5 found
Sort by:
  1. Robert L. Burgess & Peter C. M. Molenaar (2007). Evolutionary Theory and the Social Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):20-21.
    Gintis's article is an example of growing awareness by social scientists of the significance of evolutionary theory for understanding human nature. Although we share its main point of view, we comment on some disagreements related to levels of behavioral analysis, the explanation of social cooperation, and the ubiquity of inter-individual differences in human decision-making. (Published Online April 27 2007).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert L. Burgess & Alicia A. Drais (1999). Beyond the “Cinderella Effect”. Human Nature 10 (4):373-398.
    A central thesis of this paper is that understanding the nature of child maltreatment is so complex that no one disciplinary specialty is likely to be sufficient for the task. Although life history theory is the guiding principle for our analysis, we argue that an evolutionary explanation adds precision by incorporating empirical findings originating from the fields of anthropology; clinical, developmental, and social psychology; and sociology. Although evolutionary accounts of child maltreatment have been largely limited to the role of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Robert L. Burgess (1994). The Family in a Changing World. Human Nature 5 (2):203-221.
    Increasing numbers of young mothers in the work force, more and more children requiring extrafamilial care, high rates of divorce, lower rates of remarriage, increasing numbers of female-headed households, growing numbers of zero-parent families, and significant occurrences of child maltreatment are just some of the social indicators indicative of the family in a changing world. These trends and their consequences for children are described and then examined from the perspectives of microeconomic theory, the relative-income hypothesis, sex-ratio theory, and one form (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robert L. Burgess (1987). Jungle Expansion. BioScience 37 (3):174-174.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Robert L. Burgess (1969). Plant Growth Papers on Plant Growth and Development W. M. Laetsch R. E. Cleland. BioScience 19 (4):379-380.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation