Search results for 'Robert L. Bach' (try it on Scholar)

34 found
Sort by:
  1. Robert L. Bach (2002). New Priorities for Philanthropy. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):20–26.score: 870.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Donald Kennedy, David A. Hamburg, G. L. Bach, Robert McAfee Brown, Sanford M. Dornbusch, David M. Mason & Wolfgang K. H. Panofsky (1972). Decision of the Advisory Board of Stanford University in the Matter of Professor H. Bruce Franklin, 5 January, 1972. Minerva 10 (3):452-483.score: 810.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Général André Bach (2005). La place de l'horizon de mort dans la violence guerrière. Astérion 2.score: 720.0
    Le général André Bach dans une réflexion sur l’« horizon de mort dans la violence de guerre » part d’une approche anthropologique du phénomène de violence et de la peur (quasiment biologique) qu’il engendre en soulignant les difficultés des sociétés occidentales à penser la mort. C’est l’État qui donne à la guerre un sens politique et sacré et qui crée les catégories fonctionnelles de la guerre (les concepts de paix et de guerre ne sont pas en eux-mêmes opérationnels). Dans (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kent Bach (2007). Review of Robert Fiengo, Asking Questions: Using Meaningful Structures to Imply Ignorance. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (11).score: 360.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. K. Bach (2008). Review: Robert J. Stainton: Words and Thoughts: Subsentences, Ellipsis, and the Philosophy of Language. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (467):739-742.score: 360.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. F. U. T. Aepinus, Archibald Alexander, Archibald Alison, John Anderson, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Thomas Aquinas, D. M. Armstrong, Antione Arnauld, J. L. Austin & Johann Sebastian Bach (2004). Index of Names and Subjects. In Terence Cuneo Rene van Woudenberg (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge University Press. 361.score: 280.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1992). How Performatives Really Work: A Reply to Searle. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 15 (1):93 - 110.score: 240.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1982). Katz as Katz Can. Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):168-171.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1983). Review. [REVIEW] Synthese 54 (3):469-493.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1987). Relevant Questions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):711.score: 240.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. F. Ackerman, G. Anscombe, H. Aristar-Dry, K. Bach, C. L. Baker & S. Bayer (1999). Index of Names: Volume 22. Linguistics and Philosophy 22:681-687.score: 240.0
  12. Marilyn L. Bach, Jeffery Smith, Kristine A. Diemer, Erin L. Magnus & Nicholas A. Bryant (1996). Professionals' Responsibilities to Foster the Autonomy of Future Adults. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 5 (3):73-91.score: 240.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. F. X. Alario, S. Allen, G. T. M. Altmann, P. Bach, C. Becchio, I. Blanchette, L. Boroditsky, A. Brown, R. Campbell & U. Cartwright-Finch (2007). Dehaene-Lambertz, G., 261 Dijkstra, K., 139 Dumay, N., 341. Cognition 102:486-487.score: 240.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. L. Althusser, A. Altaian, C. R. Anderson, R. Angelergues, G. Antonucci, D. Armstrong, R. Audi, K. Bach, J. L. Barbur & R. Barthes (1994). A Agliotti, S., 176,186 Alexander, M., 188 Allport, A., 173,252. In Antti Revonsuo & Matti Kamppinen (eds.), Consciousness in Philosophy and Cognitive Neuroscience. Lawrence Erlbaum. 287.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Theodore Bach, Richmond Campbell, Victor Kumar, Justin Clarke-Doane, Glen Pettigrove, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Crowe, Lawrence J. Hatab, Kris McDaniel & Robert Kane (2012). 10. Ian Shapiro, The Real World of Democratic Theory Ian Shapiro, The Real World of Democratic Theory (Pp. 440-444). Ethics 122 (2).score: 240.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Charles Darwin, John Austin, M. Bach, Francis Bacon, C. R. Badcock, H. E. Barnes, Robert N. Bellah, R. Bendix, Henri Bergson & Philippe Besnard (1993). Constant, Benjamin 40 Coser, LA 103 Cuvillier, Armand 159 d'Arbois de Jubainville, Henri 30. In Stephen P. Turner (ed.), Emile Durkheim: Sociologist and Moralist. Routledge.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. G. Davy, M. A. Arbib, V. Aubert, John Austin, M. Bach, Francis Bacon, C. R. Badcock, H. E. Barnes, Robert N. Bellah & R. Bendix (1993). Cuvillier, Armand 166 d'Arbois de Jubainville, Henri 33 Darwin, Charles 114 Daudet, Léon 41. In Stephen P. Turner (ed.), Emile Durkheim: Sociologist and Moralist. Routledge.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Kent Bach, Minimalism for Dummies: Reply to Cappelen and Lepore.score: 120.0
