hua-Yen Buddhism: A Critical Study of Cumulative Penetration Vs. Interpenetration. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (2):185-197.
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  49.  10
    Robert C. Neville (1985). Wang Yang‐Ming and John Dewey on the Ontological Question. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (3):283-295.
  50.  8
    Robert C. Neville (2008). A Letter of Grateful and Affectionate Response to David Ray Griffin's Whitehead's Radically Different Postmodern Philosophy. Process Studies 37 (1):7-38.
    David R. Griffin’s new Whitehead’s Radically Different Postmodern Philosophy: An Argument for Its Contemporary Relevance (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2007) contains a chapterlong Whiteheadian response to several criticisms I have leveled against process theology. While encouraging his attempt to promote Whitehead as a preferred alternative to foundationalist modernism and postmodernism, I undertake to rebut Griffin’s arguments through discussions of the following topics: the one and the many (which Whitehead does not treat adequately), the finite versus infinite (...)
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