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  1. Robert Merrihew Adams (2015). Comments on Intelligent Virtue: Moral Education, Aspiration, and Altruism. Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (1-2):289-295.
    I am here to criticize a very good book. Julia Annas’s Intelligent Virtue offers us “an account of virtue” that is manifestly indebted to Aristotle and the ancient Stoics, but is also modern and highly original, deeply and carefully thought through, with well-informed attention to contemporary issues and insights. She says “[this] account of virtue results from attending to two ideas” . I will discuss the first of them in parts 1 and 2 of my comments, and the second in (...)
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  2. Robert Merrihew Adams (2013). Consciousness, Physicalism, and Panpsychism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):728-735.
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  3. Robert Merrihew Adams (2010). A Theory of Virtue: Introductory Remarks. Philosophical Studies 148 (1):133 - 134.
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  4. Robert Merrihew Adams (2010). A Theory of Virtue: Response to Critics. Philosophical Studies 148 (1):159 - 165.
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  5. Robert Merrihew Adams (2010). Continuity and Development of Leibniz's Metaphysics of Body. The Leibniz Review 20:51-71.
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  6. Robert Merrihew Adams (2010). Continuity and Development of Leibniz’s Metaphysics of Body: A Response to Daniel Garber’s Leibniz: Body, Substance, Monad. [REVIEW] The Leibniz Review 20:51-71.
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  7. Robert Merrihew Adams (2009). A Philosophical Autobiography. In Samuel Newlands & Larry M. Jorgensen (eds.), Metaphysics and the Good: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams. Oxford University Press
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  8. Robert Merrihew Adams (2009). Conflict. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 83 (1):115-132.
    The following theses are defended. Conflict has importantly valuable functions, but we obviously need to limit its destructiveness. The efficacy of reasoning together in resolving or restraining conflict is limited; it needs to be supplemented by procedures such as negotiation, compromise, and voting. Despite the urgency of justice, when the resolution or limitation of a conflict needs to be negotiated, the best attainable outcome will often not seem completely just to all parties, and some claims of justice, as seen by (...)
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  9. Robert Merrihew Adams (2009). I-Conflict. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 83 (1):115-132.
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  10. Robert Merrihew Adams (2009). Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 19:113-116.
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  11. Robert Merrihew Adams (2009). The Theological Ethics of the Young Rawls and Its Background. In JohnHG Rawls (ed.), A Brief Inquiry Into the Meaning of Sin and Faith: With "on My Religion". Harvard University Press 24-102.
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  12. Robert Merrihew Adams (2008). G. W Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 18:135-137.
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  13. Robert Merrihew Adams (2008). G. W Leibniz: Richerche generali sull’analisi delle nozioni e dell verità e altri scritti di logica. [REVIEW] The Leibniz Review 18:135-137.
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  14. Robert Merrihew Adams (2006). A Theory of Virtue: Excellence in Being for the Good. Clarendon Press.
    The distinguished philosopher Robert M. Adams presents a major work on virtue, which is once again a central topic in ethical thought. A Theory of Virtue is a systematic, comprehensive framework for thinking about the moral evaluation of character, proposing that virtue is chiefly a matter of being for what is good, and that virtues must be intrinsically excellent and not just beneficial or useful.
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  15. Robert Merrihew Adams (2006). Divine Motivation Theory. Linda Zagzebski. Cambridge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):493–497.
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  16. Robert Merrihew Adams (2006). Divine Motivation Theory. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):493-497.
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  17. Robert Merrihew Adams (2006). Love and the Problem of Evil. Philosophia 34 (3):243-251.
    The focus of this paper is the virtual certainty that much of what we must prize in loving any human person would not have existed in a world that did not contain much of the evil that has occurred in the history of the actual world. It is argued that the appropriate response to this fact must be some form of ambivalence, but that lovers have reason to prefer an ambivalence that contextualizes regretted evils in the framework of what we (...)
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  18. Robert Merrihew Adams (2004). Voluntarism and the Shape of a History. Utilitas 16 (2):124-132.
    This article is concerned with the shape of the story of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century moral philosophy as told by J. B. Schneewind in The Invention of Autonomy. After discussion of alternative possible shapes for such a story, the focus falls on the question to what extent, in Schneewind's account, strands of empiricist voluntarism and rationalist intellectualism are interwoven in Kant. This in turn leads to consideration of different types of voluntarism and their roles in early modern ethical theory. Correspondence:c1 robert.adams@mansfield.oxford.ac.uk.
