28 found
Sort by:
  1. Caspar Addyman & Robert M. French (2012). Computational Modeling in Cognitive Science: A Manifesto for Change. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):332-341.
    Computational modeling has long been one of the traditional pillars of cognitive science. Unfortunately, the computer models of cognition being developed today have not kept up with the enormous changes that have taken place in computer technology and, especially, in human-computer interfaces. For all intents and purposes, modeling is still done today as it was 25, or even 35, years ago. Everyone still programs in his or her own favorite programming language, source code is rarely made available, accessibility of models (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert M. French (2008). A New Manifesto for Child Development Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):339-340.
    This book is an excellent manifesto for future work in child development. It presents a multidisciplinary approach that clearly demonstrates the value of integrating modeling, neuroscience, and behavior to explore the mechanisms underlying development and to show how internal context-dependent representations arise and are modified during development. Its only major flaw is to have given short shrift to the study of the role of genetics on development.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Robert M. French (2008). Relational Priming is to Analogy-Making as One-Ball Juggling is to Seven-Ball Juggling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):386-387.
    Relational priming is argued to be a deeply inadequate model of analogy-making because of its intrinsic inability to do analogies where the base and target domains share no common attributes and the mapped relations are different. Leech et al. rely on carefully handcrafted representations to allow their model to make a complex analogy, seemingly unaware of the debate on this issue fifteen years ago. Finally, they incorrectly assume the existence of fixed, context-independent relations between objects.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robert M. French & Maud Jacquet (2004). All Cases of Word Production Are Not Created Equal: Reply to Costa and Santesteban. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):254.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Robert M. French & Maud Jacquet (2004). Understanding Bilingual Memory: Models and Data. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):87-93.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Boicho Kokinov & Robert M. French (2003). Computational Models of Analogy-Making. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group. 1--113.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Robert M. French (2002). Implicit Learning and Consciousness: An Empirical, Philosophical, and Computational Consensus in the Making. Psychology Press.
    Implicit Learning and Consciousness challenges conventional wisdom and presents the most up-to-date studies to define, quantify and test the predictions of the main models of implicit learning. The chapters include a variety of research from computer modeling, experimental psychology and neural imaging to the clinical data resulting from work with amnesics. The result is a topical book that provides an overview of the debate on implicit learning, and the various philosophical, psychological and neurological frameworks in which it can be placed. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert M. French (2002). Natura Non Facit Saltum: The Need for the Full Continuum of Mental Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):339-340.
    Natura non facit saltum (Nature does not make leaps) was the lovely aphorism on which Darwin based his work on evolution. It applies as much to the formation of mental representations as to the formation of species, and therein lies our major disagreement with the SOC model proposed by Perruchet & Vinter.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert M. French (2002). The Computational Modeling of Analogy-Making. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (5):200-205.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert M. French & Axel Cleeremans (eds.) (2002). Implicit Learning and Consciousness: An Empirical. Psychology Press.
  11. Denis Mareschal, Paul C. Quinn & Robert M. French (2002). Asymmetric Interference in 3‐ to 4‐Month‐Olds' Sequential Category Learning. Cognitive Science 26 (3):377-389.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert M. French & Elizabeth Thomas (2001). The Dynamical Hypothesis in Cognitive Science: A Review Essay of Mind As Motion. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 11 (1):101-111.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Robert M. French (2000). Peeking Behind the Screen: The Unsuspected Power of the Standard Turing Test. Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 12 (3):331-340.
    No computer that had not experienced the world as we humans had could pass a rigorously administered standard Turing Test. We show that the use of “subcognitive” questions allows the standard Turing Test to indirectly probe the human subcognitive associative concept network built up over a lifetime of experience with the world. Not only can this probing reveal differences in cognitive abilities, but crucially, even differences in _physical aspects_ of the candidates can be detected. Consequently, it is unnecessary (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Robert M. French & Elizabeth Thomas (2000). Why Localist Connectionist Models Are Inadequate for Categorization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):477-477.
    Two categorization arguments pose particular problems for localist connectionist models. The internal representations of localist networks do not reflect the variability within categories in the environment, whereas networks with distributed internal representations do reflect this essential feature of categories. We provide a real biological example of perceptual categorization in the monkey that seems to require population coding (i.e., distributed internal representations).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Patrick Anselme & Robert M. French (1999). Interactively Converging on Context-Sensitive Representations: A Solution to the Frame Problem. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 53 (209):365-385.
    While we agree that the frame problem, as initially stated by McCarthy and Hayes (1969), is a problem that arises because of the use of representations, we do not accept the anti-representationalist position that the way around the problem is to eliminate representations. We believe that internal representations of the external world are a necessary, perhaps even a defining feature, of higher cognition. We explore the notion of dynamically created context-dependent representations that emerge from a continual interaction between working memory, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Robert M. French (1999). Constrained Connectionism and the Limits of Human Semantics: A Review Essay of Terry Regier's the Human Semantic Potential. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 12 (4):515 – 523.
