Search results for 'Robert D.'Amico' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert D.'Amico (1995). Is Disease a Natural Kind? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (5):551-569.score: 870.0
    , Lawrie Reznek argues that disease is not a natural kind term. I raise objections to Reznek's two central arguments for establishing that disease is not a natural kind. In criticizing his a priori, conceptual argument against naturalism, I argue that his conclusion rests on a weaker argument that appeals to the empirical diversity in the symptoms and manifestations of disease. I also raise questions about the account of natural kinds which Reznek utilizes and his point that conventions for classification (...)
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  2. Linda Alcoff (1992). Historicism and Knowledge, by Robert D'Amico. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):241-243.score: 450.0
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  3. Chris Leafloor (1985). Robert D'Amico, Marx and Philosophy of Culture Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 5 (2):52-54.score: 450.0
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  4. Albert Fell (1992). Robert D'Amico, Historicism and Knowledge Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (3):179-181.score: 450.0
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  5. Elijah Weber (2012). Context-Dependence in Searle's Impossibility Argument: A Reply to Butchard and D'Amico. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (3):433-444.score: 300.0
    John Searle claims that social-scientific laws are impossible because social phenomena are physically open-ended. William Butchard and Robert D’Amico have recently argued that, by Searle’s own lights, money is a social phenomena that is physically closed. However, Butchard and D’Amico rely on a limited set of data in order to draw this conclusion, and fail to appreciate the implications of Searle’s theory of social ontology with regard to the physical open-endedness of money. Money is not physically open-ended in the (...)
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  6. Robert D'Amico (1985). Deconstructing D'Amico, or Why Joel Whitebook is so Upset. Telos 1985 (64):153-156.score: 297.0
    My review of Cornelius Castoriadis' book Crossroads in the Labyrinth ended with the apt reference, I now see, to the emperor being naked. In Joel Whitebook's second review, largely irrelevant to my criticisms of Castoriadis, he fears, though he doesn't know me personally, that only the lack of psychological counseling can explain my uncontrolled anger against Castoriadis. Let me dignify his long distance psychoanalysis by passing over it in silence. Silence is also the best remedy for Whitebook's transcendental deduction that (...)
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  7. Lawrie Reznek (1995). Dis-Ease About Kinds: Reply to D'Amico. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (5):571-584.score: 140.0
    I argued that a value-free account of our concept of <span class='Hi'>disease</span> cannot be given. Part of this argument consisted in showing that diseases as a class do not constitute a natural kind. To understand this, we need only see that we define and classify conditions into diseases and non-diseases not in terms of their causes but in terms of their effects. While no philosophical position is watertight, the arguments overwhelmingly favour the conclusion that diseases do not constitute a natural (...)
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  8. A. W. van Buren (1937). Vincenzo D'Amico: Necropoli Arcaica di Tufara Valfortore. Pp. 22; 4 text cuts. (Samnium, VIII, nos. 3–4, Aug.-Dec. 1935.) Benevento: Tipi del Sannio, 1935. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (02):88-.score: 140.0
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  9. Charles L. Stinger (1991). John F. D'amico, Theory and Practice in Renaissance Textual Criticism: Beatus Rhenanus Between Conjecture and History. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1988. Pp. Xiv, 310. $38. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (1):145-147.score: 140.0
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  10. Matthias Vollet & Nicolas De Cusa (2006). Besprechungen-Acerca de la Docta Ignoranda. Libro II: Lo Maximo Contracto O Universo (Edicion Bilingue). Introduccion, Traduccion Y Notas: Jorge M. Machetta, Claudia D'Amico Y Silvia Manzo. Buenos Aires (Biblos: Presencias Medievales, Textos) 2004. Isbn: 950-786-423-7. 158 S. [REVIEW] Mitteilungen Und Forschungsbeiträge der Cusanus-Gesellschaft 31:300.score: 140.0
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  11. Matthias Vollet & Nicolas De Cusa (2006). BESPRECHUNGEN-Un Ignorante Discurre Acerca de la Mente.(Idiota. De Mente)(Edicion Bilingue). Introduccion: JORGE M. MACHETTA y CLAUDIA D'AMICO; Traduccion: Jorge M. Machetta; Notas: Circulo de Estudios Cusanos de Buenos Aires. Buenos Aires (Biblos: Presencias Medievales, Textos) 2005. ISBN: 950-786-484-9. 210 S.(Eine Neuauflage des 1999 Herausgegebenen Und Mittlerweile Vergriffenen. Un Ignorante Discum Acerca de la Sabiduria (Idiota de Sapientia) Ist in Planung). [REVIEW] Mitteilungen Und Forschungsbeiträge der Cusanus-Gesellschaft 31:300.score: 140.0
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  12. Robert D'Amico (1999). Contemporary Continental Philosophy. Westview Press.score: 129.0
    Contemporary Continental Philosophy steps back from current debates comparing Continental and analytic philosophy and carefully, yet critically outlines the tradition’s main philosophical views on epistemology and ontology. Forgoing obscure paraphrases, D’Amico provides a detailed, clear account and assessment of the tradition from its founding by Husserl and Heidegger to its challenge by Derrida and Foucault. Though intended as a survey of this tradition throughout the twentieth century, this study’s focus is on the philosophical problems which gave it birth and even (...)