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  19. Robert Merrihew Adams (2003). Anti-Consequentialism and the Transcendence of the Good. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):114–132.
  20. Robert Merrihew Adams (2003). The Silence of God in the Thought of Martin Buber. Philosophia 30 (1-4):51-68.
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  21. Robert Merrihew Adams, Louis Dupré, Robert C. Solomon, Alexander Nehamas, Harrison Hall, Charles Guignon, Thomas C. Anderson & Dorothy Leland (eds.) (2003). The Existentialists: Critical Essays on Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This volume brings together for the first time some of the most helpful and insightful essays on the four most influential and discussed philosophers in the history of existentialism: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.
     
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  22. Robert Merrihew Adams (2002). Finite and Infinite Goods. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):459-466.
    Robert Adams gives a comprehensive philosophical account of a theistically-based framework for ethics. He draws on over twenty years of his published work to create this overarching framework, which is based upon the idea of a transcendent, infinite good, which is God, and its relation to the many finite examples of good in our experience. In giving this account, Adams explores ways in which a variety of philosophically unfashionable religious concepts can enrich the texture of ethical thought.
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  23. Robert Merrihew Adams (2002). Précis of Finite and Infinite Goods. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):439–444.
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  24. Robert Merrihew Adams (2002). Responses. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):475–490.
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  25. Robert Merrihew Adams (2002). Review: Précis of Finite and Infinite Goods. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):439 - 444.
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  26. Robert Merrihew Adams (2002). Review: Substance and Individuation in Leibniz. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (444):851-855.
  27. Robert Merrihew Adams (2002). Substance and Individuation in Leibniz. Mind 111 (444):851-855.
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  28. Robert Merrihew Adams (2001). Scanlon's Contractualism: Critical Notice of T. M. Scanlon, "What We Owe to Each Other". Philosophical Review 110 (4):563-586.
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  29. Robert Merrihew Adams (2001). Scritti Filosofici. [REVIEW] The Leibniz Review 11:25-28.
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  30. Robert Merrihew Adams (2000). God, Possibility, and Kant. Faith and Philosophy 17 (4):425-440.
    In one of his precritical works, Kant defends, as “the only possible” way of demonstrating the existence of God, an argument from the nature of possibility. Whereas Leibniz had argued that possibilities must be thought by God in order to obtain the ontological standing that they need, Kant argued that at least the most fundamental possibilities must be exemplified in God. Here Kant’s argument is critically examined in comparison with its Leibnizian predecessor, and it is suggested that an argument combining (...)
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  31. Robert Merrihew Adams (2000). Leibniz's Conception of Religion. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:57-70.
    Leibniz’s religious cosmopolitanism is one of the main ways in which his thought foreshadows the Enlightenment. Of the controversial issues of his time, it is the one on which he was boldest. His commitment to it is discussed here in relation to both the Chinese Rites Controversy and the reunion of Christendom, and the main features of his conception of religion are discussed. (1) It is a religious and normative conception. (2) Its main principle is “the love of God above (...)
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  32. Robert Merrihew Adams (2000). Trinità E Incarnazione. The Leibniz Review 10:53-60.
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  33. Robert Merrihew Adams (2000). Reading the Silences, Questioning the Terms: A Response to the Focus on Eighteenth-Century Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):281 - 284.
    It is striking that most of the essays in this Focus do not explore the specifically religious aspects of Enlightenment ethical thought. A principled reason for this may be found in a conception of religion that makes it hard for Enlightenment thinkers to seem religious at all. Neither does this conception fit anything that is likely to be a live option for most people today, and the now prevalent unpopularity of eighteenth-century piety and religious thought may blind us to important (...)
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  34. Robert Merrihew Adams (1999). Finite and Infinite Goods: A Framework for Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Renowned scholar Robert Adams explores the relation between religion and ethics through a comprehensive philosophical account of a theistically-based framework for ethics. Adams' framework begins with the good rather than the right, and with excellence rather than usefulness. He argues that loving the excellent, of which adoring God is a clear example, is the most fundamental aspect of a life well lived. Developing his original and detailed theory, Adams contends that devotion, the sacred, grace, martyrdom, worship, vocation, faith, and other (...)
