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Profile: Robert Kane (University of Texas at Austin)
  1. Robert H. Kane, Reflections on Free Will, Determinism, and Indeterminism.
    _Some say there is no progress in philosophy, and certainly there is one sense in_ _which they are wrong. There are at least significant developments in philosophical_ _doctrines that have been persistently advocated in the past. With confidence I leave_ _you to arrive at a satisfactory understanding of 'significant'. There is no doubt that_ _Robert Kane has made some progress, probably more than any other contemporary_ _philosopher, in the laying out and defending of the doctrine that an understandable_ _freedom is (...)
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  2. Robert H. Kane (2006). Libertarian Accounts of Free Will. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (457):136-142.
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  3. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will&Quot;. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, Henry Stapp.
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  4. Robert H. Kane (2005). Free Agency and Laws of Nature. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):46-53.
  5. Robert H. Kane, Symposium: The Psychology of Free Will. Commentary.
    These three papers are exceptionally rich and varied and I will be selective in responding. My aim is to relate the psychological research they discuss to the broader context of current philosophical debates about free will.
     
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  6. Robert H. Kane (2004). Agency, Responsibility, and Indeterminism: Reflections on Libertarian Theories of Free Will. In Ted Honderich (ed.), Freedom and Determinism. Bradford Book/MIT Press.
     
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  7. Robert H. Kane (2002). Between Chance and Choice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Determinism. Thorverton UK: Imprint Academic.
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  8. Robert H. Kane (2002). Free Will, Determinism, and Indeterminism. In Harald Atmanspacher & Robert C. Bishop (eds.), Between Chance and Choice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Determinism. Thorverton UK: Imprint Academic. 371--406.
  9. Robert H. Kane (2002). Introduction: The Contours of Contemporary Free Will Debates. In , The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  10. Robert H. Kane (2002). Some Neglected Pathways in the Free Will Labyrinth. In , The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press.
     
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  11. Robert H. Kane (2002). The Contours of Contemporary Free Will Debates. In , The Oxford Handbook on Free Will. Oxford University Press.
     
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  12. Robert H. Kane (ed.) (2002). The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press.
    This comprehensive reference provides an exhaustive guide to current scholarship on the perennial problem of Free Will--perhaps the most hotly and voluminously debated of all philosophical problems. While reference is made throughout to the contributions of major thinkers of the past, the emphasis is on recent research. The essays, most of which are previously unpublished, combine the work of established scholars with younger thinkers who are beginning to make significant contributions. Taken as a whole, the Handbook provides an engaging and (...)
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  13. Robert H. Kane (ed.) (2001). Free Will. Blackwell.
    Over the past three decades, I have been developing a distinctive view of free will motivated by a desire to reconcile a non-determinist (incompatibilistor libertarian) view of free will with modern science as well as with recent developments in philosophy. A view of free will of the kind I defend (called a “causalindeterminist” or “event-causal” view in the current literature) did not exist in a developed form before the 1980s, but is now discussed in the philosophical literature as one of (...)
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  14. Robert H. Kane (ed.) (2001). Oxford Handbook on Free Will. Oxford University Press.
    This comprehensive reference provides an exhaustive guide to current scholarship on the perennial problem of Free Will--perhaps the most hotly and voluminously debated of all philosophical problems. While reference is made throughout to the contributions of major thinkers of the past, the emphasis is on recent research. The essays, most of which are previously unpublished, combine the work of established scholars with younger thinkers who are beginning to make significant contributions. Taken as a whole, the Handbook provides an engaging and (...)
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  15. Robert H. Kane (2000). Non-Constraining Control and the Threat of Social Conditioning. Journal of Ethics 4 (4):401-403.
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  16. Robert H. Kane (2000). Responses to Bernard Berofsky, John Martin Fischer and Galen Strawson. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):157-167.
  17. Robert H. Kane (2000). Replies to Fischer and Haji. Journal of Ethics 4 (4):338-342.
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  18. Robert H. Kane (2000). The Dual Regress of Free Will and the Role of Alternative Possibilities. Philosopical Perspectives 14 (s14):57-80.
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  19. Robert H. Kane (1999). New Directions on Free Will. In The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 2: Metaphysics. Bowling Green: Philosophy Doc Ctr. 135-142.
    Libertarian or incompatibilist conceptions of free will (according to which free will is incompatible with determinism) have been under withering attack in the modern era of Western philosophy as obscure and unintelligible and have been dismissed as outdated by many twentieth century philosophers and scientists because of their supposed lack of fit with modern images of human beings in the natural and human sciences. In a recent book (The Significance of Free Will), I attempt to reconcile incompatibilist free will with (...)
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  20. Robert H. Kane (1999). On Free Will, Responsibility and Indeterminism: Responses to Clarke, Haji, and Mele. Philosophical Explorations 2 (2):105-121.
    This paper responds to three critical essays on my book, The Significance of Free Will(Oxford, 1996) by Randolph Clarke, Istiyaque Haji and Alfred Mele (which essays appear in this issue and an earlier issue of this journal). This response first explains crucial features of the theory of free will of the book, including the notion of ultimate responsibility.The paper then answers objections of Haji and Mele that the occurrence of undetermined choices would be matters of luck or chance, and so (...)
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  21. Robert H. Kane (1999). Responsibility, Luck, and Chance: Reflections on Free Will and Determinism. Journal of Philosophy 96 (5):217-40.
    Consider the following principle: (LP) If an action is undetermined at a time t, then its happening rather than not happening at t would be a matter of chance or luck, and so it could not be a free and responsible action. This principle (which we may call the luck principle, or simply LP) is false, as I shall explain shortly. Yet it seems true.
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  22. Robert H. Kane (1999). The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, Volume 2: Metaphysics. Bowling Green: Philosophy Doc Ctr.
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  23. Robert H. Kane (1996). Free Will, Responsibility, and Will-Setting. Philosophical Topics 24 (2):67-90.
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  24. Robert H. Kane (1996). The Significance of Free Will. Oxford University Press.
    In the past quarter-century, there has been a resurgence of interest in philosophical questions about free will. After a clear and broad-reaching survey of these recent debates, Robert Kane presents his own controversial view. Arguing persuasively for a traditional incompatibilist or libertarian conception of free will, Kane demonstrates that such a conception can be made intelligible without appeals to obscure or mysterious forms of agency and thus can be reconconciled with a contemporary scientific picture of the world.
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  25. Robert H. Kane (1994). Free Will: The Elusive Ideal. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 75 (1-2):25-60.
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  26. Robert H. Kane (1989). Two Kinds of Incompatibilism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (December):219-54.
    The present essay is about this problem of the intelligibility of incompatibilist freedom. I do not think Kant, Nagel and Strawson are right in thinking that incompatibilist theories cannot be made intelligible to theoretical reason, nor are those many others right who think that incompatibilist accounts of freedom must be essentially mysterious or terminally obscure. I doubt if I can say enough in one short paper to convince anyone of these claims who is not already persuaded. But I hope to (...)
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  27. Robert H. Kane (1988). Libertarianism and Rationality Revisited. Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):441-60.
  28. Robert H. Kane (1985). Free Will and Values. SUNY Press.
    This book is about free will and the relativity of values, two topics that seem to have little in common beyond the fact that both have been the subject of ...
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  29. Robert H. Kane (1967). Empiricism and Ontology in Rudolf Carnap's Thought. International Philosophical Quarterly 7 (1):138-176.
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  30. Robert H. Kane (1966). Turing Machines and Mental Reports. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 44 (December):344-52.
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