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  1. Atul Gawande, Deborah W. Denno, Robert D. Truog & David Waisel, Physicians and Execution: Highlights From a Discussion of Lethal Injection.
    This article constitutes excerpts of a videotaped discussion hosted by the New England Journal of Medicine on January 14, 2008, concerning a range of topics on lethal injection prompted by the United States Supreme Court's January 7 oral arguments in Baze v. Rees. Dr. Atul Gawande moderated the roundtable that included two anesthesiologists - Dr. Robert Truog and Dr. David Waisel - as well as law professor Deborah Denno. The discussion focused on the drugs used in lethal injection executions, whether (...)
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  2. Eric L. Krakauer & Robert D. Truog (forthcoming). Case Study: Mistrust, Racism, and End-of-Life Treatment. Hastings Center Report.
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  3. Robert D. Truog & Franklin G. Miller (2014). Changing the Conversation About Brain Death. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):9-14.
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  4. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2012). Going All the Way: Ethical Clarity and Ethical Progress. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):10-11.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 10-11, June 2012.
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  5. Robert D. Truog (2012). When Does a Nudge Become a Shove in Seeking Consent for Organ Donation? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):42-44.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 42-44, February 2012.
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  6. Robert D. Truog & Franklin G. Miller (2012). Brain Death: Justifications and Critiques. Clinical Ethics 7 (3):128-132.
    Controversies about the diagnosis and meaning of brain death have existed as long as the concept itself. Here we review the historical development of brain death, and then evaluate the various attempts to justify the claim that patients who are diagnosed as brain dead can be considered dead for all legal and social purposes, and especially with regard to procuring their vital organs for transplantation. While we agree with most commentators that death should be defined as the loss of integration (...)
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  7. Robert D. Truog (2011). Are There Some Things Doctors Just Shouldn't Do? Hastings Center Report 41 (3):3-3.
    It is hard to imagine two precepts that enjoy more uniform support among the international medical community than the ethical prohibitions against physician participation in capital punishment and torture. Yet the two articles in this issue of the Hastings Center Report challenge these sacred assumptions, arguing that the ethics of these issues are more complicated than they may seem, and that each deserves more nuanced consideration than it has received in the past.I have personally written in opposition to the participation (...)
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  8. Robert D. Truog & Sadath A. Sayeed (2011). Neonatal Decision-Making: Beyond the Standard of Best Interests. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):44 - 45.
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  9. Franklin G. Miller, Robert D. Truog & Dan W. Brock (2010). Moral Fictions and Medical Ethics. Bioethics 24 (9):453-460.
    Conventional medical ethics and the law draw a bright line distinguishing the permitted practice of withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from the forbidden practice of active euthanasia by means of a lethal injection. When clinicians justifiably withdraw life-sustaining treatment, they allow patients to die but do not cause, intend, or have moral responsibility for, the patient's death. In contrast, physicians unjustifiably kill patients whenever they intentionally administer a lethal dose of medication. We argue that the differential moral assessment of these two practices (...)
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  10. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: A Commentary on Controversies in the Determination of Death, A White Paper by the President's Council on Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):185-193.
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  11. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2009). The Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: Reply to John Lizza. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (4):397-399.
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  12. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2008). An Apology for Socratic Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):3 – 7.
    Bioethics is a hybrid discipline. As a theoretical enterprise it stands for untrammeled inquiry and argument. Yet it aims to influence medical practice and policy. In this article we explore tensions between these two dimensions of bioethics and examine the merits and perils of a “Socratic” approach to bioethics that challenges “the conventional wisdom.”.
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  13. Franklin G. Miller & Robert D. Truog (2008). Rethinking the Ethics of Vital Organ Donations. Hastings Center Report 38 (6):38-46.
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  14. David M. Browning, Elaine C. Meyer, Dara Brodsky & Robert D. Truog (2007). Reflections on Love, Fear, and Specializing in the Impossible. Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (4):373.
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  15. Robert D. Truog (2007). Brain Death - Too Flawed to Endure, Too Ingrained to Abandon. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):273-281.
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  16. Robert D. Truog & Thomas I. Cochrane (2006). The Truth About" Donation After Cardiac Death". Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):133.
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  17. Robert D. Truog & Christine Mitchell (2006). Futility - From Hospital Policies to State Laws. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):19 – 21.
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  18. Robert D. Truog (2005). Are Organs Personal Property or a Societal Resource? American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):14 – 16.
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  19. Robert D. Truog (2005). Organ Donation Without Brain Death? Hastings Center Report 35 (6):3-3.
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  20. Christine Mitchell & Robert D. Truog (2003). A Bridge to Nowhere. Journal of Clinical Ethics 14 (3):189.
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  21. Robert D. Truog (2003). Dying Patients as Research Subjects. Hastings Center Report 33 (1):3.
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  22. Howard Klepper & Robert D. Truog (1997). Treating the Patient to Benefit Others. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (03):306-.
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  23. Robert D. Truog (1997). Is It Time to Abandon Brain Death? Hastings Center Report 27 (1):29-37.
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  24. Lawrence J. Nelson, Cindy Hylton Ruston, Ronald E. Cranford, Robert M. Nelson, Jacqueline J. Glover & Robert D. Truog (1995). Forgoing Medically Provided Nutrition and Hydration in Pediatric Patients. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (1):33-46.
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  25. Robert D. Truog (1995). Progress in the Futility Debate. Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (2):128.
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  26. Robert D. Truog & Jeffrey P. Burns (1993). To Breathe or Not to Breathe. Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (1):39-41.
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  27. Robert D. Truog (1992). Beyond Futility: Commentary. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (2):143.
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  28. Robert D. Truog (1992). Locked-in Syndrome and Ethics Committee Deliberation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (3):209.
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  29. Robert D. Truog (1992). Triage in the ICU. Hastings Center Report 22 (3):13-17.
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  30. Robert D. Truog & John C. Fletcher (1990). Brain Death and the Anencephalic Newborn. Bioethics 4 (3):199–215.