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Profile: Robert Farrell (City University of New York)
  1.  17
    Robert P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2007). Applying Self-Directed Anticipative Learning to Science I: Agency, Error, and the Interactive Exploration of Possibility Space in Early Ape-Langugae Research. Perspectives on Science 15 (1):87-124.
    : The purpose of this paper and its sister paper (Farrell and Hooker, b) is to present, evaluate and elaborate a proposed new model for the process of scientific development: self-directed anticipative learning (SDAL). The vehicle for its evaluation is a new analysis of a well-known historical episode: the development of ape-language research. In this first paper we outline five prominent features of SDAL that will need to be realized in applying SDAL to science: 1) interactive exploration of possibility space; (...)
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  2.  16
    Robert P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2007). Applying Self-Directed Anticipative Learning to Science II: Learning How to Learn Across a Revolution in Early Ape Language Research. Perspectives on Science 15 (2):222-255.
    : The purpose of this paper and its sister paper I (Farrell and Hooker, a) is to present, evaluate and elaborate a proposed new model for the process of scientific development: self-directed anticipative learning. The vehicle for its evaluation is a new analysis of a well-known historical episode: the development of ape language research. Paper I examined the basic features of SDAL in relation to the early history of ape-language research. In this second paper we examine the reconceptualization of ape-language (...)
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  3.  6
    Robert P. Farrell (2006). Rational Versus Anti-Rational Interpretations of Science: An Ape-Language Case-Study. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (1):83-100.
    Robert Nola has argued that anti-rationalist interpretations of science fail to adequately explain the process of science, since objective reasons can be causal factors in belief formation. While I agree with Nola that objective reasons can be a cause of belief, in this paper I present a version of the strong programme in the sociology of knowledge, the Interests Thesis, and argue that the Interests Thesis provides a plausible explanation of an episode in the history of ape-language research. Specifically, I (...)
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  4.  64
    Robert P. Farrell (2000). Will the Popperian Feyerabend Please Step Forward: Pluralistic, Popperian Themes in the Philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (3):257 – 266.
    John Preston has claimed that we must understand Paul Feyerabend's later, post-1970, philosophy in terms of a disappointed Popperianism: that Feyerabend became a sceptical, relativistic, literal anarchist because of his perception of the failure of Popper's philosophy. I argue that this claim cannot be supported and trace the development of Feyerabend's philosophy in terms of a commitment to the central Popperian themes of criticism and critical explanatory progress. This commitment led Feyerabend to reject Popper's specific methodology in favour of a (...)
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