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Robert Larmer [22]Robert A. Larmer [17]Robert A. H. Larmer [1]
  1. Robert Larmer (forthcoming). Miracles as Evidence for the Existence of God: A Response to Frank Jankunis. Dialogue:1-12.
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  2. Robert A. Larmer (forthcoming). Christian Anthropology: Saving the Soul? Philosophia Christi.
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  3. Robert A. Larmer (forthcoming). Is Methodological Naturalism Question-Begging? Philosophia Christi.
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  4. Robert Larmer (2014). Divine Intervention and the Conservation of Energy: A Reply to Evan Fales. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (1):27-38.
    Evan Fales has recently argued that, although I provide the most promising approach for those concerned to defend belief in divine intervention, I nevertheless fail to show that such belief can be rational. I argue that Fales’ objections are unsuccessful.
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  5. Robert A. Larmer (2013). The Legitimacy of Miracle. Lexington Books.
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  6. Robert A. Larmer (2011). 2 The Meanings of Miracle. In Graham H. Twelftree (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Miracles. Cambridge Up. 36.
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  7. Robert A. Larmer (2010). Thomas Holden Spectres of False Divinity: Hume's Moral Atheism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010). Pp. Xiii+ 246.£ 35.00, $55.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 957994 5. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 46 (4):541-545.
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  8. Robert Larmer (2009). Divine Agency and the Principle of the Conservation of Energy. Zygon 44 (3):543-557.
    Many contemporary thinkers seeking to integrate theistic belief and scientific thought reject what they regard as two extremes. They disavow deism in which God is understood simply to uphold the existence of the physical universe, and they exclude any view of divine influence that suggests the performance of physical work through an immaterial cause. Deism is viewed as theologically inadequate, and acceptance of direct immaterial causation of physical events is viewed as scientifically illegitimate. This desire to avoid both deism and (...)
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  9. Robert A. Larmer (2009). Interpreting Hume on Miracles. Religious Studies 45 (3):325-338.
    Contemporary commentators on Hume’s essay, "Of Miracles" have increasingly tended to argue that Hume never intended to suggest that testimonial evidence must always be insufficient to justify belief in a miracle. This is in marked contrast to earlier commentators who interpreted Hume as intending to demonstrate that testimonial evidence is incapable in principle of ever establishing rational belief in a miracle. In this article I argue that this traditional interpretation is the correct one.
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  10. Robert Larmer (2008). C. S. Lewis's Critique of Hume's “on Miracles”. Faith and Philosophy 25 (2):154-171.
    In this article I argue that C. S. Lewis is both a perceptive reader and trenchant critic of David Hume’s views on miracle.
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  11. Robert A. Larmer (2008). Miracles, Physicalism, and the Laws of Nature. Religious Studies 44 (2):149-159.
    In his paper "Miracles: Metaphysics, Physics, and Physicalism," Kirk McDermid appears to have two primary goals. The first is to demonstrate that my account of how God might produce a miracle without violating any laws of nature is radically flawed. The second is to suggest two alternative accounts, one suitable for a deterministic world, one suitable for an indeterministic world, which allow for the occurrence of a miracle without violation of the laws of nature, yet do not suffer from the (...)
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  12. Robert Larmer (2005). Peter van Inwagen, Ed., Christian Faith and the Problem of Evil Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (4):306-307.
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  13. Robert Larmer (2004). Miracles and Overall: An Apology for Atheism? Dialogue 43 (3):555-568.
    Christian Overall and I have been debating whether the occurrence of events traditionally viewed as miracles would constitute evidence for theism. In this article, I make some concluding comments regarding our exchanges. My goal in making these comments is twofold. First, I wish to sketch why I think miracles can function as evidence for God. Second, in the course of our discussion, Overall has ascribed to me claims that I do not make and criticized me on the basis of my (...)
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  14. Susan Tridgell, Reg Naulty, Robert Larmer, Jennifer Welchman, Struan Jacobs, Christopher Lundgren, Adrian Walsh, John Makeham & Muhammad Kamal (2004). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Sophia 43 (2):129-147.
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  15. Robert Larmer (2003). Miracles, Evidence, and God. Dialogue 42 (01):107-.