    In my commentary on Herman Cappelen and Ernie Lepore’s aptly titled book, Insensitive Semantics, I stake out a middle ground between their version of Semantic Minimalism and Contextualism. My kind of Semantic Minimalism does without the “minimal propositions” posited by C&L. It allows that some sentences do not express propositions, even relative to contexts. Instead, they are semantically incomplete. It is not a form of contextualism, since being semantically incomplete is not a way of being context-sensitive. In their reply to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Kent Bach, Performatives.score: 120.0
    Paradoxical though it may seem, there are certain things one can do just by saying what one is doing. This is possible if one uses a verb that names the very sort of act one is performing. Thus one can thank someone by saying 'Thank you', fire someone by saying 'You're fired', and apologize by saying 'I apologize'. These are examples of 'explicit performative utterances', statements in form but not in fact. Or so thought their discoverer, J. L. Austin, who (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Kent Bach, From the Strange to the Bizarre: Another Reply to Cappelen and Lepore.score: 120.0
    If you think that semantic minimalism is the only alternative to contextualism but you’d rather do without Cappelen and Lepore’s mysteriously minimal “propositions,” you can. You just have to recognize that being semantically incomplete does not make a sentence context-sensitive. You don’t have to go through the ritual of repeatedly incanting things like this: “John is ready” expresses the proposition that John is ready. Instead, you can opt for Radical Minimalism and suppose that “John is ready” and its ilk fall (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore, Kent Bach on Minimalism for Dummies.score: 54.0
    According to Kent Bach (forthcoming), our book, Insensitive Semantics (IS), suffers from its 'implicit endorsement' of (1): (1) Every complete sentence expresses a proposition (this is Propositionalism, a fancy version of the old grammar school dictum that every complete sentence expresses a complete thought) (Bach (ms.)) In response (C&L, forthcoming), we claim to be unaware of endorsing (1). No argument in IS depends on (1), we say. We don't claim to have shown that that there couldn't be grammatical (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Philippe Charru (2012). Un théologien à l'écoute de la musique. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 68 (2):311-318.score: 54.0
    Philippe Charru | Résumé : Christoph Theobald travaille depuis de longues années en tant que théologien sur l’oeuvre de Jean-Sébastien Bach, en collaboration avec un musicien. On tente de faire entendre ici comment sa « manière de faire de la théologie », soucieuse de respecter l’autonomie des arts, le rend attentif à la réalité sensible des oeuvres musicales et à une conception génétique de leur forme où se profile « l’opération même du style », selon le mot de Merleau-Ponty. (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Lynsey Wolter (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Demonstratives in Philosophy and Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):108-111.score: 43.0
    Demonstrative noun phrases (e.g. this; that guy over there ) are intimately connected to the context of use in that their reference is determined by demonstrations and/or the speaker's intentions. The semantics of demonstratives therefore has important implications not only for theories of reference, but for questions about how information from the context interacts with formal semantics. First treated by Kaplan as directly referential , demonstratives have recently been analyzed as quantifiers by King, and the choice between these two approaches (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Bernard Sève (2011). Utilisation et « présentation esthétique » des instruments de musique. Methodos 11.score: 36.0
    J’appelle « présentation esthétique » le fait, pour un artiste, de présenter certaines conditions ou certains moyens de son art dans les formes même de son art, de manière sensible (« esthétique ») et non pas discursive. Dans certaines œuvres, le musicien présente esthétiquement certains instruments de musique : l’instrument n’est plus seulement au service de la musique, il est mis en avant pour lui-même. La musique devient alors l’instrument de son instrument. J’analyse de ce point de vue les Six (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Zoltán Gendler Szabó (ed.) (2005). Semantics Vs. Pragmatics. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Leading scholars in the philosophy of language and theoretical linguistics present brand-new papers on a major topic at the intersection of the two fields, the distinction between semantics and pragmatics. Anyone engaged with this issue in either discipline will find much to reward their attention here. Contributors: Kent Bach, Herman Cappelen, Michael Glanzberg, Jeffrey C. King, Ernie Lepore, Stephen Neale, F. Recanati, Nathan Salmon, Mandy Simons, Scott Soames, Robert J. Stainton, Jason Stanley, Zoltan Gendler Szabo.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Mark Siebel (2003). Illocutionary Acts and Attitude Expression. Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (3):351-366.score: 24.0