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  35. Robert Merrihew Adams (1998). Self-Love and the Vices of Self-Preference. Faith and Philosophy 15 (4):500-513.
    The paper explores the extent to which self-love, as understood by Bishop Butler, may be in harmony with altruistic virtue. Whereas Butler was primarily concerned to rebut suspicions directed against altruism, the suspicions principally addressed by the present writer are directed against self-love. It is argued that the main vices of self-preference---particularly selfishness, self-centeredness, and arrogance---are not essentially excesses of self-love and, indeed, do not necessarily involve self-love. lt is argued further that self-love is something one is typically taught as (...)
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  36. Robert Merrihew Adams (1997). Sleigh's Leibniz & Arnauld: A Commentary on Their Correspondence. Noûs 31 (2):266–277.
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  37. Robert Merrihew Adams (1997). Thisness and Time Travel. Philosophia 25 (1-4):407-415.
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  38. Robert Merrihew Adams (1997). Things in Themselves. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):801-825.
    The paper is an interpretation and defense of Kant's conception of things in themselves as noumena, along the following lines. Noumena are transempirical realities. As such they have several important roles in Kant's critical philosophy (Section 1). Our theoretical faculties cannot obtain enough content for a conception of noumena that would assure their real possibility as objects, but can establish their merely formal logical possibility (Sections 2-3). Our practical reason, however, grounds belief in the real possibility of some noumena, and (...)
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  39. Robert Merrihew Adams (1997). Symbolic Value. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 21 (1):1-15.
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  40. Robert Merrihew Adams (1996). Response to Carriero, Mugnai, and Garber. The Leibniz Review 6:107-125.
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  41. Robert Merrihew Adams (1996). Schleiermacher on Evil. Faith and Philosophy 13 (4):563-583.
    Schleiermacher’s theology of absolute dependence implies that absolutely everything, including evil, including even sin, is grounded in the divine causality. In addition to God’s general, creative causality, however, he thinks that Christian consciousness reveals a special, teleologically ordered divine causality which is at work in redemption but not in evil. He identifies good and evil, respectively, with what furthers and what obstructs the development of the religious consciousness in human beings. Mere pains and natural ills are not truly evil, in (...)
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  42. Robert Merrihew Adams (1996). The Cambridge Companion to Leibniz. Philosophical Review 105 (2):245-248.
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  43. Robert Merrihew Adams (1995). Moral Faith. Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):75-95.
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  44. Robert Merrihew Adams (1995). Moral Horror and the Sacred. Journal of Religious Ethics 23 (2):201 - 224.
    The sense of moral horror at certain deeds and the related idea of the sacred have not been given as central a place in ethical theory, theological or secular, as they have in our moral consciousness. I place them in a broader theological metaethics, in a way that I hope avoids mere taboo and provides for a rational critique of our responses. Moral horror is understood here in terms of violation of the sacred, and the sacred is understood in terms (...)
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  45. Robert Merrihew Adams (1995). Qualia. Faith and Philosophy 12 (4):472-474.
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  46. Robert Merrihew Adams (1994). Leibniz: Determinist, Theist, Idealist. Oxford University Press.
    Legendary since his own time as a universal genius, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) contributed significantly to almost every branch of learning. One of the creators of modern mathematics, and probably the most sophisticated logician between the Middle Ages and Frege, as well as a pioneer of ecumenical theology, he also wrote extensively on such diverse subjects as history, geology, and physics. But the part of his work that is most studied today is probably his writings in metaphysics, which have been (...)
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  47. Robert Merrihew Adams (1994). Leibniz's Examination of the Christian Religion. Faith and Philosophy 11 (4):517-546.
  48. Robert Merrihew Adams (1994). Theodicy and Divine Intervention. In Thomas F. Tracy (ed.), The God Who Acts: Philosophical and Theological Explorations. Pennsylvania State University Press
     
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  49. Robert Merrihew Adams (1993). Form und Materie bei Leibniz: die mittleren Jahre. Studia Leibnitiana 25 (2):132.
    Recent influential interpreters have argued that the philosophy of body that prevails in Leibniz's writings from the 1680' s to about 1704 is both more Aristotelian and less idealistic than the ' monadology' of his last years. It is argued here that the Aristotelian terminology of matter and form which is undoubtedly prominent in the work of Leibniz's ' middle years' was understood by him in a sense that is consistent with the monadology. The monadology is foreshadowed, moreover, in important (...)
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