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  1. Loet Leydesdorff, Robert L. Goldstone & Thomas Schank (forthcoming). Betweenness Centrality and the Interdisciplinarity of Cognitive Science. Cognitive Science.
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  2. Amy Needham, Robert L. Goldstone & Sarah E. Wiesen (2014). Learning Visual Units After Brief Experience in 10‐Month‐Old Infants. Cognitive Science 38 (7):1507-1519.
    How does perceptual learning take place early in life? Traditionally, researchers have focused on how infants make use of information within displays to organize it, but recently, increasing attention has been paid to the question of how infants perceive objects differently depending upon their recent interactions with the objects. This experiment investigates 10-month-old infants' use of brief prior experiences with objects to visually organize a display consisting of multiple geometrically shaped three-dimensional blocks created for this study. After a brief exposure (...)
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  3. Fabien Mathy, Harry H. Haladjian, Eric Laurent & Robert L. Goldstone (2013). Similarity-Dissimilarity Competition in Disjunctive Classification Tasks. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  4. Thomas N. Wisdom, Xianfeng Song & Robert L. Goldstone (2013). Social Learning Strategies in Networked Groups. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1383-1425.
    When making decisions, humans can observe many kinds of information about others' activities, but their effects on performance are not well understood. We investigated social learning strategies using a simple problem-solving task in which participants search a complex space, and each can view and imitate others' solutions. Results showed that participants combined multiple sources of information to guide learning, including payoffs of peers' solutions, popularity of solution elements among peers, similarity of peers' solutions to their own, and relative payoffs from (...)
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  5. Ji Y. Son, Linda B. Smith, Robert L. Goldstone & Michelle Leslie (2012). The Importance of Being Interpreted: Grounded Words and Children's Relational Reasoning. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Although young children typically have trouble reasoning relationally, they are aided by the presence of relational words (e.g., Gentner & Rattermann, 1991). They also reason well about commonly experienced event structures (e.g., Fivush, 1984). Relational words may benefit relational reasoning because they activate well-understood event structures. Two candidate hypotheses were tested: (1) the Schema hypothesis, according to which words help relational reasoning because they are grounded in schematized experiences and (2) the Optimal Vagueness hypothesis, by which words benefit relational reasoning (...)
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  6. Robert L. Goldstone, David Landy & Lionel C. Brunel (2011). Improving Perception to Make Distant Connections Closer. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  7. William Bechtel, Marlene Behrmann, Nick Chater, Robert J. Glushko, Robert L. Goldstone & Paul Smolensky (2010). The Rumelhart Prize at 10. Cognitive Science 34 (5):713-715.
  8. Robert L. Goldstone & David Landy (2010). Domain-Creating Constraints. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1357-1377.
    The contributions to this special issue on cognitive development collectively propose ways in which learning involves developing constraints that shape subsequent learning. A learning system must be constrained to learn efficiently, but some of these constraints are themselves learnable. To know how something will behave, a learner must know what kind of thing it is. Although this has led previous researchers to argue for domain-specific constraints that are tied to different kinds/domains, an exciting possibility is that kinds/domains themselves can be (...)
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  9. Robert L. Goldstone, David H. Landy & Ji Y. Son (2010). The Education of Perception. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (2):265-284.
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  10. Andrew T. Hendrickson, George Kachergis, Todd M. Gureckis & Robert L. Goldstone (2010). Is Categorical Perception Really Verbally Mediated Perception? In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  11. Georg Theiner, Colin Allen & Robert L. Goldstone (2010). Recognizing Group Cognition. Cognitive Systems Research 11 (4):378-395.
    In this paper, we approach the idea of group cognition from the perspective of the “extended mind” thesis, as a special case of the more general claim that systems larger than the individual human, but containing that human, are capable of cognition (Clark, 2008; Clark & Chalmers, 1998). Instead of deliberating about “the mark of the cognitive” (Adams & Aizawa, 2008), our discussion of group cognition is tied to particular cognitive capacities. We review recent studies of group problem-solving and group (...)
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  12. Samuel B. Day & Robert L. Goldstone (2009). Analogical Transfer From Interaction with a Simulated Physical System. In. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 1406--1411.
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  13. Robert L. Goldstone & Todd M. Gureckis (2009). Collective Behavior. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):412-438.
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  14. Todd M. Gureckis & Robert L. Goldstone (2009). How You Named Your Child: Understanding the Relationship Between Individual Decision Making and Collective Outcomes. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (4):651-674.
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  15. Ji Y. Son & Robert L. Goldstone (2009). Fostering General Transfer with Specific Simulations. Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (1):1-42.
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  16. Todd M. Gureckis & Robert L. Goldstone (2008). The Effect of the Internal Structure of Categories on Perception. In. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. 1876--1881.
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  17. Ji Y. Son, Linda B. Smith & Robert L. Goldstone (2008). Simplicity and Generalization: Short-Cutting Abstraction in Children's Object Categorizations. Cognition 108 (3):626-638.
