39 found
Sort by:
  1. Robert Elliot (forthcoming). A Subjectivist Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics: The Big Questions.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Spencer Abraham, Ray Anderson, Nik Ansell, St Thomas Aquinas, St Francis of Assisi, William Baxter, Philip J. Bentley, Joachim Blatter, Murray Bookchin, Maya Brennan, Majora Carter, Carl Cohen, Deane Curtin, Herman Daly, David DeGrazia, Bill Devall, Calvin DeWitt, David Ehrenfeld, Paul, Anne Ehrlich, Robert Elliot, Stuart Ewen, Nuria Fernandez, Stephen Gardiner, Ramachandra Guha, Garrett Hardin, Eugene Hargrove, John Hasse, Po-Keung Ip, Ralf Isenmann, Kauser Jahan, Marianne B. Karsh, Andrew Kernohan, Marti Kheel, Kenneth Kraft, Aldo Leopold, Miriam MacGillis, Juan Martinez-Alier, Ed McGaa, Katie McShane, Roberto Mechoso, Arne Naess, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Michael Nelson, Bryan Norton, Philip Nyhus, John O'Neil, Stephen Pacala, Ernest Partridge, Erv Peterson, Tom Regan, Holmes Rolston Iii, Lily-Marlene Russow, Mark Sagoff, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Erroll Schweizer, George Sessions, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Stephen Socolow, Paul Steidlmeier, Richard Sylvan, Bron Taylor & Paul Taylor (2009). Earthcare: An Anthology in Environmental Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Dale Jamieson & Robert Elliot (2009). Progressive Consequentialism. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):241-251.
    Consequentialism is the family of theories that holds that acts are morally right, wrong, or indifferent in virtue of their consequences. Less formally and more intuitively, right acts are those that produce good consequences. A consequentialist theory includes at least the following three elements: an account of the properties or states in virtue of which consequences make actions right, wrong, or indifferent; a deontic principle which specifies how or to what extent the properties or states must obtain in order for (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robert Elliot (2005). Instrumental Value in Nature as a Basis for the Intrinsic Value of Nature as a Whole. Environmental Ethics 27 (1):43-56.
    Some environmental ethicists believe that nature as whole has intrinsic value. One reason they do is because they are struck by the extent to which nature and natural processes give rise to so much that has intrinsic value. The underlying thought is that the value-producing work that nature performs, its instrumentality, imbues nature with a value that is more than merely instrumental. This inference, from instrumental value to a noninstrumental value (such as intrinsic value or systemic value), has been criticized. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Marcia Muelder Eaton, Robert Elliot, Gerry Ellis, Karen Kane & Natural Aesthetics (2003). 156 Part One: The Multidisciplinary Context of Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics: Divergence and Convergence 35 (4):155.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Robert Elliot (1997). Faking Nature: The Ethics of Environmental Restoration. Routledge.
    Faking Nature explores the arguments surrounding the concept of ecological restoration. This is a crucial process in the modern world and is central to companies' environmental policy; whether areas restored after ecological destruction are less valuable than before the damage took place. Elliot discusses the pros and cons of the argument and examines the role of humans in the natural world. This volume is a timely and provocative analysis of the simultaneous destruction and restoration of the natural world and the (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Robert Elliot (1997). Genetic Therapy, Person-Regarding Reasons and the Determination of Identity. Bioethics 11 (2):151–160.
    It has been argued for example by Ingmar Persson, that genetic therapy performed on a conceptus does not alter the identity of the person that develops from it, even if we are essentially persons. If this claim is true then there can be person-regarding reasons for performing genetic therapy on a conceptus. Here it is argued that such person-regarding reasons obtain only if we are not essentially persons but essentially animals. This conclusion requires the defeat of the origination theory, which (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert Elliot (1996). Facts About Natural Values. Environmental Values 5 (3):221 - 234.
    Some environmental philosophers believe that the rejection of anthropocentric ethics requires the development and defence of an objectivist meta-ethical theory according to which values are, in the most literal sense. discovered not conferred. It is argued that nothing of normative or motivational import, however, turns on the meta-ethical issue. It is also argued that a rejection of normative anthropocentrism is completely consistent with meta-ethical subjectivism. Moreover the dynamics and outcomes of rational debate about normative environmental ethics are not determined by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert Elliot (1995). Consequentialism and Absolutism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (1):145 – 151.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert Elliot (ed.) (1995). Environmental Ethics. OUP Oxford.
    This volume offers a selection of some of the best and most interesting articles that have been written on ethics and the environment in the past two decades. It constitutes an ideal introduction to the main debates in the area, dealing with issues such as duties to future people, resource conservatism, species and wilderness preservation, the relevance of ecology to ethics, ecofeminism, and the tension between political liberalism and environmentalism. This book will be of interest not just to professional philosophers (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert Elliot (1995). Personal Identity, Potentiality and Abortion. Philosophical Papers 24 (2):141-149.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert Elliot (1994). Ecology and the Ethics of Environmental Restoration. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:31-43.
    In this volume leading international environmental philosophers further the debate about the value of nature, the concept of the environment, and the metaphysical, ethical, social and international implications of these concepts. Philosophers have to some extent neglected the study of nature and the natural environment, and this collection not only provides a long-overdue contribution to that study, but also points to inadequacies of much contemporary ethical and political theory. For environmentalists who are not philosophers, it will stimulate reflection on their (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Robert Elliot (1994). Extinction, Restoration, Naturalness. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):135-144.
    Alastair S. Gunn has argued that it is in principle possible to restore degraded natural environments and to restore their full value, provided that species distinctive to them are extant. I argue, first, that the proviso is unnecessary. More importantly, I claim that full value cannot be restored because restored environments lack the relational property of being naturally evolved. I delineate and explain the structure and detail of the theoretical bases for this claim and show that Gunn’s reflections do not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Robert Elliot (1993). Divine Perfection, Axiology and the No Best World Defence. Religious Studies 29 (4):533 - 542.
    Advocates of the traditional argument from evil assume that an omnipotent and morally perfect being, God, would create a world of the greatest value possible. They dispute that this world is such a world. It is difficult to disagree. They go on to conclude that this world could not have been created by God. It is, however, possible consistently both to agree that God could have guaranteed the existence of a better world than this world and to reject the conclusion (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Robert Elliot (1993). Identity and the Ethics of Gene Therapy. Bioethics 7 (1):27–40.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Robert Elliot (1992). Intrinsic Value, Environmental Obligation and Naturalness. The Monist 75 (2):138-160.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Robert Elliot (1991). Personal Identity and the Causal Continuity Requirement. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (January):55-75.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Robert Elliot (1989). Environmental Degradation, Vandalism and the Aesthetic Object Argument. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (2):191 – 204.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Robert Elliot (1989). The Rights of Future People. Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):159-170.
    It has been argued by some that the present non-existence of future persons entails that whatever obligations we have towards them are not based on rights which they have or might come to have. This view is refuted. It is argued that the present non-existence of future persons is no impediment to the attribution of rights to them. It is also argued that, even if the present non-existence of future persons were an impediment to the attribution of rights to them, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Robert Elliot (1987). Animals, Ecosystems and the Liberal Ethic, STEPHEN RL CLARK. The Monist 70 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Robert Elliot (1987). Moral Autonomy, Self-Determination and Animal Rights. The Monist 70 (1):83-97.
  22. Robert Elliot (1987). Moral Realism and the Modal Argument. Analysis 47 (3):133 - 137.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Robert Elliot (1986). Making Children Moral. Educational Theory 36 (3):289-299.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Robert Elliot (1986). Future Generations, Locke's Proviso and Libertarian Justice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):217-227.
    Libertarian justice arguably permits much that is harsh. It might plausibly be thought to generate only minimal obligations on the part of present people toward future generations. This turns out not to be so, at least on Nozick's version of libertarian justice, which is among the most thoroughly worked-out versions. Nozickian justice generates extensive obligations to future people. This provides an indirect argument for environmentalist policies such as resource conservation and wilderness preservation. The basis for these obligations is Nozick's use (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Robert Elliot (1985). Critical Notices. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63 (4):499 – 509.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Robert Elliot (1985). Meta‐Ethics and Environmental Ethics. Metaphilosophy 16 (2‐3):103-117.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Robert Elliot (1984). Rawlsian Justice and Non-Human Animals. Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):95-106.
    In his book, A Theory of Justice, John Rawls argues against the inclusion of non-human animals within the scope of the principles of justice developed therein. However, the reasons Rawls, and certain commentators, have advanced in support of this view do not adequately support it. Against Rawls' view that 'we are not required to give strict justice' to creatures lacking the capacity for a sense of justice, it is initially argued that (i) de facto inclusion should be accorded non-human animals (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Robert Elliot & Andre Gallois (1984). Would It Have Been Me? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (3):292 – 293.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert Elliot (1983). Ii. The Value of Wild Nature. Inquiry 26 (3):359 – 361.
    Don Mannison levels three criticisms at the claims I make in ?Faking Nature?. First, he claims that I argue from (1) X is valued to (2) X has value. I do not. Second, he criticizes an argument of Nelson Goodman's to which I allude. While his criticism has point he misrepresents the role I assign to Goodman's argument. Third, he suggests that there is no need for me to count environmental evaluations as evaluations of the moral kind. However, he offers (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Robert Elliot (1982). Curriculum, Morality and Theories About Value. Educational Philosophy and Theory 14 (2):15–28.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Robert Elliot (1982). Faking Nature. Inquiry 25 (1):81 – 93.
    Environmentalists express concern at the destruction/exploitation of areas of the natural environment because they believe that those areas are of intrinsic value. An emerging response is to argue that natural areas may have their value restored by means of the techniques of environmental engineering. It is then claimed that the concern of environmentalists is irrational, merely emotional or even straightforwardly selfish. This essay argues that there is a dimension of value attaching to the natural environment which cannot be restored no (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert Elliot (1982). Going Nowhere Fast? Analysis 42 (4):213 - 215.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Robert Elliot (1981). How to Travel Faster Than Light? Analysis 41 (1):4 - 6.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Robert Elliot (1979). Materialism and Occam's Razor. Philosophy 54 (208):233 - 234.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Robert Elliot (1978). Regan on the Sorts of Beings That Can Have Rights. Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):701-705.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Robert Elliot (1978). Personal Identity, Reduplication and Spatio-Temporal Continuity. Philosophical Papers 7 (2):73-75.
  37. Robert Elliot & Michael Smith (1978). Descartes, God and the Evil Spirit. Sophia 17 (3):33-36.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Robert Elliot & Michael Smith (1977). Individuating Actions: A Reply to McCullagh and Thalberg. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 55 (3):209 – 212.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Robert Elliot (1976). Resurrection and Retrocognition. Sophia 15 (1):28-31.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation