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Robert N. Johnson [18]Robert Neal Johnson [1]
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Profile: Robert Johnson (University of Missouri, Columbia)
  1. Robert N. Johnson, Kantian Irrealism, 5/31/06, RNJ, P. 1 of 23.
    Kantian ethics can at times appear to defend the position that there is a unique sort of value that plays a foundational role in morality. For instance, Kant’s most well known work in ethics, the Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals, begins by trying to establish that a good will is good ‘without qualification’ and then ends with a first statement of the fundamental principle that divides right from wrong, the Categorical Imperative.1 This presentation can make it seems as if (...)
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  2. Two-Level Eudaimonism, Second-Personal Reasons Two-Level Eudaimonism, Second-Personal Reasons, Anita L. Allen, Jack Balkin, Seyla Benhabib, Talbot Brewer, Peter Cane, Thomas Hurka & Robert N. Johnson (2012). Autonomous Action: Self-Determination in the Passive Mode Autonomous Action: Self-Determination in the Passive Mode (Pp. 647-691). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (4).
     
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  3. Robert N. Johnson (2011). Self-Improvement: An Essay in Kantian Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Is there any moral obligation to improve oneself, to foster and develop various capacities in oneself? From a broadly Kantian point of view, Self-Improvement defends the view that there is such an obligation and that it is an obligation that each person owes to him or herself. The defence addresses a range of arguments philosophers have mobilized against this idea, including the argument that it is impossible to owe anything to yourself, and the view that an obligation to improve onself (...)
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  4. Robert N. Johnson (2010). Duties to and Regarding Others. In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  5. Robert N. Johnson (2008). Was Kant a Virtue Ethicist? In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter.
    You might think a simple “No” would suffice as an answer. But there are features of Kant’s ethics that appear to be strikingly similar to virtue oriented views, so striking that some Kantians themselves have argued that Kant’s ethics in fact shares these features with virtue ethics. In what follows, I will argue against this view, though along the way I will acknowledge the features of Kant’s view that make it appear more like a kind of virtue ethics than it (...)
     
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  6. Robert N. Johnson (2007). Prichard, Falk, and the End of Deliberation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (5):pp. 131-147.
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  7. Robert N. Johnson (2007). Value and Autonomy in Kantian Ethics. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics: Volume Ii. Clarendon Press.
  8. Roger Crisp, Larry S. Temkin, Robert Sugden, Robert N. Johnson, George Klosko & Paul Hurley (2003). 10. Jacob Levy, The Multiculturalism of Fear Jacob Levy, The Multiculturalism of Fear (Pp. 891-895). Ethics 113 (4).
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  9. Robert N. Johnson (2003). Internal Reasons: Reply to Brady, Van Roojen and Gert. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):573–580.
    In an earlier paper I identified two desiderata of a theory of practical reasons which favour internalism, and then argued that forms of this doctrine which are currently on offer lose either one or the other in trying to avoid the conditional fallacy. Michael Brady, Mark van Roojen and Josh Gert have separately attempted to respond to my argument. I set out reasons why all fail.
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  10. Robert N. Johnson (2003). Virtue and Right. Ethics 113 (4):810-834.
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  11. Robert N. Johnson (2002). Happiness as a Natural End. In Mark Timmons (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: Interpretative Essays. Clarendon Press.
     
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  12. Robert N. Johnson (2002). Review: The Authority of Reason. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (443):676-679.
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  13. Robert N. Johnson (2002). The Authority of Reason. Mind 111 (443):676-679.
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  14. Robert N. Johnson (1999). Internal Reasons and the Conditional Fallacy. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (194):53-71.
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  15. Robert N. Johnson (1998). Minding One's Manners: Revisiting Moral Explanations. Philosophical Studies 90 (2):181-203.
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  16. Robert N. Johnson (1997). Kantian Ethics Almost Without Apology. Philosophical Review 106 (4):594-595.
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  17. Robert Neal Johnson (1997). Reasons and Advice for the Practically Rational. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (3):619-625.
    This paper defends a model of the internalism requirement against Michael Smith's recent criticisms of it. On this "example model", what we have reason to do is what we would be motivated to do were we rational. After criticizing the example model, Smith argues that his "advice model", that what we have reason to do is what we would advise ourselves to do were we rational, is obviously preferable. The author argues that Smith's criticisms can quite easily be accommodated by (...)
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  18. Robert N. Johnson (1996). Expressing a Good Will: Kant on the Motive of Duty. Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):147-168.
    If any action is to be morally good it is not enough that it should conform to the moral law-it must also be done for the sake of the moral law: where this is not so, the conformity is only too contingent and precarious, since the nonmoral ground at work will now and then produce actions which accord with the law, but very often actions which transgress it.
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  19. Of Merit & Robert N. Johnson (1996). Kant's Conception. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77:310.
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