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  1. Robert E. Allinson (2012). Snakes and Dragons, Rat's Liver and Fly's Leg: The Butterfly Dream Revisited. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):513-520.
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  2. Robert Elliot Allinson (2011). The Butterfly, the Mole and the Sage. Asian Philosophy 19 (3):213-223.
    Zhuangzi chooses a butterfly as a metaphor for transformation, a sighted creature whose inherent nature contains, and symbolizes, the potential for transformation from a less valued state to a more valued state. If transformation is not to be valued; if, according to a recent article by Jung Lee, 'there is no implication that it is either possible or desirable for the living to awake from their dream', why not tell a story of a mole awakening from a dream? This would (...)
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  3. Robert Elliott Allinson (2007). Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language and then proceeds from that as a starting point. On the other hand, the limitation of language marks the end of Wittgenstein's cogitations. In contrast to Wittgenstein, who thought that one should remain silent about that which cannot be put into words, the message of the Zhuangzi is that one can speak about that (...)
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  4. Robert Elliott Allinson (2005). The General and the Master: The Subtext of the Philosophy of Emotion and its Relationship to Obtaining Enlightenment in the Platform Sutra. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 2:213-229.
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  5. Robert Elliott Allinson (2004). Circles Within a Circle: The Condition for the Possibility of Ethical Business Institutions Within a Market System. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):17-28.
    How can a business institution function as an ethical institution within a wider system if the context of the wider system is inherently unethical? If the primary goal of an institution, no matter how ethical it sets out to be, is to function successfully within a market system, how can it reconcile making a profit and keeping its ethical goals intact? While it has been argued that some ethical businesses do exist, e.g., Johnson and Johnson, the argument I would like (...)
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  6. Robert E. Allinson (2003). Aristotle and Averroes. Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3-4):189-197.
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  7. Robert E. Allinson (2003). On Chuang Tzu as a Deconstructionist with a Difference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):487-500.
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  8. Robert Elliott Allinson (2003). Hillel and Confucius: The Prescriptive Formulation of the Golden Rule in the Jewish and Chinese Confucian Ethical Traditions. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):29-41.
    A prospective convert asked Hillel to teach him the entire Torahwhile standing on one foot. Hillel replied, What is hateful to yourself, do not do to your fellow man. That isthe whole of Torah and the remainder is but commentary. Go and study it. (Hillel:Shab. 31; emphasis added) Zigong: Is there asingle word that can serve as a guide to conduct throughout one’s life? Confucius said: Perhaps the word ‘shu’, ‘reciprocity’: ‘Do not do to others what you would not want (...)
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  9. Robert E. Allinson (1998). Ethical Values as Part of the Definition of Business Enterprise and Part of the Internal Structure of the Business Oganization. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1015 - 1028.
    The orientation of this paper is that there is no special science of "business ethics" any more than there is one of "medical ethics" or "legal ethics". While there may be issues that arise in medicine or law that require special treatment, the ways of relating to such issues are derived from a basic ethical stance. Once one has evolved such an ethical stance and thus has incorporated a fundamental mode of relating to her or his fellow human beings, the (...)
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  10. Robert E. Allinson (1998). Plato's Forgotten Four Pages of the Seventh Epistole. Philosophical Inquiry 20 (1-2):49-61.
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  11. Robert E. Allinson (1998). The “Cog in the Machine” Manifesto. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (4):743-756.
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  12. Robert E. Allinson (1998). Complementarity as a Model for East-West Integrative Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):505-517.
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  13. Robert E. Allinson (1998). The Debate Between Mencius and Hsün-Tzu: Contemporary Applications. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (1):31-49.
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  14. Robert E. Allinson (1996). Moral Values and the Daoist Sage in the Dao Dejing. In Brian Carr (ed.), Morals and Society in Asian Philosophy. Curzon. 1--156.
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  15. Robert E. Allinson (1994). Moral Values and the Taoist Sage in the Tao de Ching. Asian Philosophy 4 (2):127 – 136.
    Abstract The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Tao de Ching regarding moral values and the Taoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Tao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral behaviour (...)
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  16. Robert E. Allinson (1993). Anselm's One Argument. Philosophical Inquiry 15 (1-2):16-19.
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  17. Robert E. Allinson (1992). The Golden Rule as the Core Value in Confucianism & Christianity: Ethical Similarities and Differences. Asian Philosophy 2 (2):173 – 185.
    Abstract One side of this paper is devoted to showing that the Golden Rule, understood as standing for universal love, is centrally characteristic of Confucianism properly understood, rather than graded, familial love. In this respect Confucianism and Christianity are similar. The other side of this paper is devoted to arguing contra 18 centuries of commentators that the negative sentential formulation of the Golden Rule as found in Confucius cannot be converted to an affirmative sentential formulation (as is found in Christianity) (...)
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  18. Robert E. Allinson (1992). A Hermeneutic Reconstruction of the Child in the Well Example. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 19 (3):297-308.
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  19. Robert E. Allinson (1989). On the Question of Relativism in the Chuang-Tzu. Philosophy East and West 39 (1):13-26.
  20. Robert E. Allinson (ed.) (1989). Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots. Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from Western philosophy. The book (...)
     
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  21. Robert E. Allinson (1988). A Logical Reconstruction of the Butterfly Dream: The Case for Internal Textual Transformation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):319-339.
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  22. Robert E. Allinson (1986). Having Your Cake and Eating It, Too: Evaluation and Trans-Evaluation in Chuang Tzu and Nietzsche. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (4):429-443.
  23. Robert Eliot Allinson (1986). A banquet. Filosofia Oggi 9 (3):435-442.
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  24. Robert E. Allinson (1985). The Confucian Golden Rule: A Negative Formualtion. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (3):305-315.
  25. Robert E. Allinson (1982). The Homogeneity and the Heterogeneity of the Concept of the Good in Plato. Philosophical Inquiry 4 (1):30-39.
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  26. Robert Eliot Allinson (1982). "A banquet", the first speech. Filosofia Oggi 5 (2):200-207.
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