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  1. Robert M. Veatch (forthcoming). An Ethical Framework for Hospital Ethics Committees. Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, Third Edition (Wadsworth Publishing Company, Belmont, California).
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  2. Robert M. Veatch (forthcoming). Justice, the Basic Social Contract and Health Care. Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
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  3. Robert M. Veatch (forthcoming). The Right of Subjects to See the Protocol. Irb.
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  4. Robert M. Veatch (2012). Authority Figures. Hastings Center Report 42 (3):4.
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  5. Robert M. Veatch (2012). Hippocratic, Religious, and Secular Ethics: The Points of Conflict. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):33-43.
    The origins of professional ethical codes and oaths are explored. Their legitimacy and usefulness within the profession are questioned and an alternative ethical source is suggested. This source relies on a commonly shared, naturally knowable set of principles known as common morality.
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  6. Robert M. Veatch (2011). The Not-So-Tell-Tale HeartTo the EditorTo the EditorTo the EditorTo the EditorTo the EditorDon Marquis Replies. Hastings Center Report 41 (2).
    To the Editor: Before using brain criteria, pronouncing death in humans was based on irreversible loss of something vaguely thought of as respiration or circulation or cardiac function. We have always known the loss had to be irreversible. We have also long known that "irreversible" was ambiguous. In his article ("Are DCD Donors Dead?" May-June 2010), Don Marquis captures this ambiguity when he contrasts irreversibility and permanence. Defenders of cardiocirculatory criteria have known that, in some cases, these functions physiologically could (...)
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  7. Robert M. Veatch (2011). The Not‐So‐Tell‐Tale Heart. Hastings Center Report 41 (2):4-5.
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  8. Cheryl C. Macpherson & Robert M. Veatch (2010). Medical Student Attitudes About Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (04):488-496.
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  9. Robert M. Veatch (2010). Case Studies in Biomedical Ethics: Decision-Making, Principles, and Cases. Oxford University Press.
    A model for ethical problem solving -- Values in health and illness -- What is the source of moral judgments? -- Benefiting the patient and others : duty to do good and avoid harm -- Justice : allocation of health resources -- Autonomy -- Veracity : honesty with patients -- Fidelity : promise-keeping, loyalty to patients, and impaired professionals -- Avoidance of killing -- Abortion, sterilization, and contraception -- Genetics, birth, and the biological revolution -- Mental health and behavior control (...)
     
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  10. Robert M. Veatch & Cheryl C. Macpherson (2010). Medical School Oath-Taking: The Moral Controversy. Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):335.
    Professions typically formulate codes of ethics. Medical students are exposed to various codes and often are expected to recite some.
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  11. Robert M. Veatch (2009). Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge. Oxford University Press.
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? -- Abandoning informed (...)
     
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  12. Robert M. Veatch (2009). The Evolution of Death and Dying Controversies. Hastings Center Report 39 (3):16-19.
  13. Robert M. Veatch (2009). The Impending Collapse of the Whole-Brain Definition of Death. In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press. 18-24.
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  14. Robert M. Veatch (2008). Case Studies in Pharmacy Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Every pharmacist, aware or not, is constantly making ethical choices. Sometimes these choices are dramatic, life-and-death decisions, but often they will be more subtle, less conspicuous choices that are nonetheless important. Assisted suicide, conscientious refusal, pain management, equitable and efficacious distribution of drug resources within institutions and managed care plans, confidentiality, and alternative and non-traditional therapies are among the issues that are of unique concern to pharmacists. One way of seeing the implications of such issues and the moral choices they (...)
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  15. Franklin G. Miller & Robert M. Veatch (2007). Symposium on Equipoise and the Ethics of Clinical Trials. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):77 – 78.
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  16. Robert M. Veatch (2007). Is Bioethics Applied Ethics? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (1):1-2.
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  17. Robert M. Veatch (2007). Implied, Presumed and Waived Consent: The Relative Moral Wrongs of Under- and Over-Informing. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):39 – 41.
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  18. Robert M. Veatch (2007). The Irrelevance of Equipoise. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):167 – 183.
    It is commonly believed in research ethics that some form of equipoise is a necessary condition for justifying randomized clinical trials, that without it clinicians are violating the moral duty to do what is best for the patient. Recent criticisms have shown how complex the concept of equipoise is, but often retain the commitment to some form of equipoise for randomization to be justified. This article rejects that claim. It first asks for what one should be equally poised (scientific or (...)
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  19. Susan Dodds, Colin Thomson, Robert M. Veatch, Arthur Caplan, Autumn Fiester, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Ana Smith Iltis, Fabrice Jotterand, Wenmay Rei & Jiunn-Rong Yeh (2006). National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature Selected Citations From the ETHXWeb Database on Bioethics Centers October 17, 2007. Bioethics 20 (6):326-338.
     
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  20. Robert M. Veatch (2006). Character Formation in Professional Education: A Word of Caution. Advances in Bioethics 10:29-45.
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  21. Robert M. Veatch (2006). How Philosophy of Medicine has Changed Medical Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):585 – 600.
    The celebration of thirty years of publication of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provides an opportunity to reflect on how medical ethics has evolved over that period. The reshaping of the field has occurred in no small part because of the impact of branches of philosophy other than ethics. These have included influences from Kantian theory of respect for persons, personal identity theory, philosophy of biology, linguistic analysis of the concepts of health and disease, personhood theory, epistemology, and political (...)
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  22. Robert M. Veatch (2006). Why Researchers Cannot Establish Equipoise. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):55 – 57.
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  23. Timothy F. Murphy & Robert M. Veatch (2005). Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (01):50-59.
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  24. Robert M. Veatch (2005). Disrupted Dialogue: Medical Ethics and the Collapse of Physician-Humanist Communication (1770-1980). Oxford University Press.
    Medical ethics changed dramatically in the past 30 years because physicians and humanists actively engaged each other in discussions that sometimes led to confrontation and controversy, but usually have improved the quality of medical decision-making. Before then medical ethics had been isolated for almost two centuries from the larger philosophical, social, and religious controversies of the time. There was, however, an earlier period where leaders in medicine and in the humanities worked closely together and both fields were richer for it. (...)
     
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  25. Robert M. Veatch (2005). Organs on the Internet. Hastings Center Report 35 (3):6.
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  26. Robert M. Veatch (2005). The Death of Whole-Brain Death: The Plague of the Disaggregators, Somaticists, and Mentalists. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):353 – 378.
    In its October 2001 issue, this journal published a series of articles questioning the Whole-Brain-based definition of death. Much of the concern focused on whether somatic integration - a commonly understood basis for the whole-brain death view - can survive the brain's death. The present article accepts that there are insurmountable problems with whole-brain death views, but challenges the assumption that loss of somatic integration is the proper basis for pronouncing death. It examines three major themes. First, it accepts the (...)
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  27. Robert M. Veatch (2004). Abandon the Dead Donor Rule or Change the Definition of Death? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):261-276.
    : Research by Siminoff and colleagues reveals that many lay people in Ohio classify legally living persons in irreversible coma or persistent vegetative state (PVS) as dead and that additional respondents, although classifying such patients as living, would be willing to procure organs from them. This paper analyzes possible implications of these findings for public policy. A majority would procure organs from those in irreversible coma or in PVS. Two strategies for legitimizing such procurement are suggested. One strategy would be (...)
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  28. Robert M. Veatch (2004). Bonus Allocation Points for Those Willing to Donate Organs. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):1 – 3.
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  29. Robert M. Veatch (2003). Is There a Common Morality? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (3):189-192.
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  30. Robert M. Veatch (2003). The Dead Donor Rule: True by Definition. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):10 – 11.
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  31. Robert M. Veatch (2003). Why Liberals Should Accept Financial Incentives for Organ Procurement. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (1):19-36.
    : Free-market libertarians have long supported incentives to increase organ procurement, but those oriented to justice traditionally have opposed them. This paper presents the reasons why those worried about justice should reconsider financial incentives and tolerate them as a lesser moral evil. After considering concerns about discrimination and coercion and setting them aside, it is suggested that the real moral concern should be manipulation of the neediest. The one offering the incentive (the government) has the resources to eliminate the basic (...)
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  32. Robert M. Veatch (2002). The Birth of Bioethics: Autobiographical Reflections of a Patient Person. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (04):344-352.
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  33. Robert M. Veatch (2002). Indifference of Subjects: An Alternative to Equipoise in Randomized Clinical Trials. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):295-323.
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  34. Robert M. Veatch (2002). Subject Indifference and the Justification of Placebo-Controlled Trials. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):12 – 13.
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  35. Robert M. Veatch (2001). Peter A. Ubel's "Pricing Life". Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (1):108-116.
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  36. Robert M. Veatch (2001). Ethics Consultation: Permission From Patients and Other Problems of Method. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):43-45.
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  37. Robert M. Veatch (2001). Ruth Macklin, Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universal in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):385-392.
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  38. Robert M. Veatch (2001). The Impossibility of a Morality Internal to Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):621 – 642.
    After distinguishing two different meanings of the notion of a morality internal to medicine and considering a hypothetical case of a society that relied on its surgeons to eunuchize priest/cantors to permit them to play an important religious/cultural role, this paper examines three reasons why morality cannot be derived from reflection on the ends of the practice of medicine: (1) there exist many medical roles and these have different ends or purposes, (2) even within any given medical role, there exists (...)
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  39. Robert M. Veatch & Franklin G. Miller (2001). The Internal Morality of Medicine: An Introduction. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):555 – 557.
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  40. Robert M. Veatch (2000). A New Basis for Allocating Livers for Transplant. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (1):75-80.
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  41. Robert M. Veatch (2000). Doctor Does Not Know Best: Why in the New Century Physicians Must Stop Trying to Benefit Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):701 – 721.
    While twentieth-century medical ethics has focused on the duty of physicians to benefit their patients, the next century will see that duty challenged in three ways. First, we will increasingly recognize that it is unrealistic to expect physicians to be able to determine what will benefit their patients. Either they limit their attention to medical well-being when total well-being is the proper end of the patient or they strive for total well-being, which takes them beyond their expertise. Even within the (...)
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  42. Robert M. Veatch (2000). Ruth Macklin, Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universal in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (4):385-392.
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  43. Albert R. Jonsen, Robert M. Veatch, LeRoy Walters & Udo Schuklenk (1999). Booknote-Sourcebook in Bioethics: A Documentary History. Bioethics-Oxford 13 (5):454-455.
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  44. Robert M. Veatch (1999). The Foundations of Bioethics. Bioethics 13 (3-4):206-217.
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  45. Robert M. Veatch (1998). Egalitarian and Maximin Theories of Justice: Directed Donation of Organs for Transplant. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (5):456 – 476.
    It is common to interpret Rawls's maximin theory of justice as egalitarian. Compared to utilitarian theories, this may be true. However, in special cases practices that distribute resources so as to benefit the worst off actually increase the inequality between the worst off and some who are better off. In these cases the Rawlsian maximin parts company with what is here called true egalitarianism. A policy question requiring a distinction between maximin and "true egalitarian" allocations has arisen in the (...)
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  46. Robert M. Veatch (1998). The Place of Care in Ethical Theory. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (2):210 – 224.
    The concept of care and a related ethical theory of care have emerged as increasingly important in biomedical ethics. This essay outlines a series of questions about the conceptualization of care and its place in ethical theory. First, it considers the possibility that care should be conceptualized as an alternative principle of right action; then as a virtue, a cluster of virtues, or as a synonym for virtue theory. The implications for various interpretations of the debate of the relation of (...)
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  47. Robert M. Veatch (1997). Introduction. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (4):vii-x.
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  48. Robert M. Veatch (1997). Single Payers and Multiple Lists: Must Everyone Get the Same Coverage in a Universal Health Plan? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (2):153-169.
    : In spite of recent political setbacks for the movement toward universal health insurance, considerable support remains for the idea. Among those supporting such plans, most assume that a universal insurance system, especially if it is a single-payer system, would offer a single list of basic covered services. This paper challenges that assumption and argues for the availability of multiple lists of services in a universal insurance system. The claim is made that multiple lists will be both more efficient and (...)
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  49. Robert M. Veatch (1997). Who Should Manage Care? The Case for Patients. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (4):391-401.
    : After establishing that it is essential that health care be rationed in some fashion, the paper examines the arguments for and against clinicians as gatekeepers. It first argues that bedside clinicians do not have the information needed to make allocation decisions. Then it claims that physicians at the bedside can be expected to make the wrong choice for two reasons: their commitment to the Hippocratic ethic forces them to pursue the patient's best interest (even when resources will produce only (...)
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  50. Robert M. Veatch (1996). Modern Vs. Contemporary Medicine: The Patient-Provider Relation in the Twenty- First Century. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):366-370.
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