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  13. Robert D'Amico (2005). Sensations and Methodology. In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press.score: 105.0
     
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  14. William Butchard & Robert D'Amico (2011). "Counting As" a Bridge Principle: Against Searle Against Social-Scientific Laws. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (4):455-469.score: 87.0
    John Searle’s argument that social-scientific laws are impossible depends on a special open-ended feature of social kinds. We demonstrate that under a noncontentious understanding of bridging principles the so-called "counts-as" relation, found in the expression "X counts as Y in (context) C," provides a bridging principle for social kinds. If we are correct, not only are social-scientific laws possible, but the "counts as" relation might provide a more perspicuous formulation for candidate bridge principles.
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  15. Robert D'Amico (1981). Husserl on the Foundational Structures of Natural and Cultural Sciences. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (1):5-22.score: 87.0
  16. Robert D'Amico (1997). Impossible Laws. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (3):309-327.score: 87.0
  17. Robert D'amico (2003). Lawrence I. Hatab, Ethics and Finitude: Heideggerian Contributions to Moral Philosophy, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, New York, 2000, Pp. 240. Utilitas 15 (02):251-.score: 87.0
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  18. Robert D'Amico (2010). Heideggerian in Spite of Himself. Telos 2010 (150):161-169.score: 87.0
    As far as I know, this is the first book-length study of Ernst Tugendhat in English. That is a bit of a surprise since Tugendhat is the last of Heidegger's students who went on to develop a significantly distinct philosophical approach, and it was one closer to the practice of philosophy in the United States and England than in Germany. The fact that this book is the author's expanded translation from the Italian probably indicates that this lack of attention to (...)
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  19. Robert D'Amico (1986). Going Relativist. Telos 1986 (67):135-145.score: 87.0
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  20. Robert D'Amico (1993). Book Review:Willful Liberalism: Voluntarism and Individuality in Political Theory and Practice. Richard E. Flathman. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (1):178-.score: 87.0
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  21. Robert D'Amico (1998). Reply to the Introduction to Telos 108. Telos 1998 (110):141-147.score: 87.0
    Before commenting on the “Introduction” to Telos 108 by Piccone, Berman and Ulmen, I want to cite two distinctions relevant to my discussion of it. First, federalism and populism are separate concepts, whatever it turns out is the proper meaning of populism and whether or not the intent of the Introduction was to argue for both. Federalism concerns a type of social organization held to be preferable for relatively complex commercial societies; the kind of societies that presently dominate the first (...)
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  22. Robert D'Amico (2005). Laws and Concepts. Telos 2005 (131):50-64.score: 87.0
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  23. Patrick Baert, Brian Baigrie, Stanley Barrett, Pascal Boyer, Michael Chiarello, R. H. Coase, Lorraine Code, Wes Cooper, Timothy M. Costelloe & Robert D.’Amico (2000). Refereeing in 1997. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (3):480.score: 87.0
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  24. Juan E. Corradi, Robert D'Amico & Paul Piccone (1986). Introduction to Squaring the Hexagon: Special Issue on French Politics and Culture. Telos 1986 (67):3-9.score: 87.0
    When, in Telos #55, we sought to evaluate the meaning and impact of French socialism in power, the verdict turned out to be peculiarly disappointing. The rhetorical question in the Introduction: “Beyond Reform or Revolution?” had already been effectively answered. As early as 1982 French socialism had revealed itself to be a “Gaullism with a Human Face” which did not have much to do either widi reform or revolution, and could provide nothing more -above and beyond the usual cliches—than a (...)