    Taking to heart Massaro's [(1988) Some criticisms of connectionist models of human performance, Journal of Memory and Language, 27, 213-234] criticism that multi-layer perceptrons are not appropriate for modeling human cognition because they are too powerful (i.e. they can simulate just about anything, which gives them little explanatory power), Regier develops the notion of constrained connectionism. The model that he discusses is a distributed network but with numerous constraints added that are (more or less) motivated by real psychophysical and neurophysical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jean-Noël Missa, Claude Debru, Joëlle Proust, Pierre Karli, Robert M. French, Patrick Anselme, Axel Cleeremans & John-Dylan Haynes (1999). Comptes Rendus Pierre Daled, Spiritualisme Et Matérialisme au Xixe Siècle (Yves Lepers) 449 J.-C. DuPont, Histoire de la Neurotransmission (Rodolphe Vàn-Wunendaele) 450. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 53:265.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Robert M. French & Elizabeth Thomas (1998). The Dynamical Hypothesis: One Battle Behind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):640-641.
    What new implications does the dynamical hypothesis have for cognitive science? The short answer is: None. The _Behavior and Brain Sciences _target article, “The dynamical hypothesis in cognitive science” by Tim Van Gelder is basically an attack on traditional symbolic AI and differs very little from prior connectionist criticisms of it. For the past ten years, the connectionist community has been well aware of the necessity of using (and understanding) dynamically evolving, recurrent network models of cognition.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Robert M. French & Mark Weaver (1998). New-Feature Learning: How Common is It? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):26-26.
    The fixed-feature viewpoint Schyns et al. are opposing is not a widely held theoretical position but rather a working assumption of cognitive psychologists – and thus a straw man. We accept their demonstration of new-feature acquisition, but question its ubiquity in category learning. We suggest that new-feature learning (at least in adults) is rarer and more difficult than the authors suggest.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Axel Cleeremans & Robert M. French (1996). From Chicken Squawking to Cognition: Levels of Description and the Computational Approach in Psychology. Psychologica Belgica 36:5-29.
  21. Arthur C. Graesser, Cheryl A. Bowers, Tom Trabasso, Brian Harvey, Sunil Cherian, Wade O. Troxell, Timothy Joseph day, Robert M. French, Roger Sansom, Kenneth Aizawa, David Shier, Yakir Levin & Nicholas Power (1996). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 6 (3).
  22. Justin Leiber, Robert M. French, John A. Barnden, Syed S. Ali, Richard Wyatt, Timothy R. Colburn, Brian Harvey, Norman R. Gall, Susan G. Josephson, Francesco Orilia & Achille C. Varzi (1996). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 6 (1):89-129.
  23. Robert M. French (1995). Refocusing the Debate on the Turing Test: A Response. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (1):59-60.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Robert M. French (1995). Refocusing the Debate on the Turing Test: A Reply to Jacquette. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (1):59 - 60.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David J. Chalmers, Robert M. French & Douglas R. Hofstadter (1992). High-Level Perception, Representation, and Analogy:A Critique of Artificial Intelligence Methodology. Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intellige 4 (3):185 - 211.
    High-level perception--”the process of making sense of complex data at an abstract, conceptual level--”is fundamental to human cognition. Through high-level perception, chaotic environmen- tal stimuli are organized into the mental representations that are used throughout cognitive pro- cessing. Much work in traditional artificial intelligence has ignored the process of high-level perception, by starting with hand-coded representations. In this paper, we argue that this dis- missal of perceptual processes leads to distorted models of human cognition. We examine some existing artificial-intelligence models--”notably (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Robert M. French (1990). Subcognition and the Limits of the Turing Test. Mind 99 (393):53-66.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. S. Kaplan, M. Weaver & Robert M. French (1990). Active Symbols and Internal Models: Towards a Cognitive Connectionism. [REVIEW] AI and Society 4 (1):51-71.
    In the first section of the article, we examine some recent criticisms of the connectionist enterprise: first, that connectionist models are fundamentally behaviorist in nature (and, therefore, non-cognitive), and second that connectionist models are fundamentally associationist in nature (and, therefore, cognitively weak). We argue that, for a limited class of connectionist models (feed-forward, pattern-associator models), the first criticism is unavoidable. With respect to the second criticism, we propose that connectionist modelsare fundamentally associationist but that this is appropriate for building models (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Robert M. French (1989). An Analogy Between Western Legal Traditions and Approaches to Artificial Intelligence. AI and Society 3 (3):229-234.