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  18. T. Hills, Peter M. Todd & Robert L. Goldstone (2007). Priming and Conservation Between Spatial and Cognitive Search. In. In McNamara D. S. & Trafton J. G. (eds.), Proceedings of the 29th Annual Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. 359--364.
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  19. Robert L. Goldstone & Loet Leydesdorff (2006). The Import and Export of Cognitive Science. Cognitive Science 30 (6):983-993.
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  20. Robert L. Goldstone & Michael E. Roberts (2006). Self‐Organized Trail Systems in Groups of Humans. Complexity 11 (6):43-50.
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  21. Todd M. Gureckis & Robert L. Goldstone (2006). Thinking in Groups. Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (2):293-311.
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  22. Robert L. Goldstone (2005). Returning to a New Home. Cognitive Science 29 (1):1-4.
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  23. Robert L. Goldstone & Marco A. Janssen (2005). Computational Models of Collective Behavior. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):424-430.
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  24. Robert L. Goldstone & Marco A. Janssen (2005). Questions for Future Research. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):424-430.
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  25. Robert L. Goldstone, Steven A. Sloman, David A. Lagnado, Mark Steyvers, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Saskia Jaarsveld, Cees van Leeuwen, Murray Shanahan, Terry Dartnall & Simon Dennis (2005). Subject Index to Volume 29. Cognitive Science 29:1093-1096.
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  26. Robert L. Goldstone, John R. Anderson, Nick Chater, Andy Clark, Shimon Edelman, Kenneth Forbus, Dedre Gentner, Raymond W. Gibbs Jr, James Greeno & Robert A. Jacobs (2004). Journal of The Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science 28 (3).
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  27. Robert L. Goldstone (2003). Do We All Look Alike to Computers? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):55-57.
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  28. Robert L. Goldstone, Yvonne Lippa & Richard M. Shiffrin (2001). Altering Object Representations Through Category Learning. Cognition 78 (1):27-43.
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  29. Robert L. Goldstone & Mark Steyvers (2001). The Sensitization and Differentiation of Dimensions During Category Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (1):116.
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  30. Phillipe G. Schyns, Robert L. Goldstone & Jean-Pierre Thibaut (2001). Functional Identification of Constraints on Feature Creation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1147-1148.
    Dawson's provocative comment makes three connected points: (1) to be falsifiable, theories that assume flexible features must constrain their feature creation and mechanisms, (2) the explanatory power of such functional theories is rooted in the properties of their underlying physical mechanisms, and (3) to derive the relevant constraints of feature creation from these mechanisms, it is critical to avoid the scope slip. We will argue here that even though we agree with (1) and (2), (3) confuses two different levels of (...)
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  31. Robert L. Goldstone (1998). Objects, Please Remain Composed. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):472-473.
    The holistic representation of objects as coordinates in a psychological space should be supplemented with decompositional processes that break objects down into components. There is strong psychological evidence for object decomposition, and structured representations are also needed because of their computational efficiency. Structured and unstructured representations can be unified by a process that extracts regularities at multiple levels of an object.
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  32. Robert L. Goldstone & Lawrence W. Barsalou (1998). Reuniting Perception and Conception. Cognition 65 (2-3):231-262.
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  33. Philippe G. Schyns, Robert L. Goldstone & Jean-Pierre Thibaut (1998). The Development of Features in Object Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):1-17.
    According to one productive and influential approach to cognition, categorization, object recognition, and higher level cognitive processes operate on a set of fixed features, which are the output of lower level perceptual processes. In many situations, however, it is the higher level cognitive process being executed that influences the lower level features that are created. Rather than viewing the repertoire of features as being fixed by low-level processes, we present a theory in which people create features to subserve the representation (...)
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  34. Philippe G. Schyns, Robert L. Goldstone & Jean-Pierre Thibaut (1998). Ways of Featuring in Object Categorization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):41-54.
    The origin of features from nonfeatural information is a problem that should concern all theories of object categorization and recognition, not just the flexible feature approach. In contrast to the idea that new features must originate from combinations of simpler fixed features, we argue that holistic features can be created from a direct imprinting on the visual medium. Furthermore, featural descriptions can emerge from processes that by themselves do not operate on feature detectors. Once acquired, features can be decomposed into (...)
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  35. Robert L. Goldstone, Mark Steyvers & Kenneth Larimer (1996). Categorical Perception of Novel Dimensions. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 243--248.
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  36. Rachel Pevtzow & Robert L. Goldstone (1994). Categorization and the Parsing of Objects. In. In Ashwin Ram & Kurt Eiselt (eds.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Erlbaum. 717--722.
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  37. J. David Smith, Deborah G. Kemler, Lisa A. Grohskopf Nelson, Terry Appleton, Mary K. Mullen, Judy S. Deloache, Nancy M. Burns, Kevin B. Korb, Robert L. Goldstone & Jean E. Andruski (1994). STEVEN A. SLOMAN (Brown University, Providence) When Explanations Compete: The Role of Explanatory Coherence on Judgements of Likelihood, 1-21. Cognition 52 (251):251.
     
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