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  1.  81
    Robert F. Dobbin & William O. Stephens, Bryn Mawr Classical Review 1999.11.21.
    This work is the latest contribution to the Clarendon Later Ancient Philosophers series edited by Jonathan Barnes and A. A. Long. As with the earlier volumes (John Dillon's Alcinous, The Handbook of Platonism , R. J. Hankinson's Galen, On the Therapeutic Method Books I and II, Richard Bett's Sextus Empiricus, Against the Ethicists, and D. L. Blank's Sextus Empiricus, Against the Grammarians), D(obbin) provides an introduction, an English translation, and a critical commentary predominantly focused on the philosophical content of the (...)
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  2. Robert F. Dobbin (ed.) (2007). Epictetus: Discourses, Book 1. OUP Oxford.
    Robert Dobbin presents a new translation into clear modern English of the first book of Epictetus' Discourses, accompanied by the first ever commentary on the work in English. The Discourses, composed around AD 100, are a key source for ancient Stoicism, one of the most influential schools of thought in Western philosophy.
     
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  3.  48
    Robert Dobbin (1991). Προαίρεσις in Epictetus. Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):111-135.
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  4.  4
    Robert F. Dobbin (1998). E. Cattin, L. Jaffro: [Arrien]: Manuel D’Épictète . Pp. 161. Paris: Flammarion, 1997. Paper. ISBN: 2-08-070797-3. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (2):486.
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  5.  5
    Robert F. Dobbin (2008). L'intrigue philosophique. Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):162-164.
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  6.  3
    Robert Dobbin (1995). Julius Caesar in Jupiter's Prophecy, "Aeneid", Book 1. Classical Antiquity 14 (1):5-40.
    The identity of the Caesar at "Aeneid", 1.286 is a long-standing problem. The prevailing opinion since Heyne favors Augustus, but a few scholars agree with Servius that the Dictator is meant. In recent years the suggestion that Vergil was being deliberately ambiguous has been advanced as a solution to the problem. I argue the case for Julius Caesar anew. The paper is in five sections. The first four deal respectively with the question of nomenclature; chronology; the descriptive epithets applied to (...)
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  7.  14
    Robert Dobbin (1992). Cicero, Tusculan Disputations 2 &. Ancient Philosophy 12 (2):499-501.
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  8.  11
    Robert F. Dobbin (1994). L'intrigue Philosophique: Essai Sur l'Euthydème de Platon. Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):162-164.
  9. Robert Dobbin (1991). Πϱoαιϱεσις in Epictetus. Ancient Philosophy 11:111-35.
     
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  10. Robert Dobbin (1991). "Proairesis" [Greek] in Epictetus. Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):111.
     
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