    In "Miracles as Evidence Against the Existence of God," (’Southern Journal of Philosophy’, 1985) Christine Overall argued that the occurrence of miracles would constitute evidence against the existence of God, on the grounds that miracles are violations of natural law or permanently inexplicable events and, as such, would be inconsistent with the supposed purposes of God. In ’Water Into Wine?’ (MacGill-Queen’s, 1988), I argued that her argument fails once a more adequate definition of miracle is adopted. In "Miracles and God: (...)
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  16. Robert Larmer (2002). Is There Anything Wrong with ``God of the Gaps'' Reasoning? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 52 (3):129-142.
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  17. Robert Larmer (2001). The Ethics of the New Economy Leo Groarke, Editor Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1998, X + 332 Pp., $29.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 40 (01):193-.
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  18. Robert Larmer (2001). The Ethics of the New Economy. Dialogue 40 (1):193-193.
     
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  19. Robert Larmer (1999). God and Argument. Univ Ottawa Pr.
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  20. Robert Larmer (1999). Miracles As Evidence for God. In God and Argument. Univ Ottawa Pr.
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  21. Robert Larmer (1998). Mysticism and Vocation James R. Horne Editions SR, Vol. 18 Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1996, Vi + 110 Pp., $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 37 (03):637-.
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  22. Robert Larmer (1998). Mysticism and Vocation. Dialogue 37 (3):637-638.
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  23. Robert A. Larmer (1998). Questions of Miracle. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (3):189 - 190.
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  24. Robert Larmer (1997). The Ethics of Investing: A Reply to William Irvine. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (4):397-400.
    In a recent article in this journal entitled "The Ethics of Investing", William Irvine argues that what he calls the 'Evil-Company Principle' is an inadequate guide to ethical investing. In its place, he proposes what he calls the 'Enablement Principle'. In reply, I argue that his rejection of the Evil-Company Principle is premature and that his Enablement Principle presupposes acceptance of the Evil-Company Principle.
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  25. Robert A. Larmer (1997). Miracles, Evil and Justified Belief: Some Final Comments. Sophia 36 (2):79 - 87.
    The following section of this message contains a file attachment prepared for transmission using the Internet MIME message format. If you are using Pegasus Mail, or any another MIME-compliant system, you should be able to save it or view it from within your mailer. If you cannot, please ask your system administrator for assistance.
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  26. Robert Larmer (1996). Corporate Executives: Disasters and Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (7):785 - 788.
    In his article The Moral Responsibility of Corporate Executives for Disasters, John Bishop has argued that we are justified on moral considerations for holding corporate executives responsible for disasters resulting from corporate activities, even in circumstances where they could not reasonably have been expected to possess the information necessary to avert these disasters. I argue that he is mistaken in this claim.
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  27. Robert Larmer (1995). Robert Kane, Through the Moral Maze: Searching for Absolute Values in a Pluralistic World Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (5):335-337.
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  28. Robert Larmer (1995). Abortion, Personhood and the Potential for Consciousness. Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (3):241-251.
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  29. Robert Larmer (1992). Donald Wiebe, The Irony of Theology and the Nature of Religious Thought Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (2):148-150.
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  30. Robert A. Larmer (1992). Whistleblowing and Employee Loyalty. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (2):125 - 128.
    Discussions of whistleblowing and employee loyalty usually assume either that the concept of loyalty is irrelevant to the issue or, more commonly, that whistleblowing involves a moral choice in which the loyalty that an employee owes an employer comes to be pitted against the employee''s responsibility to serve public interest. I argue that both these views are mistaken and propose a third view which sees whistleblowing as entirely compatible with employee loyalty.
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  31. Robert A. H. Larmer (1992). Miracles and Conservation Laws: A Reply to Professor MacGill. Sophia 31 (1-2):89 - 95.
    In a recent article, Neil MacGill criticizes my claim (See "Water Into Wine", MacGill-Queen’s University Press, 1988) that miracles, understood as a transcendent agent overriding the usual course of nature, can conceivably occur without violating or suspending any of the laws of nature. MacGill feels that my account of miracles implies the violation of at least one law of nature, the Principle of the Conservation of Energy. In my reply, I point out that he is mistaken and that my original (...)
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  32. Robert A. Larmer (1991). Kelly James Clark, Return to Reason Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (2):96-97.
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  33. Robert A. Larmer (1989). Miracles and Natural Explanations: A Rejoinder. Sophia 28 (3):7 - 12.
