Search results for 'Robert J. Good' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert J. Good (1999). Why Are Chemists 'Turned Off' by Philosophy of Science? Foundations of Chemistry 1 (2):65-95.score: 870.0
    The most immediate reason why chemists are unenthusiastic about the philosophy of science is the historic hostility of important philosophers, to the concept of atoms. (Without atoms, discovery in chemistry would have proceeded with glacial slowness, if at all, in the last 200 years.) Other important reasons include the anti-realist influence of the philosophical dogmas of logical positivism, instrumentalism, of strict empiricism. Though (as has been said) these doctrines have recently gone out of fashion, they are still very influential.A diagram (...)
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  2. Robert J. Good (1977). Modeling Cell Rearrangement Mathematical Models for Cell Rearrangement G. D. Mostow. BioScience 27 (12):816-816.score: 870.0
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  3. Lyle E. Angene, John J. Carey, Joseph Owens, Robert C. Good & Winfield E. Nagley (1978). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):258-263.score: 810.0
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  4. I. J. Good (1982). A Good Explanation of an Event is Not Necessarily Corroborated by the Event. Philosophy of Science 49 (2):251-253.score: 600.0
    It is shown by means of a simple example that a good explanation of an event is not necessarily corroborated by the occurrence of that event. It is also shown that this contention follows symbolically if an explanation having higher "explicativity" than another is regarded as better.
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  5. Irving J. Good (1983). Good Thinking: The Foundations of Probability and its Applications. Univ Minnesota Pr.score: 600.0
    ... Press for their editorial perspicacity, to the National Institutes of Health for the partial financial support they gave me while I was writing some of the chapters, and to Donald Michie for suggesting the title Good Thinking.
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  6. I. J. Good (1962). Errata and Corrigenda for Good and Good. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (49):88.score: 540.0
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  7. Michael A. Day (2007). J. Robert Oppenheimer: Good Times–Hard Times. [REVIEW] Metascience 16 (2):267-270.score: 435.0
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  8. I. J. Good (1969). Godel's Theorem is a Red Herring. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (February):357-8.score: 360.0
  9. James A. Good (2013). Faith in Life: John Dewey's Early Philosophy By Donald J. Morse. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (2):250-257.score: 360.0
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  10. James Good (2013). Faith in Life: John Dewey's Early Philosophy by Donald J. Morse (Review). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 49 (2):250-257.score: 360.0
    Presumably, great men, including John Dewey, have great flaws. For decades, Dewey scholars assumed that the Hegelian cast of his early philosophy proved, prima facie, that it was merely derivative and hopelessly metaphysical in the worst possible sense of that term, as though nothing original or practically applicable to real life could possibly come from studying Hegel. I believe it is fair to say that, among Dewey scholars, the term “Hegelian” became an ossified pejorative that required little, if any, explanation. (...)
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  11. Jason Scott Robert (2009). What Good is Science? BioScience 59 (6):524-525.score: 360.0
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  12. Jason Scott Robert (2009). What Good is Science?:Biology Under the Influence: Dialectical Essays on Ecology, Agriculture, and Health. Richard Lewontin and Richard Levins . Monthly Review Press, 2007. 400 Pp., Illus. $22.95 (ISBN 9781583671573 Paper). [REVIEW] BioScience 59 (6):524-525.score: 360.0
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  13. I. J. Good (1975). Comments on Ronald Giere. Synthese 30 (1-2):133 -.score: 300.0
    Good expresses agreement that the controversy between Bayesian and non-Bayesian statistics is more fundamental than that between Carnap and Popper, and points out that his own position is a Bayes/non-Bayes compromise.
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  14. Deborah Giaschi, James E. Jan, Bruce Bjornson, Simon Au Young, Matthew Tata, Christopher J. Lyons, William V. Good & Peter K. H. Wong (2003). Conscious Visual Abilities in a Patient with Early Bilateral Occipital Damage. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 45 (11):772-781.score: 280.0
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  15. Anthony J. Lambert, Kimberly S. Good & Ian J. Kirk (2010). Testing the Repression Hypothesis: Effects of Emotional Valence on Memory Suppression in the Think – No Think Task. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):281-293.score: 280.0
  16. J. Balzer & T. Good (1971). Sexuality and Class Struggle. Telos 1971 (7):145-149.score: 280.0
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  17. Derek J. Chadwick, Janice A. Good & Francesco Ramirez (1997). The Molecular Biology and Pathology of Elastic Tissues. Bioessays 19 (3):267-267.score: 280.0
     
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  18. Byron J. Good & Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good (2012). "To Make a Difference . . .": Narrative Desire in Global Medicine. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (2):121-124.score: 280.0
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  19. Robert L. Simpson, Ralph E. Good, Mary Allessio Leck & Dennis F. Whigham (1983). The Ecology of Freshwater Tidal Wetlands. BioScience 33 (4):255-259.score: 280.0
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  20. I. J. Good (1967). On the Principle of Total Evidence. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 17 (4):319-321.score: 240.0
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  21. I. J. Good (1960). The Paradox of Confirmation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 11 (42):145-149.score: 240.0
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  22. I. J. Good (1967). The White Shoe is a Red Herring. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 17 (4):322.score: 240.0
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  23. I. J. Good (1961). The Paradox of Confirmation (II). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (45):63-64.score: 240.0
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  24. Robert C. Good (1982). Ninian Smart and the Justification of Religious Doctrinal Schemes. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):69 - 75.score: 240.0
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  25. Robert C. Good (1986). Imperatives Again. Metaphilosophy 17 (4):311--317.score: 240.0
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  26. I. J. Good (1983). The Philosophy of Exploratory Data Analysis. Philosophy of Science 50 (2):283-295.score: 240.0
    This paper attempts to define Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) more precisely than usual, and to produce the beginnings of a philosophy of this topical and somewhat novel branch of statistics. A data set is, roughly speaking, a collection of k-tuples for some k. In both descriptive statistics and in EDA, these k-tuples, or functions of them, are represented in a manner matched to human and computer abilities with a view to finding patterns that are not "kinkera". A kinkus is a (...)
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  27. I. J. Good (1966). A Note on Richard's Paradox. Mind 75 (299):431.score: 240.0
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  28. I. J. Good (1990). A Suspicious Feature of the Popper/Miller Argument. Philosophy of Science 57 (3):535-536.score: 240.0
    The form of argument used by Popper and Miller to attack the concept of probabilistic induction is applied to the slightly different situation in which some evidence undermines a hypothesis. The result is seemingly absurd, thus bringing the form of argument under suspicion.
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  29. I. J. Good (1961). A Causal Calculus (I). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 11 (44):305-318.score: 240.0
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  30. I. J. Good (1961). A Causal Calculus (II). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (45):43-51.score: 240.0
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  31. I. J. Good (1971). Free Will and Speed of Computation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):48-50.score: 240.0
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  32. I. J. Good (1967). Human and Machine Logic. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 18 (August):145-6.score: 240.0
  33. J. B. DeConinck & D. J. Good (1989). Perceptual Differences of Sales Practitioners and Students Concerning Ethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (9):667 - 676.score: 240.0
    This study investigates specific behavioral perceptual differences of ethics between practitioners and students enrolled in sales classes. Respondents were asked to indicate their beliefs to issues related to ethics in sales. A highly significant difference was found between mean responses of students and sales personnel. Managers indicated a greater concern for ethical behavior and less attention to sales than did the students. Students indicated a strong desire for success regardless of ethical constraints violated.
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  34. I. J. Good (1959). A Theory of Causality. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (36):307-310.score: 240.0
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  35. I. J. Good (1985). A Historical Comment Concerning Novel Confirmation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (2):184-185.score: 240.0
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  36. I. J. Good (1968). Corroboration, Explanation, Evolving Probability, Simplicity and a Sharpened Razor. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (2):123-143.score: 240.0
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  37. I. J. Good (1968). The White Shoe Qua Herring is Pink. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (2):156-157.score: 240.0
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  38. Byron J. Good (2012). Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, and Subjectivity in Java. Ethos 40 (1):24-36.score: 240.0
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  39. I. J. Good (1984). A Bayesian Approach in the Philosophy of Inference. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (2):161-166.score: 240.0
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  40. I. J. Good (1974). A Little Learning Can Be Dangerous. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (4):340-342.score: 240.0
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  41. I. J. Good & Alan F. McMichael (1984). A Pragmatic Modification of Explicativity for the Acceptance of Hypotheses. Philosophy of Science 51 (1):120-127.score: 240.0
    The use of a concept called "explicativity", for (provisionally) accepting a theory or Hypothesis H, has previously been discussed. That previous discussion took into account the prior probability of H, and hence implicitly its theoretical simplicity. We here suggest that a modification of explicativity is required to allow for what may be called the pragmatic simplicity of H, that is, the simplicity of using H in applications as distinct from the simplicity of the description of H.
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  42. I. J. Good (1975). Comments on David Miller. Synthese 30 (1-2):205 - 206.score: 240.0
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  43. I. J. Good (1962). Errata and Corrigenda. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (49):88-88.score: 240.0
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  44. I. J. Good (1965). Speculations Concerning the First Ultraintelligent Machine. In F. Alt & M. Ruminoff (eds.), Advances in Computers, volume 6. Academic Press.score: 240.0
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  45. I. J. Good (1984). Causal Propensity: A Review. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:829 - 850.score: 240.0
    The causal propensity of an event F to cause another event E is explicated as the weight of evidence against F if E does not occur, given the state of the universe just before F occurred. This definition, first given in 1961, is sharpened, defended, and applied to several examples. In this definition the concept of weight of evidence in favor of a proposition, provided by another one, is to be understood in a technical sense that is intended to capture (...)
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  46. I. J. Good (1959). Lattice Structure of Space-Time. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (36):317-319.score: 240.0
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  47. I. J. Good (1969). Discussion of Bruno de Finetti's Paper 'Initial Probabilities: A Prerequisite for Any Valid Induction'. Synthese 20 (1):17 - 24.score: 240.0
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  48. B. Meltzer & I. J. Good (1965). Two Forms of the Prediction Paradox. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 16 (61):50-51.score: 240.0
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  49. I. J. Good (1987). A Reinstatement, in Response to Gillies, of Redhead's Argument in Support of Induction. Philosophy of Science 54 (3):470-472.score: 240.0
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  50. I. J. Good (1970). A Suggested Resolution of Miller's Paradox. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (3):288-289.score: 240.0
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