34 found
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  1.  19
    Robert Elliott Allinson (2015). Of Fish, Butterflies and Birds: Relativism and Nonrelative Valuation in the Zhuangzi. Asian Philosophy 25 (3):238-252.
    I argue that the main theme of the Zhuangzi is that of spiritual transformation. If there is no such theme in the Zhuangzi, it becomes an obscure text with relativistic viewpoints contradicting statements and stories designed to lead the reader to a state of spiritual transformation. I propose to reveal the coherence of the deep structure of the text by clearly dividing relativistic statements designed to break down fixed viewpoints from statements, anecdotes, paradoxes and metaphors designed to lead the reader (...)
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  2.  29
    Robert Elliott Allinson (2004). Circles Within a Circle: The Condition for the Possibility of Ethical Business Institutions Within a Market System. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):17-28.
    How can a business institution function as an ethical institution within a wider system if the context of the wider system is inherently unethical? If the primary goal of an institution, no matter how ethical it sets out to be, is to function successfully within a market system, how can it reconcile making a profit and keeping its ethical goals intact? While it has been argued that some ethical businesses do exist, e.g., Johnson and Johnson, the argument I would like (...)
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  3. Robert E. Allinson (1989). Chuang-Tzu for Spiritual Transformation an Analysis of the Inner Chapters. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    This book offers a fundamentally new interpretation of the philosophy of the Chuang-Tzu. It is the first full-length work of its kind which argues that a deep level cognitive structure exists beneath an otherwise random collection of literary anecdotes, cryptic sayings, and dark allusions. The author carefully analyzes myths, legends, monstrous characters, paradoxes, parables and linguistic puzzles as strategically placed techniques for systematically tapping and channeling the spiritual dimensions of the mind. Allinson takes issue with commentators who have treated the (...)
     