    IN HIS ARTICLE "MIRACLES AND NATURAL EXPLANATION" DAVID BASINGER TAKES ISSUE WITH THE CLAIM I ADVANCED IN MY EARLIER ARTICLE "MIRACLES AND CRITERIA" THAT ONLY A DOGMATIC AND UNCRITICAL ASSUMPTION THAT NATURE IS IN FACT AN ISOLATED SYSTEM CAN EXPLAIN THE INSISTENCE OF SOME PHILOSOPHERS THAT, NO MATTER WHAT THE EVENT AND NO MATTER WHAT THE CONTEXT IN WHICH IT OCCURS, IT IS ALWAYS MORE RATIONAL TO LIVE IN THE FAITH THAT SUCH AN EVENT HAS A NATURAL EXPLANATION RATHER THAN (...)
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  34. Robert Larmer (1988). Against 'Against Miracles'. Sophia 27 (1):20 - 25.
    IN HIS RECENT ARTICLE "AGAINST MIRACLES" ("DIALOGUE" 25, 349-352, SUMMER 1986) JOHN COLLIER CRITICIZES MY CLAIM THAT MIRACLES, I.E., OVERRIDINGS OF NATURE BY A TRANSCENDENT AGENT, CAN TAKE PLACE IN A WORLD WHICH BEHAVES COMPLETELY IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAWS OF NATURE ("MIRACLES AND THE LAWS OF NATURE," "DIALOGUE" 24, SUMMER 1985). THE TWO GROUNDS HE GIVES FOR REJECTING MY VIEW ARE (1) THAT I MISUNDERSTAND HUME, AND (2) THAT I MISUNDERSTAND THE PRINCIPLE OF CONSERVATION OF ENERGY. IN REPLY, I (...)
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  35. Robert A. Larmer (1988). Water Into Wine? An Investigation of the Concept of a Miracle. Mcgill-Queen’s University Press.
    In Water into Wine? Robert Larmer re-examines significant issues in this cross-disciplinary debate and attacks two basic assumptions governing it.
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  36. Robert A. Larmer & Free Will (1987). The Range of Epistemic Logic. Philosophia 17 (3):375-390.
  37. Robert A. Larmer (1986). Free Will, Hegemony and Neurophysiological Indeterminism. Philosophia 16 (August):177-189.
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  38. Robert A. Larmer (1986). Mind-Body Interactionism and the Conservation of Energy. International Philosophical Quarterly 26 (September):277-85.
    One of the major reasons underlying the widespread rejection of the theory that the mind is an immaterial substance distinct from the body, But which nevertheless acts on the body, Is that it is felt that such a theory commits one to denying the principle of the conservation of energy. My aim in this article is to assess the strength of this objection. My thesis is that the usual replies are inadequate, But--Strong as this objection appears--Some important logical distinctions have (...)
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  39. Robert A. Larmer (1985). Miracles and the Laws of Nature. Dialogue 24 (2):227 - 235.
    I DEFEND THE VIEW THAT MIRACLES, CONSIDERED AS OBJECTIVE EVENTS SPECIALLY CAUSED BY GOD, CAN CONCEIVABLY OCCUR IN A WORLD WHICH BEHAVES, ALWAYS AND EVERYWHERE, COMPLETELY IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAWS OF NATURE. GOD, BY CREATING OR ANNIHILATING UNITS OR MASS/ENERGY AND THUS ALTERING THE MATERIAL CONDITIONS TO WHICH THE LAWS APPLY, CAN PRODUCE A MIRACLE WITHOUT VIOLATING ANY OF THE LAWS OF NATURE.
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  40. Robert Larmer (1984). Miracles and Criteria. Sophia 23 (1):5 - 12.
    IN "MIRACLES AND CRITERIA" I ARGUE THAT, CONTRARY TO VIEWS OF PHILOSOPHERS SUCH AS GUY ROBINSON, THERE EXIST CRITERIA BY WHICH TO DIFFERENTIATE EVENTS LEGITIMATELY TERMED MIRACLES AND EVENTS BEST INTERPRETED AS MERE INDICES OF AN INADEQUATE UNDERSTANDING OF NATURAL PROCESSES. WHETHER ONE VIEWS AN EXTRAORDINARY EVENT AS A MIRACLE OR AS THE RESULT OF SOME UNKNOWN OR POORLY UNDERSTOOD NATURAL PROCESSES IS NOT, THEREFORE, A MATTER OF WHIM.
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