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  1. Robert E. MacLaury (1999). Asymmetry Among Hering Primaries Thwarts the Inverted Spectrum Argument. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):960-961.
    Purest points of Hering's six primary colors reside at different levels of lightness such that inversion of each hue pair would be detectable in subjects' choice of foci on the Munsell array. An inverted spectrum would not impose the isomorphism constraint on a contrast of red-green or yellow-blue, whatever we conclude about inference in functionalism.
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  2. Robert E. MacLaury (1998). Domain-Specificity in Folk Biology and Color Categorization: Modularity Versus Global Process. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):582-583.
    Universal ranks in folk biological taxonomy probably apply to taxonomies of cultural artifacts. We cannot call folk biological cognition domain-specific and modular. Color categorization may manifest unique organization, which would result from known neurology and the nature of color as an attribute. But folk biology does not adduce equivalent evidence. A global process of increasing differentiation similarly affects folk taxonomy, color categorization, and other practices germane to Atran's anthropology of science; this is beclouded by claims of specificity and modularity.
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  3. Robert E. MacLaury (1997). Ethnographic Evidence of Unique Hues and Elemental Colors. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):202-203.
    Contrary to argument that unique hues are undemonstrated, the World Color Survey shows that speakers of more than 100 minor and tribal languages focus color categories predominantly on 4 of the 40 hue columns of the ethnographic Munsell array. The pattern is not conditioned by saturation levels or other arbitrary structures among the color chips, nor is Western influence likely to be the cause. Moreover, all evidence suggests that color cognition is autonomous despite the connotations and polysemies of color terms.
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  4. Robert E. Maclaury, Judit Almási & Zoltán Kövecses (1997). Hungarian Piros and Vörös: Color From Points of View. Semiotica 114 (1-2):67-82.
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