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  4.  30
    Robert Elliot Allinson (2011). The Butterfly, the Mole and the Sage. Asian Philosophy 19 (3):213-223.
    Zhuangzi chooses a butterfly as a metaphor for transformation, a sighted creature whose inherent nature contains, and symbolizes, the potential for transformation from a less valued state to a more valued state. If transformation is not to be valued; if, according to a recent article by Jung Lee, 'there is no implication that it is either possible or desirable for the living to awake from their dream', why not tell a story of a mole awakening from a dream? This would (...)
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  5.  25
    Robert E. Allinson (ed.) (1989). Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots. Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from Western philosophy. The book (...)
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  6. Robert Elliott Allinson (2007). Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language and then proceeds from that as a starting point. On the other hand, the limitation of language marks the end of Wittgenstein's cogitations. In contrast to Wittgenstein, who thought that one should remain silent about that which cannot be put into words, the message of the Zhuangzi is that one can speak about that (...)
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  7.  18
    Robert E. Allinson (2012). Snakes and Dragons, Rat's Liver and Fly's Leg: The Butterfly Dream Revisited. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):513-520.
    The Zhuangzi begins with Peng, a soaring bird transformed from a bounded fish, which is the first metaphor that points beyond limited standpoints to a higher point of view. The transformation is one-way and symbolizes that there is a higher viewpoint to attain which affords mental freedom and the clarity and scope of great vision. Under the alternate thesis of constant transformation, values and understandings must ceaselessly transform and collapse. All cyclical transformations must collapse into skeptical relativism and confusion. But (...)
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  8.  27
    Robert Elliott Allinson (2003). Hillel and Confucius: The Prescriptive Formulation of the Golden Rule in the Jewish and Chinese Confucian Ethical Traditions. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):29-41.
  9.  39
    Robert E. Allinson (2003). On Chuang Tzu as a Deconstructionist with a Difference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):487-500.
    The common understanding of Chuang-Tzu as one of the earliest deconstructionists is only half true. This article sets out to challenge conventional characterizations of Chuang-Tzu by adding the important caveat that not only is he a philosophical deconstructionist but that his writings also reveal a non-relativistic, transcendental basis to understanding. The road to such understanding, as argued by this author, can be found in Chuang-Tzu’s emphasis on the illusory or dream-like nature of the self and, by extension, the subject-object dichotomy (...)
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  10.  44
    Robert E. Allinson (1994). Moral Values and the Taoist Sage in the Tao de Ching. Asian Philosophy 4 (2):127 – 136.
    The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Tao de Ching regarding moral values and the Taoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Tao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral behaviour to (...)
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  11.  21
    Robert E. Allinson (1993). Anselm's One Argument. Philosophical Inquiry 15 (1-2):16-19.
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  12.  79
    Robert E. Allinson (1989). On the Question of Relativism in the Chuang-Tzu. Philosophy East and West 39 (1):13-26.
    This article offers a meta-analysis of contemporary approaches aimed at resolving the internal, relativistic-non-relativistic tension within the text of the Chuang-Tzu. In the first section, the four most commonly applied approaches are unpacked and evaluated, ranging from relativistic approaches such as hard relativism and soft relativism, to approaches that acknowledge both relativism and non-relativism, as well as others which acknowledge neither of the two perspectives (relativism and non-relativism). After demonstrating the immanent difficulties these four types of approaches encounter, the latter (...)
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  13.  33
    Robert E. Allinson (1986). Having Your Cake and Eating It, Too: Evaluation and Trans-Evaluation in Chuang Tzu and Nietzsche. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (4):429-443.
  14.  3
    Robert E. Allinson (2002). Space, Time and the Ethical Foundations. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    In Space, Time and the Ethical Foundations ideas about space and time are developed, unique to the history of philosophy, that match the new physics. A well grounded metaphysics is presented which offers a safe haven between stifling skepticism and wild imagination, and an original philosophical method is demonstrated which sharply demarcates philosophy from the empirical sciences.A new foundation is laid for ethics by grounding ethics on the author's psycho-biological deduction of the emotions that offers a progressive model to replace (...)
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  15.  57
    Robert E. Allinson (1992). The Golden Rule as the Core Value in Confucianism & Christianity: Ethical Similarities and Differences. Asian Philosophy 2 (2):173 – 185.
    One side of this paper is devoted to showing that the Golden Rule, understood as standing for universal love, is centrally characteristic of Confucianism properly understood, rather than graded, familial love. In this respect Confucianism and Christianity are similar. The other side of this paper is devoted to arguing contra 18 centuries of commentators that the negative sentential formulation of the Golden Rule as found in Confucius cannot be converted to an affirmative sentential formulation (as is found in Christianity) without (...)
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  16.  30
    Robert E. Allinson (1985). The Confucian Golden Rule: A Negative Formualtion. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (3):305-315.
  17.  1
    Shu-Hsien Liu & Robert E. Allinson (1988). Harmony and Strife Contemporary Perspectives, East & West.
  18.  10
    Robert E. Allinson (1998). The “Cog in the Machine” Manifesto. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (4):743-756.
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  19.  39
    Robert E. Allinson (1998). The Debate Between Mencius and Hsün-Tzu: Contemporary Applications. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (1):31-49.
    This article takes one of the richest historical debates, that of Hsun-Tzu and Mencius, as the contextual starting-point for the elaboration of human goodness. In support of Mencius, this article develops additional metaphysical and bio-social-evolutionary grounds, both of which parallel each other. The metaphysical analysis suggests that, in the spirit of Spinoza, an entity’s nature must necessarily include the drive toward its preservation. Likewise, the multi-faceted bio-social-evolutionary argument locates the fundamental telos of humanity in the preservation of social ties and (...)
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  20.  31
    Robert E. Allinson (1988). A Logical Reconstruction of the Butterfly Dream: The Case for Internal Textual Transformation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):319-339.
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  21.  43
    Robert E. Allinson (1998). Ethical Values as Part of the Definition of Business Enterprise and Part of the Internal Structure of the Business Oganization. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1015 - 1028.
    The orientation of this paper is that there is no special science of "business ethics" any more than there is one of "medical ethics" or "legal ethics". While there may be issues that arise in medicine or law that require special treatment, the ways of relating to such issues are derived from a basic ethical stance. Once one has evolved such an ethical stance and thus has incorporated a fundamental mode of relating to her or his fellow human beings, the (...)
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  22.  16
    Robert E. Allinson (1998). Complementarity as a Model for East-West Integrative Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):505-517.
    Using the particular case of Niels Bohr’s early exposure to Lao-Tzu and subsequent discovery of wave-particle complementarity in quantum physics, this article discusses the benefits of integrative hermeneutics in philosophy and a metaphysical system based on the Chinese, Yin-Yang conception of change. As with Bohr’s dual perspective approach to the wave-particle, in which describing matter as either wave or particle is not considered inherently contradictory, this article likewise argues that Eastern and Western perspectives about philosophy, reality and life in general (...)
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  23.  3
    Robert E. Allinson (1996). Moral Values and the Daoist Sage in the Dao Dejing. In Brian Carr (ed.), Morals and Society in Asian Philosophy. Curzon 1--156.
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  24. Robert E. Allinson (2001). A Metaphysics for the Future. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    This work is intended to serve not only as an expression of a new idea of a philosophy, but as an apologia for philosophy as a legitimate and independent discipline in its own right. It argues that in the 20th century, truth has not been abandoned, but merely modified. The text proposes a return to truth and suggests that it is only after apprehending the truths of consciousness that the philosopher's mirror may become a kaleidoscope through which reality may be (...)
     
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  25.  8
    Robert E. Allinson (1998). Plato's Forgotten Four Pages of the Seventh Epistole. Philosophical Inquiry 20 (1-2):49-61.
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  26.  3
    Robert Elliott Allinson (2005). The General and the Master: The Subtext of the Philosophy of Emotion and its Relationship to Obtaining Enlightenment in the Platform Sutra. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 2:213-229.
  27.  8
    Robert E. Allinson (2003). Aristotle and Averroes. Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3-4):189-197.
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  28.  12
    Robert E. Allinson (1982). The Homogeneity and the Heterogeneity of the Concept of the Good in Plato. Philosophical Inquiry 4 (1):30-39.
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  29.  16
    Robert E. Allinson (1992). A Hermeneutic Reconstruction of the Child in the Well Example. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 19 (3):297-308.
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  30. Robert Eliot Allinson (1986). A banquet. Filosofia Oggi 9 (3):435-442.
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  31. Robert Eliot Allinson (1982). "A banquet", the first speech. Filosofia Oggi 5 (2):200-207.
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  32. Robert Elliott Allinson (1972). Five Dialogues on Knowledge and Reality. Dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin
     
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  33. Robert E. Allinson & Diane Vaughan (1998). The "Cog in the Machine" Manifesto: The Banality and the Inevitability of EvilThe Challenger Launch Decision: Risky Technology, Culture and Deviance at NASA. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (4):743.
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  34. Thomas F. McMahon & Robert E. Allinson (2002). Classic CasesGlobal Disasters: Inquiries Into Management Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):99.
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