    In the classic Linguistic Communication and Speech Acts,Kent Bach and Robert M. Harnish advocated the idea that to perform an illocutionary actoften just means to express certain attitudes. The underlying definition of attitudeexpression, however, gives rise to serious problems because it requires intentions of a peculiarkind. Recently, Wayne Davis has proposed a different analysis of attitude expression whichis not subject to these difficulties and thus promises a more plausible account of illocutions.It will be shown, however, that this account (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2006). Replies. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):469–492.score: 24.0
    Symposium on Insensitive Semantics. Replies to Kent Bach, John Hawthorne, Kepa Korta and John Perry, and Robert J. Stainton.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Paul Bach-Y.-Rita & Gaetano L. Aiello (2001). Brain Energetics and Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):280-281.score: 24.0
    The human brain does not use more energy than the smaller brains of animals of comparable corporal weight. Uniquely, human functions localized largely in parts of the human brain that show greatest size increase over other animals may be mediated primarily by nonsynaptic neurotransmission, with reduced energy cost per kilogram of brain. This may affect the energetic constraints on evolution.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Zoltan Szabo (ed.) (2005). Semantics Versus Pragmatics. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Leading scholars in the philosophy of language and theoretical linguistics present brand-new papers on a major topic at the intersection of the two fields, the distinction between semantics and pragmatics. Anyone engaged with this issue in either discipline will find much to reward their attention here. Contributors: Kent Bach, Herman Cappelen, Michael Glanzberg, Jeffrey C. King, Ernie Lepore, Stephen Neale, F. Recanati, Nathan Salmon, Mandy Simons, Scott Soames, Robert J. Stainton, Jason Stanley, Zoltan Gendler Szabo.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Henrik Lübker (2012). The Method of In-Between in the Grotesque and the Works of Leif Lage. Continent 2 (3):170-181.score: 24.0
    “Artworks are not being but a process of becoming” —Theodor W. Adorno, Aesthetic Theory In the everyday use of the concept, saying that something is grotesque rarely implies anything other than saying that something is a bit outside of the normal structure of language or meaning – that something is a peculiarity. But in its historical use the concept has often had more far reaching connotations. In different phases of history the grotesque has manifested its forms as a means of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. N. L. Wilson (1972). What Exactlyis English? Journal of Philosophical Logic 1 (2):170 - 183.score: 12.0
    I wish now to return to the elementary characterization of languagehood in section III and its rationalization in section IV and say something by way of conclusion. The account given may or may not have a large number of fascinating and important consequences, but I shall confine myself to a couple of minor points and one not so minor.Let us suppose that there are either an infinite number of extra-linguistic entities (which seems plausible) or an infinite number of possible expressions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert C. Trundle (2009). Women's Fashion. Cultura 6 (2):46-67.score: 12.0
    A perennial influence on the aesthetics of fashion, fostered by Plato and Aristotle, is challenged today by a prevalent social constructionism. The latter embraces an impracticable biodenial as well as an incoherent epistemic relativism, reminiscent of Greek Sophism, whereby truth-claims about good fashion may be both true and false either in the same culture at different times or at the same time in different cultures. But a normative aesthetics of Aristotle and Plato, that affirms an epistemic realism, roots women's fashion (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Robert Love (2010). The Great Oom: The Improbable Birth of Yoga in America. Viking.score: 12.0
    Preface -- Prologue: A man in love with beauty -- First son of a first son -- Kali Mudra -- Tantrik nights -- Downfall and disgrace -- What is this man? -- Yoga at large -- Partners -- Expansion -- For love & money -- The Promised Land -- Welcome to Nyack -- Interrogation -- Body and mind -- Enter Sir Paul -- Bach, baseball & Buddha -- The Vanderbilt knot -- The show goes on -- Blue skies, big (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Robert Levin (2011). Text and the Volatility of Spontaneous Performance. Common Knowledge 17 (2):247-268.score: 12.0
    Comparison of surviving texts of eighteenth-century composers, Bach and Mozart in particular, show that considerable latitude was granted to performers for extempore embellishment and cadenzas, not only in arias and concertos but in solo works as well. Amateurs required prepared elaborations, whereas professional performers did not. The aesthetic of improvisation in performance is shot through with risk—an element sadly lacking in the training and the performance of classical music at the present time. This article finds distinct parallels among what (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation