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  1. Robert J. Quinlan (2010). Extrinsic Mortality Effects on Reproductive Strategies in a Caribbean Community. Human Nature 21 (2):124-139.
    Extrinsic mortality is a key influence on organisms’ life history strategies, especially on age at maturity. This historical longitudinal study of 125 women in rural Domenica examines effects of extrinsic mortality on human age at maturity and pace of reproduction. Extrinsic mortality is indicated by local population infant mortality rates during infancy and at maturity between the years 1925 and 2000. Extrinsic mortality shows effects on age at first birth and pace of reproduction among these women. Parish death records show (...)
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  2. Robert J. Quinlan (2009). Predicting Cross-Cultural Patterns in Sex-Biased Parental Investment and Attachment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):40-41.
    If parenting behavior influences attachment, then parental investment (PI) theory can predict sex differences and distributions of attachment styles across cultures. Trivers-Willard, local resource competition, and local resource enhancement models make distinct predictions for sex-biased parental responsiveness relevant to attachment. Parental investment and attachment probably vary across cultures in relation to for status, wealth, and well-being.
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  3. Shane J. Macfarlan & Robert J. Quinlan (2008). Kinship, Family, and Gender Effects in the Ultimatum Game. Human Nature 19 (3):294-309.
    Kinship and reciprocity are two main predictors of altruism. The ultimatum game has been used to study altruism in many small-scale societies. We used the ultimatum game to examine effects of individuals’ family and kin relations on altruistic behavior in a kin-based horticultural community in rural Dominica. Results show sex-specific effects of kin on ultimatum game play. Average coefficient of relatedness to the village was negatively associated with women’s ultimatum game proposals and had little effect on men’s proposals. Number of (...)
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  4. Robert J. Quinlan & Marsha B. Quinlan (2008). Human Lactation, Pair-Bonds, and Alloparents. Human Nature 19 (1):87-102.
    The evolutionary origin of human pair-bonds is uncertain. One hypothesis, supported by data from forgers, suggests that pair-bonds function to provision mothers and dependent offspring during lactation. Similarly, public health data from large-scale industrial societies indicate that single mothers tend to wean their children earlier than do women living with a mate. Here we examine relations between pair-bond stability, alloparenting, and cross-cultural trends in breastfeeding using data from 58 “traditional” societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS). Analyses show that stable (...)
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  5. Robert J. Quinlan & Mark V. Flinn (2005). Kinship, Sex, and Fitness in a Caribbean Community. Human Nature 16 (1):32-57.
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  6. Robert J. Quinlan (2001). Effect of Household Structure on Female Reproductive Strategies in a Caribbean Village. Human Nature 12 (3):169-189.
    Household structure may have strong effects on reproduction. This study uses household demographic data for 59 women in a Caribbean village to test evolutionary hypotheses concerning variation in reproductive strategies. Father-absence during childhood, current household composition, and household economic status are predicted to influence age at first birth, number of mates, reproductive success, and pair-bond stability. Criterion variables did not associate in a manner indicative of r- and K-strategies. Father-absence in early childhood had little influence on subsequent reproduction. Household wealth (...)
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  7. Mark V. Flinn, Robert J. Quinlan, Seamus A. Decker, Mark T. Turner & Barry G. England (1996). Male-Female Differences in Effects of Parental Absence on Glucocorticoid Stress Response. Human Nature 7 (2):125-162.
    This study examines the family environments and hormone profiles of 316 individuals aged 2 months-58 years residing in a rural village on the east coast of Dominica, a former British colony in the West Indies. Fieldwork was conducted over an eight-year period (1988–1995). Research methods and techniques include radioimmunoassay of cortisol and testosterone from saliva samples (N=22,340), residence histories, behavioral observations of family interactions, extensive ethnographic interview and participant observation, psychological questionnaires, and medical examinations.Analyses of data indicate complex, sex-specific effects (...)
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