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  25. Robert D'Amico (1986). Essays in Memory of Mitchell Franklin. Telos 1986 (70):6-10.score: 87.0
    From 1969 through the 70's Mitchell Franklin was Emeritus Professor of Law and Philosophy at SUNY Buffalo. Over this period his teaching gradually shifted to philosophy where he gave a series of lectures on Hegel, Marx and Neo-Hegelianism, which attracted and influenced a new group of students. These philosophy students were rediscovering the Continental tradition and turning to phenomenology, Western Marxism and German Idealism against die positivist and analytic traditions which had a dying but tenacious hold on philosophy. The following (...)
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  26. Robert D'Amico (1986). Michel Foucault. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (1):91-93.score: 87.0
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  27. Robert D'Amico (1998). Spreading Disease: A Controversy Concerning the Metaphysics of Disease. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (2):143 - 162.score: 87.0
    This article concerns the metaphysics of disease. Is disease a fixed feature of the world or a social value or preference? I argue that disease is not a value-laden concept and thus debates concerning it differ fundamentally from debates concerning health, harm, or suffering where evaluative judgements are central. I show how the so-called social constructionist view of disease has been motivated both by ethical concerns with medical practices and general theoretical doubts about scientific naturalism. If I can show that (...)
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  28. Robert D'Amico (1973). The Contours and Coupures of Structuralist Theory. Telos 1973 (17):70-97.score: 87.0
    Foucault has spoken recently of the profound disruption in the domain of knowledge at every level of contemporary theory. “From the beginning of this century psychoanalytic, linguistic and ethnographic research has ousted the subject from the laws of his desires, from the forms of his speech, from the rules of his actions and from the systems of his mythical discourses.” It has become increasingly more important to deal with the thrust of these developments at the level of theory, not under (...)
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  29. Robert D'Amico (1994). Burdens of Proof in Modern Discourse. Review of Metaphysics 47 (4):814-815.score: 87.0
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  30. Robert D'Amico (1978). Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Telos 1978 (36):169-183.score: 87.0
    This writer who has warned us of the “ideological” function of both the oeuvre and the author as unquestioned forms of discursive organization has gone quite far in constituting for both these “fictitious unities” the name (with all the problems of such a designation) Michel Foucault. One text under review, La Volonté de Savoir, is the methodological introduction of a projected five-volume history of sexuality. It will apparently circle back over that material which seems to have a special fascination for (...)
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  31. Robert D'Amico (2002). R.M. Hare, 1919-2002. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 76 (2):129 - 130.score: 87.0
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  32. Robert D'Amico & Paul Piccone (2004). The Long March Out of the 20th Century. Telos 2004 (127):2-10.score: 87.0
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  33. Eugenio E. Zaldivar & Robert D'Amico, Was Descartes a Trialist?score: 87.0
    Title from title page of source document.
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  34. Robert D'Amico (1984). Bernard Semmel, Ed., Marxism and the Science of War Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 4 (6):284-286.score: 87.0
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  35. Robert D'Amico (1984). Crossroads in the Labyrinth. Telos 1984 (60):193-200.score: 87.0
    In a political version of the old biological cliché “ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny” Cornelius Castoriadis seems to embody in his personal evolution fetal stages in the labor pains of the left since World War II. According to Dick Howard in the The Marxian Legacy Castoriadis was a youthful member of the Greek Communist Party where opposition to Stalinism lead him to Trotsky. After the war and the resistance he emerges in Paris studying philosophy and cuts his political teeth on the splits (...)
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  36. Robert D'Amico (1989). Historicism and Knowledge. Routledge.score: 87.0
  37. Robert D'Amico (2000). Holistic Republicanism. Telos 2000 (118):183-192.score: 87.0
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  38. Robert D'Amico (1985). Lenin and the End of Politics. Telos 1985 (64):157-165.score: 87.0
    At the end of World War II Karl Popper, at the time a little known philosopher of science, published The Open Society and Its Enemies. He dedicated the book to the victims of both Hitler's and Stalin's camps and called it his “war effort.” The book had an enormous impact and spawned both imitators, such as Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism, and a great deal of debate. Whatever else it accomplished Popper's work politicized the history of ideas. Against the (...)
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  39. Robert D'amico (1994). Sed Amentes Sunt Isti: Against Michel Foucault's Account of Cartesian Skepticism. Philosophical Forum 26 (1):33-48.score: 87.0
     
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  40. Robert D'Amico (1990). Steve Fuller, Social Epistemology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (9):362-365.score: 87.0
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  41. Robert D'Amico (1999). The Poverty of Cosmopolitanism. Telos 1999 (117):167-174.score: 87.0
    This volume contains an essay by Martha Nussbaum in defense of world citizenship or “cosmopolitanism,” as opposed to patriotism, which she defines as any view treating “national boundaries as morally salient,” together with a series of brief supportive (Anthony Appiah and Amartya Sen) and critical (Benjamin Barber, Gertrude Himmelfarb, Hilary Putnam, Immanuel Wallerstein, and Michael Walzer, et al.) comments. The essay originally appeared in The Boston Review in 1994 and led to bringing together the “usual suspects” for a bit of (...)
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  42. Pete Self & Robert D'Amico (1983). Philosophy, Prisons, and Prisoners. Teaching Philosophy 6 (3):269-279.score: 87.0
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  43. John F. D'Amico (1986). F. Edward Cranz, Ed.; Paul Oskar Kristeller, Assoc. Ed., Catalogus Translationum Et Commentariorum; Medieval and Renaissance Latin Translations and Commentaries: Annotated Lists and Guides, 5. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, for the Union Académique Internationale, 1984. Pp. Xxi, 427. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (2):399-400.score: 58.0
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  44. Steven G. Crowell (2002). Is There a Phenomenological Research Program? Synthese 131 (3):419-444.score: 56.0
  45. Robert C. Ulin (1986). The Structural Allegory: Reconstructive Encounters with the New French Thought. Telos 1986 (69):201-203.score: 51.0
    The Structural Allegory is an important contribution to the evaluation of both structuralist and post-structuralist French social theory. What is particularly exciting about this volume is that the ten contributors represent a disciplinary breadth that is as far reaching as the impact of the new French thought itself. In addition, several authors (D'Amico, O'Neill, Levin, and Fekete) challenge directly the structuralist and post-structuralist failure to address the historicity of social formations, the constitutive dimension of human agency, and domination. However, all (...)
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  46. John F. D'Amico (1982). Paolo Cortesi's Rehabilitation of Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola. Bibliothèque d'Humanisme Et Renaissance 44 (1):37-51.score: 34.0
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  47. Peter R. Beckman & Francine D'Amico (eds.) (1994). Women, Gender, and World Politics: Perspectives, Policies, and Prospects. Bergin & Garvey.score: 28.0
    Written as an introductory textbook for the study of world politics and the analysis of gender, this work is suitable for courses in International Relations, ...
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  48. R. D'Amico & W. Butchard (2012). How Not to Save Searle: A Reply to Weber's Reply. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (3):445-448.score: 28.0
    In response to "‘Counting As’ a Bridge Principle: Against Searle Against Social-Scientific Laws," Elijah Weber distinguishes two sorts of physical open-endedness and claims our article appeals to the wrong sort. We clarify that Searle’s notion of physical open-endedness is neither of the notions Weber introduces, thus our original reply to Searle is not targeted by Weber’s objections. Also, Weber’s lengthy example concerning counterfeit currency appears to build-in the extremely contentious assumption that scientific laws are impossible if and when relevant conditions (...)
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  49. Emilio Mordini, David Wright, Kush Wadhwa, Paul De Hert, Eugenio Mantovani, Jesper Thestrup, Guido Van Steendam, Antonio D.’Amico & Ira Vater (2009). Senior Citizens and the Ethics of E-Inclusion. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3):203-220.score: 28.0
    The ageing society poses significant challenges to Europe’s economy and society. In coming to grips with these issues, we must be aware of their ethical dimensions. Values are the heart of the European Union, as Article 1a of the Lisbon Treaty makes clear: “The Union is founded on the values of respect for human dignity…”. The notion of Europe as a community of values has various important implications, including the development of inclusion policies. A special case of exclusion concerns the (...)
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  50. David Wright Emilio Mordini, Paul Hert Kush Wadhwdea, Jesper Thestrup Eugenio Mantovani, Antonio D'Amico Guido Van Steendam & Ira Vater (2009). Senior Citizens and the Ethics of E-Inclusion. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3).score: 28.0
    The ageing society poses significant challenges to Europe’s economy and society. In coming to grips with these issues, we must be aware of their ethical dimensions. Values are the heart of the European Union, as Article 1a of the Lisbon Treaty makes clear: “The Union is founded on the values of respect for human dignity…”. The notion of Europe as a community of values has various important implications, including the development of inclusion policies. A special case of exclusion concerns the (...)
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